Solved Suggestions for good WiFi card for PC

Microsoft Book/cd: office outlook 2003...
December 20, 2013 at 05:34:31
Specs: Windows 7 Home, i7 / 4 GB
Cam someone recommend a GOOD FAST WiFi card for my stand alone PC. We have BT Fibre optic broadband and the hub will be in hall and PC in back room. Thanks

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✔ Best Answer
December 21, 2013 at 09:45:21
Yes you can use 3 powerline adapters - I've set up a system using 4 with no problems. The only stipulation is that they must all be on the same ring main (most houses will be unless it is divided into flats or has a large extension). You cannot think of them like wifi, there's no 'interference' involved - they are just like using individual LAN cables. If you want to be sure of the best throughput then go for 500Mbps ones - these will be more than adequate for internet use.

Another great way to use them is to extend the range of wifi. My wife has a music room at the bottom of the garden (about 100ft away and soundproofed(!) ) and we have a networking adapter down to that & then a cheap router set up as a wireless access point - works flawlessly.

Article with more information about them here: http://www.pcadvisor.co.uk/buying-a...

"I've always been mad, I know I've been mad, like the most of us..." Pink Floyd

message edited by johnr



#1
December 20, 2013 at 06:15:09
If it is a standalone PC then your better option would be using mains networking. Twinpack sets start at £25, they are simply plug-in & play and just do the job - far more stable than a wifi signal and faster speeds.

"I've always been mad, I know I've been mad, like the most of us..." Pink Floyd


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#2
December 20, 2013 at 07:08:13
If you must use Wi-fi then make sure you get a 808.11n compatible card then you will get the maximum benefit from the BT Home Hub 4 If possible get one that is dual channel then that will give to access to the 5Mhz channel and more bandwidth at the expense of range.

But as Johnr says, wired is always the better choice when ever possible.

Stuart


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#3
December 20, 2013 at 13:00:11
So mains networking means a unit plugged into hall mains and cabled to hub then same in back room and cabled to computer? If so what are the best? Thanks

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#4
December 20, 2013 at 13:49:15
Just thought can't use mains networking as m as ind networking is from hub in hall to tv box in front room. Two signals would conflict. Please send link for realy good pc card please. Thanks

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#5
December 20, 2013 at 16:28:12
I don't understand what you mean by the two signals would conflict.

The way to do it if to connect the hub to a power adaptor in the hall. The from the power adaptor in the living room connect a 5 port switch. Then you can connect up to four devices to the switch, including the TV is it has an Ethernet connection.

A 5 port switch is not expensive

http://www.amazon.co.uk/TP-Link-TL-...

Stuart


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#6
December 21, 2013 at 05:08:27
Sorry if I have been so confusing. I have a stand alone PC in my back room, a TV with vision box in front room and telephone line/Hub into house in the hall. The BT box has to connect somehow to the vision box so I would use the mains adapters. One behind the television with cable to vision box the other with cable from mains box to Hub. If I use a third mains adapter in my back room and cable to the computer that then is different data from what is being sent to my vision box.
Am I right or wrong?

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#7
December 21, 2013 at 07:50:08
The answer to that question is I don't know. I have never used three power line adaptors together so I couldn't say whether it would work or not.

Stuart


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#8
December 21, 2013 at 09:45:21
✔ Best Answer
Yes you can use 3 powerline adapters - I've set up a system using 4 with no problems. The only stipulation is that they must all be on the same ring main (most houses will be unless it is divided into flats or has a large extension). You cannot think of them like wifi, there's no 'interference' involved - they are just like using individual LAN cables. If you want to be sure of the best throughput then go for 500Mbps ones - these will be more than adequate for internet use.

Another great way to use them is to extend the range of wifi. My wife has a music room at the bottom of the garden (about 100ft away and soundproofed(!) ) and we have a networking adapter down to that & then a cheap router set up as a wireless access point - works flawlessly.

Article with more information about them here: http://www.pcadvisor.co.uk/buying-a...

"I've always been mad, I know I've been mad, like the most of us..." Pink Floyd

message edited by johnr


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#9
December 21, 2013 at 12:21:38
The only stipulation is that they must all be on the same ring main (most houses will be unless it is divided into flats or has a large extension)

Be aware that some domestic properties in the UK, especially larger ones, with have a separate ring main for the upper and lower floors

Stuart


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