Solved Wanted Windows Pro 7 received, System Builders Pack instead

Asus P4p800-e deluxe motherboard
February 20, 2014 at 16:06:21
Specs: Windows Vista, AMD Turion 64X2 1.90 Ghz 1983 MB RAM 32 Bit
I have an HP laptop with Windows Vista. This is the second time that I ordered Windows Pro 7 to make a clean install to replace the Vista and this is the second time that I receive OEM System Builder Pack intended for system builders only. Before I argue with this second seller, am I in the right to return this package saying that it is not the ideal version to install on my laptop or is this a full windows version that I can reinstall or repair is ever my laptop needs a replacement hard drive or any other hardware that may become defective. Thanks in advance for any advice.

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#1
February 20, 2014 at 17:14:55
✔ Best Answer
Yes, it is a full version of Windows 7. The only difference is that it is designed for people who are building a computer and intend to sell it to someone else (I.e. it isn't for end users like yourself). The only difference between a normal version and an OEM is that the OEM is a one time use. It cannot be transferred to another computer EVER, even if the first computer is no longer in use. For the most part, it is essentially the same as a regular version of Windows 7, although it depends if it'll be the same as Windows 7 Pro, and if it'll be 32 or 64 bit.

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#2
February 20, 2014 at 17:49:32
OEM is the same as Retail - except that you cannot use it another computer, once it's been activated on one computer already (as NT56erbx advises) - and while you can replace any component on that computer, and reactivate - you cannot change the motherboard and re-activate. If the board goes down/dies... the OEM version dies with it...

Mind you I have heard tales of M$ occasionally allowing a motherboard change, but wouldn't rely on it.

OEM discs are invariably much cheaper than Retail too; which is why they're quite populat - if one is able accept the restrictions...

message edited by trvlr


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#3
February 20, 2014 at 18:15:32
Just to elaborate a bit more, yes you can reinstall on a new hard drive if the drive dies. You also can make an image of the hard drive and put it on an external drive or DVD's and at some point in the future, use that to reimage the new drive, then update Windows and restore your current back up and you are back up and running faster than reinstalling. You just need to make a Repair Disk at the same time on a CD.
As mentioned, the install is tied to the motherboard, all other hardware can be changed/replaced as needed. About the only other difference is that Microsoft assumes that you purchased it from someone competent enough to be your tech support or do it yourself so that they may not offer the same phone support as the retail version. As far as I know, Microsoft is not currently shipping the retail version of Windows 7, they want you to purchase Windows 8, but they understand that there are serious computer people and businesses that need or want Windows 7 still. I purchased a spare copy for my next build to make sure I do not miss the chance. I DO use Windows 8 now at work and my wife's little laptop, but I prefer Windows 7 also.
I hope that this helps you.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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Related Solutions

#4
February 21, 2014 at 05:33:29
It's very simple to convert an OEM disc to the Retail version or vice-versa. All you need to do is edit or delete the ei.cfg file in the Sources folder. You can also change the version.

https://www.sctxca.org/suncity/club...

http://www.technibble.com/ei-cfg-re...

message edited by riider


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#5
February 21, 2014 at 05:52:15
mmm "riider" - wasn't aware that that still worked… tak...

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#6
February 24, 2014 at 16:29:29
System Builder is an OEM under a slightly different designation; but it's the same as OEM. They often (at least for XP) came in a padded pack and labelled as for system builders (I still have one/two XP packs like that unused; bought from a now closed store in SLC way back when…)

OEM = Original Equipment Manufacturer; typically Dell, HTP/Compaq, Asus to name but three…; and any local store that builds system to/for local specifications/customers etc.

Refurbished software (M$-branded) is the same as OEM; but is usually sold to those in the business of "refurbishing" older systems and wishing to install something a little newer (win-7 being the usual choice). The software itself is not refurbished - but the system it may be sold with (software installed already) is refurbished. Perhaps the title as Refurbished Software is a mis-nomer here? One is supposed to get the OS disk too; and then make one's own recovery disk...

Typically many "older" computer systems being refurbished were running XP, and are capable of running win-7 - albeit not as well as say a more current computer; but they will run it.

Retail is identical to OEM - unless it has been slightly tweaked/customised by one of the big names; Dell, HP/Compaq to name but two of them. If it has been "tweaked" then it "may" only install on a computer of their brand; although it seems that currently again some of it will install on any computer… (which is how it was in the olde days before M$ insisted the big names tweak the disk/software to disallow that…)

Where Retail and OEM (system builder/refurbished) software differ is in the level of support. Retail gets you a year's(?) M$ support. With OEM you either go back to whomever sold you the computer and/or software (if only the software) and they are your support..

The other difference - already mentioned in earlier responses here is that an OEM disc cannot be used to install on another (second, third etc.) computer and activated anew - once the OS has been registered/activated on the first computer. That disk is "tied" to the motherboard of the first installation done with that disk. When the motherboard dies… so does that disk. You would have to secure/obtain a new disk - OEM (flavours as above) or Retail.

A Retail disk "can" be installed again on another system, and activated… But usually you have stop using the first - or any previous installation. I say "usually" as M$ do appear nowadays to allow two installation active at the same time; one on a desktop and one on a laptop… (I leave you and the rest of the world to decided what you refer to as a desktop…) Again - you cannot re-activate an OEM installed to/via/on another motherboard…; you can only re-activate it on the system where it was first activated. Retail does not have this limitation…; so you can port the disk (use it to install afresh) to a new(er) system if needs-be.

Hopefully this clarifies the situation and puts your mind at rest…? I can understand/empathise with the confusions. One orders an OEM disk and gets one marked for System Builders, or even Refurbished Software… And there are still some disks out there simply marked OEM (and not badged by Dell etc.)

The main thing to consider is simply:

If you are happy/prefer to pay a lot less than that for retail - i.e get an OEM (whichever style it is - other than one branded by Dell etc.) and accept that it is "tied" to the motherboard which is involved when you activate the OS, (and cannot use it again anywhere else for whatever reasons - then fine. But if you want the flexibility of installing anew on another system go for Retail - but it costs more… and noticeably so these days… Finding Retail is getting harder as M$ apparently have stopped selling it directly; trying to force everyone onto win-8…

Personally I'd go OEM and accept the limitations as above. One could get two or three OEM for the price a reliable Retail (non pirated or scammed) version… Which having said I do have two Retail copies, and have used one on a Mac (dual-boot) and the other "may" will go onto an "elderly" Acer Aspire shortly. Equally I "may" use an OEM disk for the elderly Aspire, as when that system does fail (hopefully never - or at least for a loooooong time…) I will have had my money's worth out of that laptop and the OEM win-7… The other/second Retail copy will be useful anon however it pans out down the road...

As best I know "all" win-7 OEM (whichever "flavour") are win-7 Pro -unless otherwise stated.

message edited by trvlr


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#7
February 24, 2014 at 20:03:11
I have and you can purchase OEM's in Home Premium and Pro versions, just look up on Newegg.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#8
February 25, 2014 at 03:06:34
Fingers...

Tak for the that correction re' win 7 Home in OEM. Having only ever sought the Pro version (or Ultimate) wasn't aware of the more basic Home edition as an OEM...

Trvlr


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#9
February 25, 2014 at 19:59:05
trvir: You are welcome.
Jeannette: If you are satisfied your question is answered, please select a best answer to mark this question Solved.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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