Son did something, wiped out profiles?

October 13, 2013 at 12:32:07
Specs: Windows 7
My wife went to log on to her Toshiba 655 Laptop (Windows 7) and found the usual screen with the profiles and avatars had been replaced with the same screen but with one blank avatar and boxes for username and password.

We have tried every combination we can think of and nothing works. She did not make a recovery disk.

Do I try a password recovery program or is this something different?


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#1
October 13, 2013 at 15:56:09
First thing to do is ask your son what he did. Ask him for the user name and password he used.

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#2
October 13, 2013 at 16:01:15
Restart in Safe mode and try a System Restore to a date that you know everything worked correctly. If he just 'did something', it should work.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#3
October 13, 2013 at 16:04:03
He doesn't know what he did plus he isn't able to input usernames and passwords. We do that for him so he can watch videos on You Tube.

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#4
October 13, 2013 at 16:09:11
Will I be able to do that without being able to get past the login screen?

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#5
October 13, 2013 at 16:14:15
Tried but without a username or password can't get in to do it.

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#6
October 14, 2013 at 11:33:31
Try restarting and tap F8 during boot up, you should get a list of boot options and 'Safe Mode' should be on the list. Select this and see if it will boot into safe mode.
In the future, when you create a limited use account on a system for a child, you also need to create another account with full administrative privileges for the adults for clean up, repair, and to adjust the child's level of access (parental controls). Even for an older child or an adult who is not the 'superuser', there are serious advantages to using an non-admin privileged account for everyday usage and always having the admin access for correcting things. With a non-admin account, you will be asked to enter a password (the admin password) before being allowed to install anything or even uninstalling something important and account level changes will not be allowed. This will prevent the accidental installation of a lot of malware.

Please try above to access Safe Mode and report back.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#7
October 15, 2013 at 12:23:55
I booted into safe mode and safe mode with networking on a second try. Still gives me the login screen with blank avatar and a slightly larger cursor. I created two different password recovery discs from my computer (PC Login and one with a really long name). Changed the boot sequence to cd/dvd but can't get the cd to boot on start up.

I was the administrator but when we got the second laptop I took it and removed my profile from the problem computer.


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#8
October 15, 2013 at 12:42:21
You can boot to a Windows 7 repair Disk and initiate the System Restore from there (outside of Windows proper) which will use your stored restore points and should allow you to fix this problem. If you did not make the Repair Disk yet, you can make it from any other Windows 7 machine as long as both are either 32bit or 64bit and use that. You make it from the Back up section in Windows and you just need a blank CD-r.
If you have problems booting to a CD or DVD you may need to access the BIOS and make sure that the CD/DVD drive is first in boot order. You also may need to 'hit any key' during boot up to access the CD/DVD boot option.

I do not know that a password recovery disk will work when the profile is missing, but the System Restore should be able to restore the system to the state it was before, as long as you go back fat enough in time. Note that there is a check box to allow you to see more restore points to back earlier if needed

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#9
October 15, 2013 at 12:52:01
I can make the repair disc from mine but won't that install my system on her machine?

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#10
October 15, 2013 at 15:51:51
No, a repair disk does not contain your OS like a recovery disk, but you can do a Start Up Repair, a System Restore, and you can restore a saved disk image. The System Restore will use the stored restore points on his hard drive and a restore disk image is usually one you previously stored typically on an external drive.
So, yes, you can use the repair disk from your computer on his computer as long as both are 32bit or both 64bit and the restore will be from his hard drive where all of his restore points are stored. The repair disk is not otherwise system specific.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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