Windows 7 Boot files on wrong drive

Microsoft Windows 7 home premium upgrade...
January 23, 2010 at 20:03:23
Specs: windows 7
i have 4 hardrives in my computer. We'll call
them A, B C & D

Vista installed on A
i clean installed 7 on B
but for some reason, the boot.ini was install
on C.

so in my bios, i have to set the computer to
boot drive C.

anyway i can fix this?


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#1
January 23, 2010 at 21:04:56
Vista and 7 don't use a boot.ini file... ???

-Ryan Adams

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#2
January 23, 2010 at 21:13:29
I mean the boot folder. I know it's there coz I can see it in my
backup program

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#3
January 24, 2010 at 09:11:36
Is your machine unbootable?

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Related Solutions

#4
January 24, 2010 at 10:55:58
Normally a bootable drive is determined by the first active partition listed in boot order device in bios (if selectable).

Older bios's can select between say ide0 and ide1 while most newer system can select any device from usb to cd.

Playing to the angels
Les Paul (1915-2009)


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#5
January 24, 2010 at 13:52:13
The thing is,

the boot folder is on the hard drive that i keep all my media on.

i have to set up my bios to boot to my media HDD (B) in order
to run WIN7 (C).

can i just move the boot folder from B to C?


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#6
January 24, 2010 at 14:12:52
"i have 4 hardrives in my computer. We'll call
them A, B C & D"

This is confusing. "A" is normally assigned to the floppy drive. Why don't you rephrase your question with the drive letters and applications as they appear on your computer.

Home Page http://ewen.uuuq.com/


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#7
January 24, 2010 at 16:07:32
C: Win 7
D: hardrive
M: media
F: Vista

Boot folder on M:
Win7 installed on C:

Have to set bios to boot to M: inorder to start in Win7


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#8
January 24, 2010 at 18:23:22
You could try going into Windows 7 (or Vista) and using the bcedit command to modify the boot settings. There are also some freeware graphical programs that can be used to edit the boot options.

-Ryan Adams

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#9
January 24, 2010 at 18:28:08
PS: Ewin, he was trying to find a way to reference the physical drives, not referring to the drive letters Windows assigns to partitions. That makes sense, because the drive letters Windows assigns doesn't mean much. You could have "A:" "B:" and "C:" on the same drive (multiple partitions) but the BIOS only sees one drive. Perhaps he should have called them drive 1, 2, 3, 4 instead... Hopefully that clears things up.

-Ryan Adams

Free Computer Tips and more:http://RyanTAdams.com
Paid Tech Support: Black Diamond


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#10
January 25, 2010 at 14:04:12
If it works then leave it. Are you saying that Windows 7 program file and users are on D as opposed to C?

Playing to the angels
Les Paul (1915-2009)


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#11
January 25, 2010 at 15:17:56
If these are 4 physically independant drives, you could remove all but the drives with operating systems on them and then do a repair on Vista and Windows 7 so they boot first without the other drives installed, then reinstall the drives.

Please note, I have NOT tried this myself, but logic says it SHOULD work.... Anyone else have any thoughts on this?


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#12
January 27, 2010 at 01:14:36
when you install win 7, the boot files and system files are sperated into 2 partitions automatically(mostly 100 reserve partition for the boot files), but how can it be on 2 different drives, that's wired... is the drive with system partition out of any unallocated space?
But you can always adjust and tidy your partitions up. actually the vista and win 7 can be installed on one drive easily...why don't you try that. but maybe you'll need some third party Partition Master tools...

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#13
January 27, 2010 at 15:55:18
All my hardrives only have 1 partition on them.

The vista drive won't remain in the computer for much longer. I
like to have a disc i can go back to if 7 doesn't work out.

I guess what i want to know is whether i can just copy the boot
folder from my media drive to the win7 system drive without
screwing everything up.


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#14
January 28, 2010 at 07:31:17
What about removing the Vista disk and doing a repair on the Windows 7 install, it should replace the boot files that will be missing.

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#15
January 28, 2010 at 17:33:34
How do you do a repair?

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#16
January 28, 2010 at 21:07:24
The windows 7 DVD has a repair feature. I have not need to use this feature, but from the description I have read on many of these help threads, that the easiest way to replace missing or corrupt boot files are to do a repair from the install disk. If you need more details, others will have to give that to you (or you probably can get it from windows 7 help site, or from other help threads here).
Sorry I can't be more specific, but fortunately for me, I have not needed that feature, so I cannot give you first hand experience in this matter.

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#17
March 15, 2010 at 02:31:08
pukoh,
I have the same configuration, only in my case it's XP and not
Vista. I also have a media hard disk, which now appears as
"System". Though in my case, after boot sequence in bios
was changed, win7 failed to boot. Furthermore, the repair disk
failed to recognize that there is a OS present on the disk.
Somehow, I got win7 to boot.
The question is, what was the solution that worked for you (if
at all) ?

Thanks,
Anatoly.


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#18
March 15, 2010 at 04:40:49
I haven't fixed the problem actually. Since it's still working I
didn't want to change anything without a definitive answer.

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#19
March 15, 2010 at 15:15:28
"C: Win 7
D: hardrive
M: media
F: Vista"
If that is the drive order in bios, it need not be the the order in Windows. If you installed Windows 7 on the 3rd hard drive listed in bios, it's possible that it installed on the correct drive in bios, but shows in a different order in Windows.
To check shut down and unplug the media drive, then try starting Windows with it disconnected.
If it fails to boot, use the W7 DVD to boot in with and start Windows setup and select the repair startup files option.
For how to run startup repair link to:
http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorial...

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