Solved What is .NET Framework for?

July 8, 2012 at 20:43:57
Specs: Win 7
What is .NET Framework for?
When would someone need it or want it?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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✔ Best Answer
September 6, 2012 at 22:56:33
In answer to your original question .net framework is a large piece of software provided by Microsoft which allows software developers to write software using parts of it so that they don't have to write a complete package themselves. Generally it's the 'nuts & bolts' stuff so Microsoft's aim was to make sure that any software written at least conformed to basic rules of the system, something a developer may circumvent or ignore.

If you don't use software that was written using .net framework then it will obviously not be required, though the list must be getting quite small these days, especially as new software writers were brought up using Visual Studio which definitely requires .NF.
Things like newer versions of Microsoft Office would expect it to be installed, but I'm guessing that older versions may work quite happily without it, though I don't think Office 2000 will run natively on Windows 7.

So if you can happily run using non-Microsoft software then stick with it - I know that NF can and does cause issues and I, for one, would be more than happy if I didn't need it but that's not the case.

"I've always been mad, I know I've been mad, like the most of us..." Pink Floyd



#1
July 8, 2012 at 21:23:20
.NET Framework

You need it to run any code developed using .NET.

Tony, in Rochester


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#2
September 6, 2012 at 15:06:23
I want a better understanding than that. As an end user,
when, if ever, would I need .NET framework installed and
running on my computer?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#3
September 6, 2012 at 15:42:30
This is the same link as Tony gave you, I'm assuming you didn't click it as there is more info on that page about .NET than would ever need to know.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.NET_F...


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#4
September 6, 2012 at 18:14:17
I did look at that page. It doesn't answer my question. At least,
not in English. The page is written in Microsoftish. That's why it
took me so long to post a followup to my original question.

One of the few statements on that page that means anything in
English is:

"The .NET Framework is intended to be used by most new
applications created for the Windows platform."

I am running 64-bit Windows 7 Home Premium with SP-1.
As far as I have been able to see, it makes no difference to
anything whether .NET framework is installed or not. It is
currently not installed. All my software is running.

So I ask again: As an end user, when, if ever, would I need
.NET framework installed and running on my computer?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#5
September 6, 2012 at 19:53:21
It is currently not installed. All my software is running.

Thais because you are not running any software that requires .NET frame work. Not all applications written for Windows use the .NEt frame word.

If you do install an applicator does require .net frame work you will soon know about it.

Stuart


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#6
September 6, 2012 at 22:56:33
✔ Best Answer
In answer to your original question .net framework is a large piece of software provided by Microsoft which allows software developers to write software using parts of it so that they don't have to write a complete package themselves. Generally it's the 'nuts & bolts' stuff so Microsoft's aim was to make sure that any software written at least conformed to basic rules of the system, something a developer may circumvent or ignore.

If you don't use software that was written using .net framework then it will obviously not be required, though the list must be getting quite small these days, especially as new software writers were brought up using Visual Studio which definitely requires .NF.
Things like newer versions of Microsoft Office would expect it to be installed, but I'm guessing that older versions may work quite happily without it, though I don't think Office 2000 will run natively on Windows 7.

So if you can happily run using non-Microsoft software then stick with it - I know that NF can and does cause issues and I, for one, would be more than happy if I didn't need it but that's not the case.

"I've always been mad, I know I've been mad, like the most of us..." Pink Floyd


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#7
September 7, 2012 at 05:48:44
If you install a program that requires it, you will be told you need it and it may pause in the installation and probably bring up the appropriate .net installer or at least a link to it at Microsoft. You can wait until you need it. On my old XP I had 4 versions over the years and I have the latest on my W7 machine.
You can also get it through the optional Windows updates when you do a manual update if you like.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#8
September 8, 2012 at 08:14:43
To give you a specific example: I have an AMD gfx card. When I install the drivers and Catalyst software suite for it, the Catalyst software does not install unless you have .NET FRAMEWORK v2.0 installed. If you want the software for the graphics card, you must have the .net framework installed.

CoolGuy


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