Solved user profile can't be assessed

Toshiba Satellite c655-s5082 laptop
April 7, 2018 at 05:23:24
Specs: Windows 7, AMD 4 GB
The problem I experience concerns a Lenovo Edge bought 4 years ago, with Windows 7. Yesterday, after booting Windows loaded regularly and then, once I had keyed the password in, I get the message that that user profile cannot be accessed and that, if I wish to change the password, I can do so by inserting a USB with the software for changing passwords.

Any idea? That machine has always worked without problems.


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✔ Best Answer
April 7, 2018 at 16:38:55
What was suggested and apparently you did not understand was to insert the Windows 7 install disk, boot off of the install disk like you were going to reinstall but instead of reinstalling you are going to chose the Repair Option that will come up since there is a current installation. One of the repair options is the Start Up Repair and the second option (if I am correct about the order) is an option to do a System Restore. A system restore will use restore points on your hard drive, as long as system restore was turned on, but is driven off of the repair disk because you cannot access the primary installation but the repair option does have access to the restore points. This should restore all of the system to the way it was before the problem and should fix your issue. Make sure that you chose a date far enough back that it is not plagued by the problem again, I recommend at least a week (two weeks are better) back, maybe 2 restore points back, you may have to check off the 'see more restore points' box.

If you had made a password restore key onto a USB flash drive you would know it so apparently you do not have one saved somewhere. You may want to make one now for the future.

The System Restore and other repair options can also be accessed from a Windows 7 Repair Disk that was recommended that you also make but they can be made if necessary from any Windows 7 machine as long as both machines are either 32bit or both 64bit and use that. Since you have the install disk it should not be needed but you may want to make one for the future.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.

message edited by Fingers



#1
April 7, 2018 at 06:32:15

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#2
April 7, 2018 at 07:36:37
Before asking, I had done some searching with Microsoft. The solutions proposed with that link are impractical for me because the only option I am given is to insert a USB containing some kind of software for changing passwords.

I cannot do anything else, such as restarting Windows 7 in safe mode -- let alone modifying how users' accounts are configured. Incidentally, the account I cannot login into is the only one that exists in my computer.

At BIOS stage I can ask to shift the booting from the internal procedure to a self-boot USB with Windows 7 to be installed -- as I still have the original Windows 7. Losing all the data in the computer is not an issue because I am used to backing up all my production. But, still, that means re-installing Windows 7 from scratch, with the need to download all the updates of the last 4 years!

If someone can think of something smarter, I would much prefer. What about the software for changing passwords that is mentioned in the message saying that my user account cannot be accessed? It is worth noting that the system acknowledges the password I key in as correct because, if I type anything else, the message I receive is ‘wrong password’ and the option to change the password by means of a USB with software for changing passwords is not suggested at all.

Anyway, thank you for bothering about the link!


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#3
April 7, 2018 at 09:11:16
"Before asking, I had done some searching with Microsoft"

You didn't state that in your post. If you don't tell us everything you've tried, you're going to get answers that include those things. Did you try booting off your Win7 disc & then using System Restore to "go back in time" to before this problem started?


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#4
April 7, 2018 at 13:40:05
I have no means to do anything other than clicking on the link for changing the password via some software in a USB to be connected.

The usual options to restart Windows in safe mode or to revert to a prior configuration of Windows do not exist. All I see after logging in is the line stating that the attempt to connect to my user profile failed. If I type the password again, the same failure is reported and, in addition, a link appears for changing that password via the USB just mentioned. Of course, I can also click on the button for switching the computer off.

No other options are available. Never seen something like that.

message edited by rosv


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#5
April 7, 2018 at 16:38:55
✔ Best Answer
What was suggested and apparently you did not understand was to insert the Windows 7 install disk, boot off of the install disk like you were going to reinstall but instead of reinstalling you are going to chose the Repair Option that will come up since there is a current installation. One of the repair options is the Start Up Repair and the second option (if I am correct about the order) is an option to do a System Restore. A system restore will use restore points on your hard drive, as long as system restore was turned on, but is driven off of the repair disk because you cannot access the primary installation but the repair option does have access to the restore points. This should restore all of the system to the way it was before the problem and should fix your issue. Make sure that you chose a date far enough back that it is not plagued by the problem again, I recommend at least a week (two weeks are better) back, maybe 2 restore points back, you may have to check off the 'see more restore points' box.

If you had made a password restore key onto a USB flash drive you would know it so apparently you do not have one saved somewhere. You may want to make one now for the future.

The System Restore and other repair options can also be accessed from a Windows 7 Repair Disk that was recommended that you also make but they can be made if necessary from any Windows 7 machine as long as both machines are either 32bit or both 64bit and use that. Since you have the install disk it should not be needed but you may want to make one for the future.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.

message edited by Fingers


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#6
April 7, 2018 at 17:19:24
Many thanks to Fingers for the detailed clarification, and apologies to riider for having missed the suggestion. I had forgotten that, when installing Windows, we are given the possibility of repairing or requesting a system recovery. That is the way out I was hoping to find. Am grateful to both of you!

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