Solved Windows 7 compresses photos when sent via email

June 14, 2013 at 17:25:29
Specs: Windows 7
I write for a newspaper and often send photos to go with my articles. I need the pictures to be sent uncompressed. Anyone know how to stop this?

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✔ Best Answer
June 16, 2013 at 03:37:39
If the picture is in a completely raw and uncompressed format the the best solution would to be to put the picture into a Zip file and sent that as an attachment.

It can be unzipped back to its original at its destination and no Email client is going to try and reduce the size of a zip file.

Stuart



#1
June 14, 2013 at 17:57:11
There should be a setting in your Email client to suppress compression. However, bear in mind that uncompressed images can be huge.

What format are you sending these images?

Most digital cameras produce images in JPEG format which is a compressed format to begin with and wont be compressed much further. What your Email client is probably doing is reducing the size of the image which certainly can be turned off.

Stuart


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#2
June 15, 2013 at 14:29:28
What email are you using?

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#3
June 15, 2013 at 20:25:43
It can depend on how the pictures were inserted in the email. My email client windows live mail has two ways.

Option one: If i choose to just insert a photo it is reducing the size automatically. Example a test I did turns a 3.5 mb pic to 110 kb in size. Photo to the recipient and the composer will appear directly in the email without them clicking on anything.

Option two: Send photo as an attachment. Photo is not reduced in size. File name only of the attachment will show, which needs to be clicked on to view the picture.

Just to add what StuartS wrote, most professionals take picture with cameras that have the capability of taken pictures in "Raw Format" This format is an uncompressed picture. Pictures are quite a lot larger in size compared to the jpeg format.


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Related Solutions

#4
June 16, 2013 at 03:37:39
✔ Best Answer
If the picture is in a completely raw and uncompressed format the the best solution would to be to put the picture into a Zip file and sent that as an attachment.

It can be unzipped back to its original at its destination and no Email client is going to try and reduce the size of a zip file.

Stuart


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#5
June 22, 2013 at 19:48:58
In my profession, I receive and email photos and camera-ready artwork everyday. I've never had any issues sending photos or other attachments, as long as the total size of the email and attachments didn't exceed the limits of our email client.

I'd like to suggest that the best way to send large files via email is not to use your regular email account. Instead, there are several reliable and free large-file transfer services available online. I recommend using WeTransfer https://www.wetransfer.com/

It's fairly simple to navigate. You simply upload your files or photos, one at a time, enter the email address of the recipient, followed by your email address and a message, and then send. A spinning circle appears which counts down the transfer (from 0-100%)until it has been sent. You'll see a green check mark when the transfer is completed. WeTransfer will email you to confirm that your file transfer was successful and once the recipient has received and downloaded your files, WeTransfer will email you to notify you that the files were downloaded. It's a simple solution and it permits the transfer of up to 2GB. Your files will arrive just as you sent them. If you have any difficulty using WeTransfer, let me know and I can help you out. I like using it for large files, and I always suggest that my clients use it when they are sending me large files that can't be emailed.

I also agree with an earlier comment that using a program like WinZip (PC) or Stuffit (MAC) is another simple way of collecting your files into one, compressed file for emailing, which can be decompressed by the recipient using the same program on their end.


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