Solved windows 7 not allowing PC to boot

Samsung /
February 17, 2017 at 09:39:30
Specs: Windows 7, 512
I have tried safe mode, advanced boot options, and LKGC without luck. It just spins or sticks, and the fan turns on, and I have to power down. The message on startup states, "Windows failed to start. A recent hardware or software change might be the cause." No matter what I choose, launch startup repair or start windows normally,it doesn't reboot. I also tried the systems recovery disk to no avail. Sorry, it's Windows Home Prem OA. I'm not tech savvy enough for this!
Please help! Thanks.

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✔ Best Answer
February 17, 2017 at 21:40:30
Repair your computer should give you repair options including Start Up Repair and System Restore. These work from outside of Windows that is installed and may work when the built in repairs do not. Obvious;y you cannot use System Restore with no restore points but Start Up Repair from there may help and worth a try. It may offer an option for a Repair Install which should be safe for you BUT only do it if you have a good back up of your important files. You can use a Live Linux CD/DVD to boot to (ram only, not install) and copy over all important stuff first. Then you will have extra protection in case something goes wrong.
You may also want to test your RAM with a bootable CD with Memtest86 on it and your hard drive witha bootable CD with Seatools from Seagate on it (short hard drive test only).

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.



#1
February 17, 2017 at 11:34:31
If you tap F8 during boot up do you get as far as the startup menu? If so can you get into Command Prompt?

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#2
February 17, 2017 at 12:43:36
Thanks, Derek! Yes, we can get into command prompt. We tried several different lines of code in each drive and exited out of the dos prompt but nothing seems to work. What's weird is that the backslash key won't work in dos and the PC won't recognize the external keyboard.

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#3
February 17, 2017 at 14:13:30
OK. Use the command here (rstrui.exe and press Enter) to see if you can get to System Restore. If you make it choose a restore point dated just before the problem came along:
http://www.tech-recipes.com/rx/2022...

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

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Related Solutions

#4
February 17, 2017 at 15:36:18
No restore points have been created...open system protection
On a separate note: I tried the \ key and it works now. Weird.

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#5
February 17, 2017 at 18:09:46
Not sure if I should click the system protection, so I'll wait for you.

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#6
February 17, 2017 at 18:33:51
I think it is only telling you to open system protection so that you can configure restore. Obviously that won't help if there are no restore points.

Not sure what systems recovery disk you mean but it might be that you have to set the disk drive ahead of the hard disk in BIOS, then boot with the disk already in the drive.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#7
February 17, 2017 at 19:25:11
Sorry, it's my windows 7 recovery disk. Loading files...The disk loaded before the hard drive. If I install now, will that wipe everything I have on the PC? Should I click "Repair your computer?" Sorry. I'll wait. 😊

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#8
February 17, 2017 at 21:40:30
✔ Best Answer
Repair your computer should give you repair options including Start Up Repair and System Restore. These work from outside of Windows that is installed and may work when the built in repairs do not. Obvious;y you cannot use System Restore with no restore points but Start Up Repair from there may help and worth a try. It may offer an option for a Repair Install which should be safe for you BUT only do it if you have a good back up of your important files. You can use a Live Linux CD/DVD to boot to (ram only, not install) and copy over all important stuff first. Then you will have extra protection in case something goes wrong.
You may also want to test your RAM with a bootable CD with Memtest86 on it and your hard drive witha bootable CD with Seatools from Seagate on it (short hard drive test only).

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#9
February 18, 2017 at 11:05:25
Thanks, Fingers. Started Satrtup Repair and the buttons are in Japanese. It's checking for disk repairs and it "might take over an hour to complete."

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#10
February 18, 2017 at 11:38:35
Ok, it finished and said it could not repair the problems, and I should restart the computer.
I'm now back to the install Windows box and my options are to install now or repair computer. It's like a vicious cycle.

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#11
February 19, 2017 at 21:14:52
You marked it solved. It does not appear to be completely solved. As I said above, if you do not have a good back up take steps with Live Linux like Puppy Linux or others to access hard drive and save your stuff before a reinstall. If you get the option for a Repair Install then take it, it will reinstall the operating system without overwriting all files (back up anyway).
I do still recommend testing the hard drive and memory to see if your issue is hardware related or hardware caused.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#12
February 20, 2017 at 09:32:59
Thanks for noticing, Fingers. I was able to recover the data I needed from my external drive. My hubby ended up taking over and uploaded another OS, and it made things way too confusing to communicate to you. My plan to listen to you for every step was hijacked, and I know how frustrating that is to you guys when we don't follow directions or take your advice. So, "solved" means I don't even know what to ask you from here. My plan was to swipe it. Thoughts?

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#13
February 20, 2017 at 20:59:51
The important thing is your personal files, as long as you have a verified good back up then wiping the drive and reinstalling is as good an answer as any.
Sometimes picking away at the problem will get it solved but there is no guaranty that it will be easier or faster than a complete reinstall. I just recommend testing the hard drive and even the memory to make sure that the root of the problem was not hardware related. Testing these will prove that these components and the system itself can work so you are not wiping the drive for no reason. Of course if Windows (or Linux) installs and works then it also proves the hardware is not a fault so the choice is yours.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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