Solved What program besides Windows 7 Paint edits JPEG files?

December 19, 2014 at 11:04:41
Specs: Windows 7
I need to erase some text on the bottom left side of a JPEG file and then crop the picture from the left by about 1 inch but not sure what program does this kind of editing?

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December 24, 2014 at 03:52:32
painthelper wrote:

> at the right, shown at the top you will see "Sharpen and Soften"

I see that I misunderstood what you meant by "I selected Sharpen
and Soften and first selected 25% Sharpen and then finally 50%
Sharpen for the blurring" in post #17. "Sharpen and Soften" was
just the title of the sub-menu in Word, and you selected "Sharpen"
from that sub-menu. I still don't understand why you said "for the
blurring", or why you think sharpening helps your images. I just
looked at an image I've had for a while where a bit of sharpening
did improve its overall appearance, although even that modest
amount of sharpening caused visible pixel artifacts.

What Derek suggested in post #18 is essentially what I suggested
in post #11, to make some reference images for your client to say
whether their quality is acceptable, so you will know whether what
he is expecting can be accomplished with the methods you are
using, and so you can determine if there is a difference in quality
between the images you are altering and the reference images.

Either you and your client are seeing the same thing and have
different expectations of what the images should look like, or you
are seeing different things because you are each displaying the
images differently.

Extracting images from PDF files, use of image sharpening, and
re-saving JPEG images all raise red flags for me. Any of those
steps could degrade image quality. If you are also reducing or
enlarging them, that would almost certainly degrade their quality.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis



#1
December 19, 2014 at 11:15:04
Could you link the picture on Imgur or something?

You can't simply erase the text and have the space where it was filled in with the original picture. The one exception to this is if the background is either solid or a consistent gradient, in which you could fill it in to at least somewhat match the original picture.

It sounds to me like paint would be fine if all you're doing is erasing and cropping, but we'll need to see the image so as to judge the complexity of the issue and determine which program would be best.

Oh, and take a look at this article:

http://www.pcmag.com/category2/0,28...

Click here for full system specs.


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#2
December 19, 2014 at 11:33:27
Thanks for responding and for your PC Mag links which I will review. I have not heard of Imgur before? Also, I am working remotely with PDF and Word 2010 files and cannot seem to get a really good image when I try to convert my PDF images into Word 2010 no matter what I do. I was hoping there might be someone out there that actually does this kind of work on a regular basis and possibly had some great tips on exactly how to do this as I have ten 10 complex, very detailed images to convert from .PDF to Word 2010 and so far no matter what I use the end result in Word is a blurry image and I cannot afford any expensive image editing software. I have tested many, many freeware programs and tips but so far have not been able to give my client a clear, sharp image in Word 2010. You would think someone has done this before but it seems unless you have Photoshop nothing much else seems to work perfectly for this issue.

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#3
December 19, 2014 at 14:57:06
"Gimp" would do this (a bit like Photoshop but everything is in different places):
http://www.gimp.org/

However I have done a heck of a lot in Paint, such as removing speckles on pictures and even remaking a photo which had a chunk torn off it. It takes time, patience and a few errors but can do wonders once you get really used to it.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#4
December 19, 2014 at 18:03:20
Thanks again for your reply and the info on Gimp which I have not heard of either. I really have no desire to get into Desktop Publishing or really having to fix images in any real way. I was just hoping that somehow, somewhere there was a quick way to convert a PDF image into Word 2010 without a lot of fuss and bother. I am not concerned about removing any small text or logo in the far left, bottom of the picture as that is very easy and not really part of the problem. What I cannot get is a large, unfuzzy image of the main Lot picture as this is the big problem and so far despite trying about 8 things I have not been able to get a clear picture (at least that is what the client says). If someone knows how to do this, it would be most helpful and this only, it would be most helpful.

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#5
December 19, 2014 at 19:17:49
If you don't need to do this much and the file is not larger then 100M then this online converter might be the best bet:
http://www.zamzar.com/

There are freebie programs out there if you Google "Convert PDF to Word" but most are trials and many free programs are unsafe these days. Keep watching here just in case someone has a freebie from a safe website that they can vouch for.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#6
December 19, 2014 at 20:01:09
GIMP is well known for doing much that Photoshop can, though often differently.
PDFedit an open source offering from sourceforge I would trust and probably can also perform the conversion (though I do not trust the ads that page for PDF conversion so stick with the program) and it is free to use:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/pdf...
You can download a free trial for 30 days for Photoshop or Corel Painter ( http://www.painterartist.com/us/pro... ) and use one of them for this particular project. My artist daughter uses Painter (came with her drawing tablet) and likes it. In fact you can also download the 30 day trial on Adobe Acrobat XI and use that as well for this limited need (you will have to uninstall it and might have to reinstall Acrobat Reader after removing the trial).

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#7
December 20, 2014 at 03:37:52
You might want to try to take a screen shot (prt scr) of the PDF, then paste it in an image editor(paint, gimp, etc) and saving in an image format (jpg, gif). Then insert it into the Word document.

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#8
December 20, 2014 at 04:50:03
To further Chas23's comment. Have you tried Windows 7 snipping tool?

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#9
December 20, 2014 at 12:08:34
I have tried probably 8 to 10 things now - Windows Snipping Tool, Microsoft Office Picture Manager, Adobe Acrobat XI Standard,
Word 2010's , Best Quality for High Resolution Graphics
http://wordribbon.tips.net/T010218_...
AcrobatUsers.com
Convert PDF to other formats
There should be a Preference setting for the resolution of the images taken with the Snapshot Tool. In Acrobat 9, it is in the General tab, but it may be elsewhere in Acrobat X.
Increase the value to something around 200, and see if it improves.
Word's 2010, right click and Save As Picture,
a bunch of web site links:
How to Extract Images from a .PDF file
Photoediting from PCMAG
But apparently none of these worked - the client still thought the detailed image was too blurry. I will try some of the suggestions from this group on Monday - thanks.



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#10
December 20, 2014 at 13:35:27
Do they look clear to you before sending them and is the blurring only after you've worked on them?

How large are the completed files? I'm wondering if they are small and the client is seeing them much larger, which would account for the blurring.

If the pictures are small they will never look so good if part of the process increases their size.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#11
December 20, 2014 at 19:03:40
How are the pictures being viewed? On a screen or printed on paper?

Internet explorer, at least, changes the size of images by default to fit the
window. I doubt Word would do that, but I haven't used Word in years.

I don't understand the purpose of setting a default resolution in a program.
For example, the graphics program I use, Paint Shop Pro, has a default
setting of 72 pixels per inch, but that setting is never used for anything as
far as I've been able to tell. If the image is viewed on a computer screen,
a measure of pixels per inch is purely dependant on the properties of the
monitor and video controller. If the image is printed, the settings of the
printer and specific settings for printing the page should override any
default setting of pixels per inch.

Make some reference images for your client to look at and tell you whether
they are acceptable quality. Images of the same type, such as photos of
people or charts and graphs, and the same number of pixels high and wide.
If your samples are not acceptable either, then your client may be asking
for something impossible with the techniques you are using. Like trying
to put a lot of detail into an image 16 pixels square.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#12
December 21, 2014 at 08:30:50
I might be reading you incorrectly but the implication is that your editing is causing this issue. Have you ever sent your client one that is not edited - could be interesting to find out if they will co-operate.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#13
December 21, 2014 at 13:28:33

I just noticed that the 6 files that were e-mailed to me were zipped into one zip file which turns into 6 compressed .PDF files of the following sizes:
1,662 KB
1,652 KB
1,525 KB
1,539 KB
3,686 KB
2,517 KB
I do not believe any of these files are very big but they are very detailed lots or commercial property images - like a parking lot with trees and building lots around each side.
I spent over 10 hours trying to find a clear image of even one image, inserted into a Word 2010 doc., the client said that each of them was too blurry. I am going to try the Gimp optioned mentioned - next on my list of trial software - and see what happens.


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#14
December 21, 2014 at 16:26:01
Wow, that's an important bit of information.

Firstly have you Saved the zip file attachment somewhere (rather than working inside email)? If not do so. When you double click on the saved zip file, copy the contents (six files) into some other spare folder. Anything could happen if you work on them inside the zip - they are only really suitable for "viewing" there.

Once you have then in another folder double click on each one there and ensure that they look OK. If so work on them in turn from there and with luck you should then get decent results.

Just for info, when you double click a zip file the contents still remain compressed in total by the zip, so that's why you can't/shouldn't work on them there.

EDIT:
You might then find that the Snipping tool (or maybe just Print Screen) and Paint will do what you want without any further degradation.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#15
December 21, 2014 at 16:31:05
I didn't re-read the thread to see if you already checked this...

When saving a file as .JPEG, you are always given a choice of
compression setting. The greater the compression, the smaller
the filesize and the lower the quality. If the setting is toward the
high compression end of the scale and you aren't changing it,
that's your problem. You need to choose a lower compression,
higher quality setting. I generally use a setting of 10 to 15 on a
scale of 1 to 99, where 1 gives the best quality and 99 gives
the smallest size.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#16
December 21, 2014 at 16:44:42
Quite right Jeff but I now suspect the main issue is due to them being worked on within the zip file, see #14. The originals are PDF files.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#17
December 23, 2014 at 15:04:19
I unzipped them and brought the PDF file into Adobe Acrobat XI Standard. I selected and cut off the extra text on the bottom left that I did not need as the client wanted as large a picture as possible in Word. I pasted as Paste Special into Word 2010 as a Bitmap. I selected the picture, right clicked on it and went down to Picture Corrections where I selected Sharpen and Soften and first selected 25% Sharpen and then finally 50% Sharpen for the blurring. I thought it ended up to be a pretty good picture but since I never knew why the client was not seeing what I was seeing, and not dealing directly with them, I never knew why any of the other pictures I sent were not acceptable as I mentioned before I tried all that other stuff with no success. I am wondering now if Word's 2010 Picture Correction for blurring would have been the final acceptable answer as I think it looks okay. BTW ... the PDFedit site or program has not got good reviews and also mentions it has a virus. Has anyone else tried Word 2010's Picture Corrections options with success?? You would think by this time no one would have to reinvent the wheel on the Word 2010 picture issue but it appears that there is not fast, really accurate answer to this problem which is what I was hoping for.

message edited by painthelper


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#18
December 23, 2014 at 15:33:48
If they look OK your end after you edit them and the client finds them blurred, then the problem can only be one of two things:

1. The way you are sending them.

or

2. The way the client is viewing them.

Most likely there is no problem on your computer or with your edits, in which case there can never be a "really accurate answer to a problem if it doesn't exist. There might of-course be better options, some of which have already been given.

There are two ways you can test the above. Send your client one which has not been edited and get his/her reaction. Assuming you are using email then the other way is to send "before and after" copies to yourself and see if they still look good when received.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#19
December 23, 2014 at 15:39:26
Okay, I will send myself before and after picture and see if they look any different as I have not thought of this since the very first picture came through e-mail as well - thanks again!

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#20
December 23, 2014 at 15:45:19
One possibility is that your client is somehow viewing the pictures at a significantly larger size than what you are sending. That would obviously cause blurring.

Working on the largest copies of pictures as possible all the way through is worthwhile, if you have that choice.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#21
December 23, 2014 at 17:14:24
painthelper wrote:

> I selected the picture, right clicked on it and went down to
> Picture Corrections where I selected Sharpen and Soften
> and first selected 25% and then finally 50% for the blurring.

This sounds totally crazy to me. Sharpen and soften are pretty
much opposite functions. Are you saying you are applying both
to the same picture? No good can come of that. I only sharpen
an image rarely, and am very careful not to sharpen it too much.
I don't recall ever softening an image. It is mostly something one
would do to produce an effect, rather than to improve the quality
of an image. I have played with both tools enough to know what
they do, and what they can do when they are overused. I don't
know how much softening "50%" is, but it sounds like a huge
amount. I expect that it is the cause of your problem. My wild
guess is that you aren't seeing the actual result of this softening
because Word is somehow showing you the unsoftened image.

Why are you sharpening the images? Why are you softening them?
If you are doing both to the same image, why are you doing that?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#22
December 23, 2014 at 17:55:02
Re #21

I agree entirely that using sharpen and soften together seems very odd, also that over-sharpening should be avoided. However the poster seems to be claiming that they are only blurred when received by the client and it seems hard to see why anything the sender does could cause that difference.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#23
December 23, 2014 at 18:06:16
Well, let's see. Do you have an image or picture you can take into Word 2010? If you do, when you select it and right click you will see the options offered - same as I do under the Pictures Correction options and, at the right, shown at the top you will see "Sharpen and Soften" . You will also see the 5 Thumbnail options offered - 3 of them on the right are for Sharpen - with a percentage - and 2 of them on the left are for Soften and a percentage. So if you do this same thing that I did you would have less questions about these same options as it would be immediately obvious to you, and anyone using this option, what is what. So perhaps you could do this and then get back to me otherwise nothing in my previous e-mail will have made absolutely any sense to you at all and it does not take long to do at all.

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#24
December 23, 2014 at 18:30:45
Sure the options are there but what #21 was querying is that both sharpen and Soften should not be applied to one document at the same time because they contradict. Soften (blur) is just about the opposite to Sharpen. Just because the options are there that doesn't mean it is a good idea to apply them both at once.

Just for info, if you are enlarging the image beyond its original size then it will blur as its size increases, and short of obtaining a larger original image there is nothing you can do about it.

Let us know what differences you see when you send these before and after efforts back to yourself. I would be surprised if each one is any more blurred than the way it left you, unless it comes back larger, but life can be full of surprises. It might tell us something.

I sense that you might be getting a tad cross but please bear in mind that all responses are written with the intent to help. That is the only reason we do this for free in our own spare time.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#25
December 23, 2014 at 19:36:54
Another thing, What you see on your monitor might not be the same as what you (or they) are printing. Try printing the same image a few ways (untouched, slightly sharpened, slightly blurred, and the combination you have been using) on high quality paper at the best setting for your printer and see what they look like. Try printing from Word, but also try printing the image itself from Windows Picture Viewer and see if it was Word that effected the image.
If you like, you can even bring a flash drive to a Fedex/Kinkos store and ask then for a high quality smooth card stock and to show you how to use one of their quality color copier/printers, load the paper and print out your examples. If the image is good, it should look like a professional printing job.

Is it necessary to have the image in Word? If not, then leaving it just in an image format for printing or layout software might be better.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#26
December 23, 2014 at 20:02:00
Yes, thanks, the image(s) must be put into a Word 2010 doc., no choices there and there are 10 of them. The reason I wrote this forum is that I assumed there must be at least one other person out there who has had to do this in Word 2010 and has struggled with it as much as I have but I guess not which was very surprising. I may end up buying Paintshop Pro X7 but will try a few more options first. I have just tried PIXILLION - an image convertor and am waiting for a response to that option (it was some free ware converter).

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#27
December 24, 2014 at 03:52:32
✔ Best Answer
painthelper wrote:

> at the right, shown at the top you will see "Sharpen and Soften"

I see that I misunderstood what you meant by "I selected Sharpen
and Soften and first selected 25% Sharpen and then finally 50%
Sharpen for the blurring" in post #17. "Sharpen and Soften" was
just the title of the sub-menu in Word, and you selected "Sharpen"
from that sub-menu. I still don't understand why you said "for the
blurring", or why you think sharpening helps your images. I just
looked at an image I've had for a while where a bit of sharpening
did improve its overall appearance, although even that modest
amount of sharpening caused visible pixel artifacts.

What Derek suggested in post #18 is essentially what I suggested
in post #11, to make some reference images for your client to say
whether their quality is acceptable, so you will know whether what
he is expecting can be accomplished with the methods you are
using, and so you can determine if there is a difference in quality
between the images you are altering and the reference images.

Either you and your client are seeing the same thing and have
different expectations of what the images should look like, or you
are seeing different things because you are each displaying the
images differently.

Extracting images from PDF files, use of image sharpening, and
re-saving JPEG images all raise red flags for me. Any of those
steps could degrade image quality. If you are also reducing or
enlarging them, that would almost certainly degrade their quality.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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