Win7 Starter - Windows Update not working

September 8, 2015 at 13:44:57
Specs: Win7 Starter , 1.0GHz / 2GB
Hi,
After a completely botched up attempt to upgrade to Win10, I was left with no other option than to reinvoke Win 7 Starter using the System Recovery CD Disks. Upon completion of the recovery I find that Windows Update check facility will not detect and download any updates, it simply keeps showing the "Checking for updates" dialogue box with the green progress indicator continually churning away. I installed Belarc Advisor which clearly indicates there are some 120 odd security hot fixes to be downloaded and installed. The only update that did download was Windows Update Agent ver 7.6.7600.320. I checked the Properties/Details of file Windows\System32\Wuaueng to confirm that the version 7.6.7600.320 was in fact installed, which it was. I ran both Microsoft Fixit50123-WinUpdate and WindowsUpdateDiagnostic applications but without success. I manually downloaded and installed the necessary pre-requisite patches and install file to raise Internet Explorer from ver 8 to ver 11 in the hope that it might make a difference but to no avail. Can anyone offer any assistance please as, until the updates are downloaded and istalled, the PC is too vulnerable to be used. Many thanks - Bob Deb.

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#1
September 8, 2015 at 14:58:19
You could try this:
https://support.microsoft.com/en-us...

Select this download "All supported x86-based versions of Windows 7 SP1" (assuming you are 32 bit). Double click the downloaded file and hope for the best.

Most likely it is the version you now have but I suppose that there is a vague chance it will jigger WU into life. Restart the computer afterwards.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#2
September 8, 2015 at 19:40:48
Are you running Windows Update manually (Start>All Programs>Windows Update)? If not then try that and if it completes the Searching for Updates that way, try installing only 20 to 25 at a time and then repeating it. This also helps stubborn updating when there are a lot of updates available (like when reinstalling). If you do not have SP1 installed yet then do that first by itself and many of the others will disappear from the list and it is better to install a service pack by itself anyway.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#3
September 15, 2015 at 17:19:31
Hi Derek,
Many thanks for your reply, I tried the method you suggested along with that suggested by "Fingers" plus many other things out of sheer desperation, all to no avail. So I bit the bullet, installed a new clean hard drive, downloaded Win8 driver for my Atheros WiFi network adapter and Win 10 ISO (on my faithful, trusty old XP PC). Created a Win 10 install disc (old faithful again) from which I reinstalled Win10, quickly disabled WiFi network adapter before the PC knew what was happening and replaced the driver. Voila!
Everything hung together. So the Win7 problem is a thing of the past, no doubt to be replaced by a heap of Win 10 problems. Many thanks for you assistance - Bob Deb.

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#4
September 15, 2015 at 17:21:48
Hi "Fingers",
Please refer to my reply to Derek. Many thanks to you both - Bob Deb.

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#5
September 15, 2015 at 17:30:36
Glad to hear you sorted it and thanks for popping back to let us know.

message edited by Derek


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#6
September 16, 2015 at 15:44:10
Final Thoughts - Now that the problem is behind me (win 10 'bedded down' nicely) I've had time for some rational reflection on the Win 7update problem that may be food for thought for others in a similar predicament. It's only conjecture on my behalf but it is supported by one particular aspect of the overall exercise which I will mention shortly.
The first time I updated from W7 to W10 was via the "Get W10" facility that arrived on my PC. W10 didn't work, but gave me an error message which I was determined to follow up. So I rolled back to W7 using the rollback feature and everything was OK. So far so good, microsoft saw the PC's return to W7 and re-endowed it with full W7 functionality. Having decided I had found the answer to the problem I again used the same procedure to return to W10 but, being slower to react than the PC, completely botched up the whole show to the extent that I could not roll back to W7. So I was forced to use my W7 recovery discs to reinstall it on my PC. Not having used the accepted roll back procedure, microsoft may well have still associated the PC with W10 and jacked up on providing the W7 updates. This is supported by some degree by the fact that, when I reinstalled W10 using the install disc - totally independant of the "Get W10" function - microsoft, after a short time delay, activated the W10 installation. In my opinion it would only do this if it had previously associated the PC with the W10 operating system. It is my belief that, not having tracked the return to W7 after the botched attempt, microsoft retained the association of the PC with W10. Purely conjecture upon my part but very much supported by the events surrounding the automatic activation from a totally independant install procedure. Best regards - Bob Deb.

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#7
September 16, 2015 at 16:21:56
One thing is certain, once Win 10 has been installed MS have registered your computer details for activation using Win 10. For this reason you can re-install from an ISO and be accepted immediately. However, my feeling is that the same details remain accepted by MS for your previous operating system. I think there might well be something in your ideas but somehow the jig saw still doesn't quite fit together.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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