Windows 7 Booting up

Microsoft Windows 7 home premium 64-bit
March 29, 2010 at 13:05:39
Specs: Windows XP
I have had Windows 7 installed on a computer for about 2 months now, fresh install. This computer is used at work to test headset compatability, it is always left on. I come in Monday morning and try to use it and the hard drive does't want to boot up. At first I thought it was because I didn't register the software, but now I am beginning to think otherwise. Any ideas?

See More: Windows 7 Booting up

Report •

#1
March 29, 2010 at 13:18:16
You need to be a bit more specific. Does the system start at all? At what point does the system stop booting? Do you receive any error messages?

"I've always been mad, I know I've been mad, like the most of us..."


Report •

#2
March 30, 2010 at 04:40:04
The system starts up, but not on the screen, it is blank. I don't see Windows loading either. My monitor power button blinks on and off. The hard drive lights up but then turns off and doesn't light up or start at all.

Report •

#3
March 30, 2010 at 06:05:54
if you dont see the post on the screen, first thing to do is try another monitor.
try another monitor/cable also try a power cable for the monitor.

try reseating the video card, if indeed it has a card.

if you can see the post on the monitor at any point let us know.

i hate computers!
but cant help myself....


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
March 30, 2010 at 06:10:58
Win 7 installation is fresh, we know. Is the PC fresh, too ?

Is the PC connected to a UPS and/or UPS to a surge protector ?

Check the cable from the PC to the monitor. Maybe loose or stepped on by someone.

By the way, do you see BIOS post screen ?

Motherboard / gfx card / PSU dying ?

Regards

SuatCINI


Report •

#5
March 30, 2010 at 11:51:25
I agree with princecorum. The issue seem to be hardware related. If your monitor is not at fault -- I highly doubt it is, because you would get the POST beep even if you don't have a monitor hooked up to the PC -- it's got to be the video card or another piece of hardware.

I support reseating the video card or memory if you have integrated video & check all your cable connections while you are in the machine, something might have been dislodged.

Windows 7 News!


Report •

#6
March 30, 2010 at 14:31:58
> The system starts up, but not on the screen, it is blank.

You can try this and try that. Or you can have a definitive answer on some 30 different suspects by working for 30 seconds to record numbers.

Either you keep replacing things until something works or make the problem exponentially more complex. Or simply touch three critical wires with a multimeter problem to then post numbers. Those numbers tell the technically informed massive information; isolate the reason for failure to but a few or only one part.

A 3.5 digit multimeter can be borrowed from any electrician, auto mechanic, or purchased in any store that sells hammers. That means even K-mart or Lowes. Wal-mart sells it for less than $18.

Set meter to 20 volts. Touch each wire to read its voltage both before and as the power switch is pressed. For example, touch the purples wire from power supply to motherboard where that wire enters a nylon connector on the motherboard. It should read about 5 volts. But to have a useful reply, post that number accurate to three digits.

Do same for the green and gray wires. Post those six numbers (and behavior as the power switch is pressed) here to learn things you never knew.

You might do same for any red, orange, and yellow wires as the power switch is pressed. That may later provide additional information.

How to have an answer that is not 'it could be this or might be that"? Numbers from the purple, green, and gray wires point to the actual problem immediately - without wild speculation and without shotgunning.

And if you do so, the reply explains many simple things that happen inside your machine as its boots.


Report •

#7
March 30, 2010 at 17:05:11
The above is overly redundant & totally unnecessary. Do not heed the advise given in response #6.

Windows 7 News!


Report •

#8
April 1, 2010 at 05:31:38
The advise in post 6 means the next reply has defintiive answers. Those who say "it seems to be" are really only guessing. Those meter numbers mean the next answer specific. But only those who actually know how electrictiy works can understand how much information is in so few numbers. The most technically naive would never understand how a minutes labor can report so much.

Report •

#9
April 1, 2010 at 08:05:04
Sounds to me like your windows 7 does NOT have genuine key activated.

Some HELP in posting on Computing.net plus free progs and instructions Cheers


Report •

#10
April 1, 2010 at 10:45:29
I am thinking the same thing as XP although I have seen a dead harddrive behave this way.

Likely


I want to go like my grandfather did. Peacefully in his sleep. Not screaming at the top of my lungs like the passengers in his car.

(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")


Report •

#11
April 1, 2010 at 19:54:18
"The advise in post 6 means the next reply has defintiive answers. Those who say "it seems to be" are really only guessing. Those meter numbers mean the next answer specific. But only those who actually know how electrictiy works can understand how much information is in so few numbers. The most technically naive would never understand how a minutes labor can report so much."

The problem with the OP's machine has nothing to do with electricity. Furthermore, asserting that people need to be bonafide electronics experts to troubleshoot PCs is a logical fallacy. Nice try though, on trying to prove a point by asserting it. Ironically, knowing how to use a typical multimeter -- in & of itself -- does not even qualify anyone as an electronics guru or top-flight electrician & it just might surprise you how many people on this forum, there are, with access to a multimeter.

I want to assume you are familiar with computers, even though your argument suggest the opposite. People who fix computers will tell you, the root cause of a system issue isn't always obvious & many a times, a process of elimination is required even when the problem looks obvious on the surface & while a multimeter could come in handy, in rare instances, it isn't the holy grail of PC repair.

Windows 7 News!


Report •

Ask Question