Solved Questions about Windows Update

April 30, 2015 at 20:14:18
Specs: Win 7
It has been a few days since I did this so I may not recall the names exactly.

When I have Windows Update search for updates, it takes 10-15 minutes, then
puts up links to important Windows updates (~127 of them) and recommended
updates (~55 of them).The first time I did this those two lists were saved, so
that I could open Windows Update and look at them again, and easily click on
the links for details of each update. But the last few times I've tried to do that, it
either started searching again from the beginning or complained that it needed
to connect to the Internet.

Is there a way to make sure the downloaded lists are saved?

Is it possible to save the updates themselves, so that I don't have to download
all of them again the next time I install Windows from scratch?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


See More: Questions about Windows Update

Report •

#1
May 1, 2015 at 06:36:28
I always disable Windows Automatic Updates because they are a damn nuisance and it's not unusual for a an update to screw Windows up (very common in fact). I disable them first thing after every fresh Windows install.

You don't the security updates as long as you have a good, strong third-party firewall (not the Windows one).

Do yourself a favour and disable automatic updates.

When you want to update a MS application or download an MS utility, visit the MS downloads website at your convenience.


Report •

#2
May 1, 2015 at 08:31:04
phil22: it's not unusual for a an update to screw Windows up (very common in fact) [citation needed]

Jeff Root: It sounds like you had auto-download, but don't install enabled. If that were the case, once all of the updates downloaded, your list of updates would be generated from those pending updates. That would give the appearance of a persistent list until you acted on the list.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way

message edited by Razor2.3


Report •

#3
May 1, 2015 at 10:19:25
✔ Best Answer
Jeff

Once your system is current you shouldn't see more3 than 10 or less weekly updates. I have my system set to notify me that updates are available. I usually wait a couple of days before actually installing any of them. I do not allow MS to feed me any hardware drivers.

You can download needed updates individually but you would have to make a list of identified updates required for YOUR system. There are many more updates available than needed for your configuration.

Much less trouble to just maintain images of you C partition at the very least.

Now service packs are a different animal. You CAN download and save them. That is a sound method to future proof your system. One place to get everything discussed is at the link below.

https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us...



Report •

Related Solutions

#4
May 1, 2015 at 11:35:01
It is possible to obtain manual Windows Update files but you would need to know the KB numbers. Seems likely that they have already been installed but it is possible to obtain a list of installed updates so you could check this out.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


Report •

#5
May 1, 2015 at 12:59:57
Razor2.3,

I did not have auto-download enabled. I went into the Windows Update
control panel and clicked the "Check for updates" button. It then spent
ten to fifteen minutes getting two lists of updates, which it put links to on
that control panel window. The top one was a list of important Windows
updates, and the one below it was other recommended updates. About
127 updates in the first list and 55 in the second.

The first time I did this I was able to open the Windows Update control
again the next day, and the two links, along with the lists, were still there.
I could click on an update and some limited info about it appeared in the
upper-right corner, and then I could click a button for much more detailed
info online.

But since that first time, whenever I close the WU control and re-open it
later, it either starts the whole search from scratch or complains that it
isn't connected to the Internet. I have tried re-opening the control both
while connected and while disconnected.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

message edited by Jeff Root


Report •

#6
May 1, 2015 at 13:07:38
I think it is quite normal for Windows Update to do the whole search again if you go back later and use Check or Updates. All my computers do this.

You need to be connected to the internet because it uses that to check the computer and determine the update state. Nothing about an "update check" is stored on your computer.

If you go to Windows Update there is a "View Update History" link which will tell you if those updates have somehow been put in, provided you have an idea what they were or their KB numbers.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


Report •

#7
May 1, 2015 at 13:31:23
The two lists of important and recommended updates *were* stored on
my computer.

I didn't click the "Check for updates" button again when I went back
into the Windows Update control the next day. Both links were already
there, with the lists available. Then, after connecting to the Internet, I
could click the button to get detailed info online.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


Report •

#8
May 1, 2015 at 14:31:13
"I didn't click the "Check for updates" button again when I went back
into the Windows Update control the next day
"
Aha, that bit I had not understood, I assumed you had hit "Check for updates".

I also use CCleaner regularly on all my computers so that might have some bearing on my situation.

There are some mysteries about Windows Update. Often when I go on there just one or two updates show. When I do Check for updates its not unusual for more to then arrive. Again, maybe CCleaner comes into play - not sure.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


Report •

#9
May 1, 2015 at 16:16:13
I believe that if you have the system check for updates regularly (Not download or install), it keeps a regular schedule (probably daily). If you open the manual update window within that period then you will see the same updates, if you open the windows after that, you will see those updates and probably a few more at the bottom of the list as long as you have constant internet access. If the machine tries to do the timely updates and is not able to then it may require you to do the scan again so it does not show you a 'stale' list that might not be completely relevant.
I believe that you cannot easily and probably should not save updates in a folder to install as needed with reinstalls because your system has changed and some of those might not be relevant at the time (due to other programs and updates). You should always scan for updates before installing any updates so there is less potential for conflicts.
I recommend installing ALL important and security updates manually about once a week, I believe that this is the most secure way to go. I do not believe that 3rd party firewalls are better than Windows Firewall (at least since about Windows XP) so I stay with that. The few that I tried over the years have not been better in my opinion, just more annoying.
Finally, (and this was very briefly mentioned above), I recommend keeping an image of your C Drive that is within say 6 months old so that instead of reinstalling from scratch, getting your updates, reinstalling your programs, and setting up your personal settings, you just reimage the drive if it ever becomes necessary and in half the time of a clean install, you are done and nearly up to date. I keep a C drive partition large enough for my OS and programs, or an SSD drive large enough for my C drive with OS and programs, and a larger partition or drive for my data. This way the data is protected by my back ups and the C drive is ultimately protected by my drive image. I personally keep an extra internal hard drive partitioned as first an image drive and second a back up drive. I also keep copies of important files on other computers on my home network as a secondary back up. This allows me to automate the back up so I cannot forget to plug in my back up drive and have everything always at hand. Yes, I know that to be completely secure you should have back up drives disconnected most of the time and many would go as far as disconnecting from the internet and scanning the system before updating back ups, but this is I believe excessive for me and probably would not then get done as regularly as it should be.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


Report •

#10
May 1, 2015 at 17:03:18
Re #9
The first part might well be the reason for my situation (last para #8) because I ask Windows to let me know about updates but always install them manually. This is once a week unless I get an MS popup.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


Report •

#11
May 1, 2015 at 20:08:55
Derek wrote:

> I also use CCleaner regularly ...

Aha! I use it irregularly. It is entirely possible that I ran CCleaner between
checking for updates and the next time I opened WU, and the possibility
that CCleaner might remove the lists or something required for them to
be displayed didn't occur to me. Even though I do generally look through
the list of stuff that CCleaner says it will (or did) delete.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


Report •

#12
May 1, 2015 at 20:25:56
Regarding firewalls:

I have Windows firewall running. When I was using a dialup Internet
connection, and I had extensively modified the settings to make it as
stealthy as possible (though I'm not sure that made any difference),
GRC's "ShieldsUP!" port sniffing found that all of the first 1056 ports
(and more) were stealthed. Now, using a broadband modem/router
with a hardware firewall in front of Windows Firewall, GRC reports
one open port and two closed (not stealthed) ports.. I haven't been
able to find out why they are that way or what effects they might have.
The open port is 53 (domain), the closed ports are 113 (ident) and
161 (snmp). The modem/router does not appear to provide any way
to stealth any of those three ports.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


Report •

#13
May 1, 2015 at 21:50:22
I ran CCleaner and won't run it again until after I find out whether WU will
keep the lists of updates. I see that the first list is called "Important" and
the second is called "Optional". There are now 62 of the latter.

This time the check for updates was much quicker-- only four minutes.
I wonder why.

One of the Important updates-- the next-to-last of the 127 listed-- is SP1,
which is already installed. The checkbox for it is checked, too. I wonder
why it is listed. Maybe some tweaking I did makes WU think some parts
of it are missing.

Edit:

No joy. The lists were gone when I re-opened Windows Update.
I was careful to do it before midnight, too, so it wouldn't think a whole
day had gone by and thus needed to refresh them. More like an hour.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

message edited by Jeff Root


Report •

#14
Report •

#15
May 2, 2015 at 07:23:33
Interesting utility riider. As for the remark on there about keep having to reboot I rather doubt it is necessary. The registry entries would have been made, just need to reboot once at the end so that they are picked up. In any event not all updates require a reboot.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


Report •

#16
May 2, 2015 at 07:36:08
Jeff, I believe that MS releases updates each Tuesday. I usually wait a couple of days before downloading them.

Report •

#17
May 2, 2015 at 07:43:22
Yes, traditionally MS released updates on the second Tuesday of each month, known as "Patch Tuesday". However, recently it seems that (on Win 8.1 at least) they are now pushing a lot updates updates between those Tuesdays. Looks like their policy is changing.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


Report •

#18
May 2, 2015 at 08:49:52
"Looks like their policy is changing"

Or maybe their failed OS is just in constant need of repair? Bring on Windows 10!

http://www.neowin.net/news/windows-...


Report •

#19
May 2, 2015 at 09:16:24
I've found Win 8.1 very reliable indeed - that is definitely not the problem.. Many of the updates are optional and all sorts of obscure things such as languages, which I don't happen to need, although other parts of the world would think differently. It's the interface change that hit many folk hard because they hankered after the W95 style start menu. I accept that view even though it's not mine. Win 10 will sort that hopefully, although it will still be somewhat different.

I do think its a pity MS didn't pander to their customers and put back the start menu back as part of the Win 8.1 upgrade. Much better to sell new systems I guess and once a number or name gets a bad name it sticks - justified or not.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


Report •

#20
May 2, 2015 at 12:29:37
I use Belarc audit, to find every thing in my computer, This free down load will locate all of your windows updates and security down loads and list them and it will also list the ones you will need, including the hot fixes. OK.
I hope that will help you, otherwise you'll have to speak with Old Bill Gates through the portal of the Grave. :)

Report •

#21
May 2, 2015 at 14:30:49
OldManExuma

All installed updates are listed in Programs and Features in Windows 7, Slightly different label in other versions. No need for a third party app. Belarc "Advisor" is a useful app though.


Report •

Ask Question