Solved what OS to use

January 15, 2020 at 14:26:03
Specs: Windows 7
I need some suggestions. I still have Windows 7 and am having issues choosing a replacement for its end of support! I don't trust Windows 10 at all because of it’s invasive ways but need a truly secure OS. I have tried Ubuntu but find it strange how there is not one antivirus option in the app store. I know Linux is safer but still am concerned. I have heard Avast has an anti virus for Linux but I am left wondering what is the best option. Would Linux truly be secure for the years to come with no antivirus or antimalware? How could I tell if there’s a threat in my system on a Linux? I don’t feel confident with a free antivirus as I’ve paid for antivirus for years on Windows.. Unfortunately I don't know anything on Linux systems so is it wise to take it instead if of Windows 10?

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✔ Best Answer
January 17, 2020 at 07:07:33
https://www.howtogeek.com/135392/ht...

If you still feel you need AV protection, don't pay for it. After installing Mint, you can use Software Manager (basically an App Store) & do a search for an AV program. ClamAV comes to mind but it's not a real-time scanner. If you want real-time protection, get Sophos. FYI, software installations in Linux can be tricky.
https://www.how2shout.com/how-to/ho...

You should learn how to do this as well: https://itsfoss.com/apt-get-linux-g...

And if you haven't been to Distrowatch, it's probably the best site to keep up with all the various Linux distributions & updates: https://distrowatch.com/



#1
January 15, 2020 at 14:49:51
How about going over to Macs?

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#2
January 15, 2020 at 15:35:43
Linux Mint has a Windows feel to it. There is a learning curve, so persevere.

http://linux.softpedia.com/get/Syst...
http://linuxmint.com/
Download (32-bit) page
http://blog.linuxmint.com/?p=2077
Download (64-bit) page
http://www.linuxmint.com/edition.ph...


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#3
January 15, 2020 at 18:55:55
If you're new to Linux, Ubuntu is a poor choice. As stated by Johnw, Linux Mint (which is based on Ubuntu) would be much better & easier to make the transition. You'll have to choose between 32-bit or 64-bit, plus pick a desktop environment (DE). Mint offers Mate, Cinnamon, or Xfce as the DE choices. Personally, I'm a fan of the Xfce DE. It's simpler & more lightweight than the other two.
https://linuxmint.com/rel_tricia_xf...

As for anti-virus, it's not an absolute requirement because the overwhelming majority of viruses & malware are meant for Windows & will not infect Linux. In fact, AV may even lessen security.
https://easylinuxtipsproject.blogsp...

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#4
January 17, 2020 at 00:09:54
Thanks for the advice on Mint. How do you all feel about Eset antivirus? I see its sold for Linux. Are they a trusted company or as good as Kaspersky/Bitdefender? I have thought of it lessening security as well but also wonder if a virus would actually need a prompt with a password to allow it to run which would show it’s presence immediately? Just an idea

I would like to know how. What if all the Windows 10 invasive settings were turned off and customized, would it not be a system resembling Windows 7 at least or just a local machine? Is diagnostic data set to basic and cortana turned off not enough? I would like to feel like this was more of a topic of the past before Microsoft responded to the concern in people by improving the system. Please let me know your thoughts

Thought I’d share this interesting article I just found as well
https://wtkr.com/2020/01/15/nsa-fin...

message edited by S87


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#5
January 17, 2020 at 07:07:33
✔ Best Answer
https://www.howtogeek.com/135392/ht...

If you still feel you need AV protection, don't pay for it. After installing Mint, you can use Software Manager (basically an App Store) & do a search for an AV program. ClamAV comes to mind but it's not a real-time scanner. If you want real-time protection, get Sophos. FYI, software installations in Linux can be tricky.
https://www.how2shout.com/how-to/ho...

You should learn how to do this as well: https://itsfoss.com/apt-get-linux-g...

And if you haven't been to Distrowatch, it's probably the best site to keep up with all the various Linux distributions & updates: https://distrowatch.com/


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#6
January 17, 2020 at 07:22:36
See this for some interesting claims about Win10: https://www.gnu.org/proprietary/mal...

The NSA connection is nothing new, check the date of this article: https://www.heise.de/tp/features/Ho...


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#7
January 17, 2020 at 16:10:41
I recently read an article that was quite intense on the subject of AV's and Linux. He stated that not only does Linux not need and antivirus program because a program of any kind would need you to enter your password in order to install it but in fact adding an antivirus program would open up a path for an infection to enter through. He stated that only an antivirus program would have the rights to open up/have access to all types of files where most programs are given access to one or two file types.
He further states that ONLY files officially listed/managed/approved for your distro of Linux should be installed and therefore completely safe from unintentionally installing something nasty.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#8
March 24, 2020 at 06:55:23
Ah, the good old Windows versus the World

It will prove to be if Windows 10 is as bad as it is stated, in the privacy area, or not. There's some things to take in mind:
1. If you are a US user, it appears you have that dreadful Cortana thing, while in Europe you don't. It's not just that, but Europe rules are more stricter when it comes to privacy invasion. So, are we talking a US or a Euro version, or even something else, as the world is bigger than that.

2. Do you use the machine for banking software ?

I'm not saying Windows is good or bad, but I would let those factor determine in your choice. Other OS need virus scanners a lot, but I can assure you that any OS needs a virus scanner, I don't care what the vendor says. But it is true, Windows, a base Windows, is much less protected than Linux or Mac.


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#9
March 24, 2020 at 07:13:23
> I recently read an article that was quite intense on the subject of AV's and Linux.
> He stated that not only does Linux not need and antivirus program

There's less need, but there is a need.

> because a program
> of any kind would need you to enter your password in order to install it

No, it can be installed as ANY user, since you can - and should - install it as another user,
not as any existing user.
Checkout out the "useradd" command.
After all, Linux/Unix - unlike Windows - is designed to be multi-user, and that is all excluding ROOT.
Any Linux easily has 10, 15 or 20 accounts, depending on the purpose.

> but in
> fact adding an antivirus program would open up a path for an infection to enter
> through.

That is true, in the way that the anti-virus itself would not have breaches to allow virusses to come in.
I could be wrong, but I don't think AV's are that dumb, but technically you are correct.
How many times have you heard of anti-virus programs being hacked ?
I'm not a hacker, but anti-virus is the last thing I would try to hack.

> He stated that only an antivirus program would have the rights to open
> up/have access to all types of files where most programs are given access to one
> or two file types.

Linux doesn't work with file types ... Stating it like that, he seems to be talking about Windows. Linux and Unix don't care about file types.
I'll give a clue: permissions.

> He further states that ONLY files officially listed/managed/approved for your
> distro of Linux should be installed and therefore completely safe from
> unintentionally installing something nasty.

I guess he is selling, only officially listed Linux ?


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#10
March 24, 2020 at 08:45:49
"Linux doesn't work with file types ... Stating it like that, he seems to be talking about Windows. Linux and Unix don't care about file types."

It most certainly does work with file types, as do all Unixes and Unix-like OSs. The "find" command even has a "-type" switch.

It may be that you meant "associations" rather than "types", but even then that would be incorrect. Linux has a richer implementation of file associations (associating a file with a particular application) than windows does.


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#11
March 24, 2020 at 11:18:14
> Linux has a richer implementation of file associations

Could you explain that a little bit? I have used Ubuntu some,
but not a lot, and it has been a while. Karmic Koala.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#12
March 24, 2020 at 11:52:49
This chapter from the Red Hat documentation gives a better explanation than I could.

https://access.redhat.com/documenta...


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#13
March 24, 2020 at 15:02:16
Think ewe.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#14
March 24, 2020 at 15:47:07
"This chapter from the Red Hat documentation gives a better explanation than I could"
Nice googling/searching ijack

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