Windows 7 installation Systemic corrupted

Microsoft Windows 7 ultimate 64-bit
February 14, 2010 at 20:08:40
Specs: Windows 7
I cannot even get the JAVA system report from this site to work. Since installing the "clean" version of Win 7 on this DIY computer--late 10.2009--retail: Intel 1156 P5 platform, i7 860 chip, Gigabyte P55 UD5 mobo, 8 GB Corsair Dominator DDR3 (1600), Corsair P128 SSD main drive, 2 other internal (WD 1TB Caviar Black & Raptor 300 MB), NVIDIA GTX 280 GPU, Creative X-fI Fatality Pro--EVERY hardware component updated to latest Win 7 Ult 64-bit driver (if available).
3 clean OS installs, 2 upgrade (within Win environment--apparently only option to do so), 3 image restores from Acronis True Image 2010 later & a day doesn't go by with seemingly random problems--progrmas don't start, properly install (with non-specific error messages), occasional BSODs.--even when idle, file associations seems to break on their own etc. MS diagnostics NEVER report errors or offer solutions--both free & (attempted paid) support utterly useless. Error reporting "narrow" it down to hardware, software or "other" errors, & no one (including paid 3rd party "support sites" will even take the time to analyze whatever diagnostic reports may be helpful, & which if helpful, I do not have the expertise to try to isolate the problem(s). HELP!!!! I'd attach the MSINFO32 report if I was able.

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#1
February 14, 2010 at 21:53:56
If you have reinstalled the OS that many times, and you still have problems, I think we can confidently say it is a hardware problem. I would suggest you use a Memtest 86+ bootable CD to test your memory and use a linux live CD, Bart PE cd, or another working computer to test your hard drive. Also, make sure you don't have anything weird going on around your computer like really unclean power going into it, a microwave runnign right next to it, etc.

-Ryan Adams

Free Computer Tips and more:http://RyanTAdams.com
Paid Tech Support: Black Diamond


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#2
February 14, 2010 at 23:55:06
you do not say what PSU you are using, its very possible that such a high end rig would require a pretty high end psu, 700watt +.
having had a failing PSU over the last few months, and symptoms much the same as yours i would recommend, trying a different psu, just to be sure if you can borrow one, but remember its not onlt wattage, but amperage, 25 amps from at least 2 seperate rails would be my advice..

i hate computers!
but cant help myself....


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#3
February 15, 2010 at 00:13:44
Ryan
Thanks for the reply. I've run Memtest 86+ v.4.0 at least for 3 full passes now without any error showing: yes, you can run it for days vs. about 3+ hours--but per the docs, it's unlikely (but possible) that an error will materialize.
The fact that the c: drive is a Corsair SSD I think makes testing a bit more difficult--comparatively short testing shows no errors. Atto shows that it's a fast sucker (about 225 mb/s read, 172 write) but I'm not certain it checks for errors & I'm not sure if it responds to SMART.
The PSU is a Corsair TX 750W, which like the NVIDIA GPU & the Creative sound card, are not OEM from the Velocity Micro Raptor case--even the coolings fans were all replaced, as welll as 2 LG Blu-ray optical drives (1 r/w & 1 read-only). Prior to the new mobo, Intel i7 chip, memory & SSD (which were installed immediately prior to the 1st clean install), none of these components gave me any problems on an Intel 775 platform running a dual-boot XP Pro & Vista Ultimate (both 32-bit). I've had more problems with Win 7 than any MS OS I've owned since the days of MS-DOS, & a Dell XPS Gen 3 in the same location nowhere near a microwave etc. There's a UPC XL 1200 close to the computer, but this has been been there for the last 7 years or so without apparent electro-magnetic side effects.
I agree with you that the problem is likely hardware-related, but I'm beside myself trying to isolate what specifically is causing the corruption. No overclocking & very low temps (about 30-32 F CPU & ambient, hottest component is the GPU at about 47 F). For that matter, I can't even rule out bad Gigabyte, NVIDIA Creative etc. 64-bit drivers, since it's been a nightmare since Win 7 & the new hardware (as above) were 1st installed.
Richard

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#4
February 15, 2010 at 02:36:18
have you tried installing the 32 bit version, do it on another partition, at least that will give you a hint, to drivers x64,
or narrow it down a bit more to hardware.
only takes 30 mins to install and then run for a while, it may save you pulling your hair out till you find the issue if its a driver. and if its the same in 32 bit then for sure you know its hardware,
then you can start by changing each bit till you find the culprit,
personally ive had next to no problems with win7 x64 or x86, on lots of systems old and new..so i am inclined to believe its not the OS,
you could also try to download another copy of win7 and install again, just in case its a clitch on your copy..

i hate computers!
but cant help myself....


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#5
February 15, 2010 at 05:59:52
I also have been running Windows 7 64bit without any problems for months now. I also think that reinstalling clean (full format?) should eliminate that as a problem source. I will list in order what I would suspect, maybe it will help.
Memory (already tested)
power coming in - use a UPS
power supply - swap out
hard drive - remove primary drive and install any of the others as solo drive
check/reseat all plugs not already retried
motherboard - recheck for newer driver - swap motherboard from another system and reinstall or repair windows 7 and test
test other components

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#6
February 17, 2010 at 15:32:21
First, I appreciate all those who responded & the advice given.
Since the post & the above replies, I again ran an upgrade install of Win 7 Ult (64-bit)--for the 3rd time (at least it takes > 1hour for the install & downloaded MS updates), just as I had previously done 3 clean installs. I further set the Gigabyte P55 UD5 mobo to the "safe" settings & lowered the clock on the Corsair memory to 1333. So far, no known problems, but this is ALWAYS the case after either an "update" (same OS) or clean install (always necessary in switching from 32 to 64 bit). Time will tell if this remains the case.
Therein lies the problem: everything appears fine at 1st & OS problems only develop after about a week or so.
So swapping components--particularly other than PCI-e video & audio is both very time-consuming (old PSU was modular, Corsair TX series is not) & somewhat incapacitating--given this time-lag. Further, a number of the suggested components worked without incident the day before (the PSU w/ APC UPS, the video & sound cards): the new mobo, memory, SSD (which I'll run ckdisk with auto fix errors--file & bad sectors) + my replaced mobo was an NVIDIA 775 board which cannot use the DDR3 ram or the i7 860 chip--these components were installed immediately prior to the change in the OS.
I DO suspect the problem is with the mobo, but note that Gigabyte support is truly awful--I've written them a # of times explicitly stating I'm ONLY asking about any mobo trouble-shooting utility or possble BIOS settings problems (& a LAN problem where download speeds are drastically reduced until I reboot the router & modem which immediately bumps the speed from 4-11 m/sec to around 22-30). NO response to the questions, only the same advice given above (some "lost-in-translation" suggestions to boot)--even after emphasizing that I'm not writing a mobo manufacturer for generalized advice. Given that the built-in OC utility IMMEDIATELY produced multiple errors at its most conservative settings, I don't have a lot of confidence here.
Thanks again.
Richard

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