When and how to install chipset info

March 17, 2015 at 09:21:35
Specs: Win 7
I just did a clean install of Windows 7 X64 Home Premium and
Service Pack 1 on a computer with an ASUS P5Q-E motherboard.
This is about the fifth time I've done it in as many years.

It has never been clear to me what motherboard drivers or
chipset info are needed. The following appears to be the
latest appropriate info for the Intel P45 Express chipset.
I have drastically edited these instructions for brevity:


Intel(R) Chipset Device Software
* Release: Production Version
* Version: 9.1.1.1025
* Date: December 14 2009

************************************************************
* 9F. INSTALLING THE Windows 7* INF FILES AFTER
* OS INSTALLATION
************************************************************
Some Intel(R) chipset platforms already are supported by
Windows 7* so it may not be necessary to use the INF
files provided by this software to update Windows 7*.

The following steps describe the installation process of
the Windows 7* INF files. You may need to repeat these
steps to update all Intel(R) chipset devices not supported
by Windows 7*.

1. Copy infinst911autol.exe to a convenient location.
2. Close all programs currently running on the system.
3. Open Control Panel.
4. Open Device Manager.
5. Under the View menu, select "Devices by connection".
6. Click on MPS Uniprocessor PC -OR- MPS Multiprocessor PC.
..... NOTE: Only one of the above items will be
..... displayed for a given system.
7. Click on PCI bus.
8. Right-click on the line containing the description
..... PCI standard host CPU bridge
..... -or-
..... PCI standard ISA bridge
..... -or-
..... PCI standard PCI-to-PCI bridge
..... -or-
..... PCI System Management Bus
..... -or-
..... Standard Dual PCI IDE Controller
..... -or-
..... Standard Universal PCI to USB Host Controller
..... (This line will be selected.)
9. Select Properties from the pull-down menu.
10. Click on the Driver tab.
11. Click on the Update Driver button.
12. Windows 7* will launch the Upgrade Device Driver Wizard.
..... Select Browse my computer for the driver software.
13. Enter the drive where you copied infinst911autol.exe.
14. Ensure that the Include Subfolders checkbox is checked
15. Select Next
16. The window Will Display the Device that was installed
17. Select Close
18. Reboot the system if prompted to do so.


However, none of the items listed under steps 6 and 8 are
in Device Manager. Instead of "MPS Uniprocessor PC" or
"MPS Multiprocessor PC", I have "ACPI x64-based PC".
Under PCI bus I have 17 entries, all but 2 of which have
"Intel" in the name. Here is a screenshot of the Device
Manager window:

http://freemars.org/jeff4/chipinf/D...

Device Manager automatically opened everything the Intel
instructions said to open because of the "Unknown device"
with a (very tiny) exclamation mark. That exclamation mark
is part of what makes me think I need to update the chipset
info. I have gotten rid of it before, but not the last time I
installed Windows. I don't remember how I succeeded
previously. Last time I installed Windows, I just ran
infinst911autol.exe from Windows Explorer.

So my questions are:

- Do I need to install the chipset info?

- Is this the right chipset info file?

- How do I install it correctly?


-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


See More: When and how to install chipset info

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#1
March 17, 2015 at 09:48:21
Wow, that's a lot of re-installs.

If all aspects of the computer are working fine including, sound, graphics, internet connections, then it has most likely picked up adequate drivers from the Windows 7 install itself. Presumably there are no errors showing anywhere in Device Manager.

Is your computer home built and did the information come from you motherboard manufacturer? There are usually drivers available with a less convoluted install.

What did you do in the past when you reached this stage after your re-installs?

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#2
March 17, 2015 at 10:13:54
Best to use drivers from the motherboard manufacturer. The Intel, Realtek, etc., drivers are reference drivers that are NOT tailored to your motherboard.


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#3
March 17, 2015 at 16:16:41
Derek asked:

> Is your computer home built and did the information come from your
> motherboard manufacturer?

Yes. The disk that came with the ASUS motherboard was Vista-era.
It contains an earlier version of the same Intel readme file that I quoted
from above.

Someone somewhere told me that I should get the drivers from ASUS
online, but I had a hard time getting the info about which drivers to use.
Other people asked the same questions I asked on an ASUS help site,
but never got good answers. One guy in the Philippines seemed to be
the only person answering, and he wasn't very communicative. Because
of the confusion, I don't recall where I got various bits and pieces, or who
recommended each of them to me. I saved some files under ASUS
and some under Intel, which suggests where I got them, but I saved stuff
about this chipset INF file under both ASUS and Intel.

> There are usually drivers available with a less convoluted install.

The install program on the ASUS disk would not run on my computer.
I asked at the time but I never found any hint that ASUS made a Win 7
X64 version. So I did the best I could installing the bits and pieces.

> What did you do in the past when you reached this stage after your
> re-installs?

Kind of a long time has elapsed since the last time I did it, and the
time before that, so I've probably forgotten some things I learned the
first two or three times. (The last time I did it I learned that I should
have installed SP1 right after installing Windows 7, so this time I did.)
But as I said, last time I just threw up my hands and / or crossed my
fingers, hoped I had some Irish in me, ignored the instructions I quoted
from the Intel readme, and ran the chipset INF install exe.

> If all aspects of the computer are working fine including, sound,
> graphics, internet connections, then it has most likely picked up
> adequate drivers from the Windows 7 install itself.

I know from last time that I need to install the ATI graphics driver.
This website did funny things when I tried to scroll a page in IE with
the default driver installed by Windows 7.

> Presumably there are no errors showing anywhere in Device Manager.

As I mentioned in the first post, and showed in the screenshot, there
is one error, an "Unknown device", in a section relating to Intel. Also
as I said, I fixed that problem before, but not the last time I installed,
which makes me think that just running the exe didn't install the INF
files correctly, or at all.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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Related Solutions

#4
March 17, 2015 at 16:46:57
Oops didn't scroll down far enough, two more lines and I would have seen the unknown device.

Go to Device Manager, right click the Unknown Device and select Uninstall. If by any chance it asks if you want to uninstall the "software" too, decline it. Restart and see if the unknown device appears again. If a device exists it will pick up the software again (if any). It's just possible it will sort it but don't hold your breath.

I would do a good check around, including your IE scrolling etc. If the computer is behaving itself it might be best to leave well alone.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#5
March 17, 2015 at 23:15:35
I unistalled the unknown device. It re-unknowned itself.

The IE scrolling CRASH! just happened for the first time in maybe
two years. Not here, but at spaceweather.com. The Sun did it!
Another driver I know I need is for power management. Windows
crashed when I tried to preview a screen saver.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#6
March 18, 2015 at 06:42:10
"Someone somewhere told me that I should get the drivers from ASUS online, but I had a hard time getting the info about which drivers to use"

I don't know why there would be an issue finding the correct driver? I just went to the Asus site, found your board, clicked on Support > Drivers & Tools, entered the OS as Win7 64-bit, then clicked on Chipset. Get the newest one available, which is:

Intel(R) Chipset Software Installation Utility V9.1.1.1019 for Windows 32/64bit XP & 32/64bit Vista & 32/64bit Windows 7.(WHQL)

http://www.asus.com/Motherboards/P5...

Personally, I always install the chipset driver first because most everything else depends on it. Dell & Intel recommend running Windows Update before installing any drivers, but the 1st driver on their list is also the chipset driver.

http://www.dell.com/support/article...

http://www.labnol.org/software/devi...

message edited by riider


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#7
March 18, 2015 at 07:26:07
riider wrote:

> Get the newest one available, which is:
>
> Intel(R) Chipset Software Installation Utility V9.1.1.1019 for
> Windows 32/64bit XP & 32/64bit Vista & 32/64bit Windows 7.(WHQL)

The version from which I quoted the readme file above is newer by
three months. But what you found is probably what I want. It must
be two years since I last looked at that list of ASUS downloads.
Although the website has changed, the list looks the same, except
that I don't remember that chipset utility as being so big, with so
many files. Despite the version number being very familiar, maybe
I never downloaded it because of its size. I only got a broadband
Internet connection last year. Maybe what I downloaded with that
version number was just the smaller, hard-to-install Intel version.

> Personally, I always install the chipset driver first.

That's exactly what I was thinking. I'm not sure it makes a difference,
but it looked like it might, so I've been holding off on other things as
much as possible until I get that done.

> Dell & Intel recommend running Windows Update before installing
> any drivers, but the 1st driver on their list is also the chipset driver.

That is clearer and more explicit than what I'd come across, but
matches exactly my vague impression. I think that's got it!

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#8
March 18, 2015 at 14:25:32
Most of the ASUS drivers have both a Setup.exe file and an
AsusSetup.exe file. Any idea which should I double-click?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#9
March 18, 2015 at 15:03:08
Look in the Readme file - 99% sure it is Setup.exe you should use.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#10
March 18, 2015 at 15:14:16
Hah! The readme file is exactly what I quoted in my first post!
With the convoluted install proceedure.

Does computing.net have smilies? I need a bunch of smilies.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#11
March 18, 2015 at 16:00:27
Oh.

An Asus driver Readme I read recently said use setup.exe and the install went well. Both files were present.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#12
March 18, 2015 at 16:19:26
I'll do it. 99% of Derek's sureness is more than enough.
And it's probably what I did on some of those previous installs.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#13
March 19, 2015 at 08:15:00
Installing the chipset info didn't have any obvious effect, but then
installing the ASUS power management driver made the Unknown
device become the ATK0110 ACPI UTILITY.

Those seem to be okay.

Thank you.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#14
March 19, 2015 at 09:06:45
Aha, that's what it was then. Nicely done - thanks for the feedback.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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