Solved Problem w/ power supply or system?

April 24, 2012 at 10:21:24
Specs: Windows 7
So I have an intel 946 GZAB MoBo win7 OS and i think it has a built in video card.Recently I installed ATI Radeon x1650 but it has some issues regarding the display after installing some ATI Drivers. It also turns off automatically when Im using it. So i decided to remove the graphics card and placed my Unit as it was before.

Now I discovered that when Im using ctrl + c/v (i havent tried any commands) it also turns off the unit, just turned off. Also there are some cases that it is not opening when i press the power switch from the system unit. I dont know whats the problem, my dads gonna fry me xD


See More: Problem w/ power supply or system?

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✔ Best Answer
May 1, 2012 at 05:08:56
Very possible. Testing it would be best unless you have another you can swap in for testing. You may be able to find someone who is willing to sell you a new one under the condition that if it does not solve the problem you could return it.
Most 300 Watt Power supplies should handle your system but if you plan on adding a decent video card you may want to look for something between 500Watt and 600Watt. The video card you tried appears to be a low end card if it is not defective it will have low requirements. The thing you want to look for is:
A single 12 Volt rail (not multiple 12Volt outputs)
80% certified efficiency rating or better
Active PFC
A name brand with good customer reviews (see newegg.com at least for the reviews)
Look at these:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.



#1
April 24, 2012 at 10:30:22
Please please post your power supply make, model & specs. The PSU might be first component to troubleshoot.

Google is your friend

www.google.com

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Have a GREAT day!


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#2
April 24, 2012 at 10:51:58
I dnt know . All i see is a box with 8v sticker.

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#3
April 24, 2012 at 11:46:09
Recheck all the connections. It often happens that you may have accidentally disconnected a power cable while trying to install the card.

You may have burned the PSU because of too much load on it, too.

CoolGuy


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Related Solutions

#4
April 24, 2012 at 12:07:28
I wound not rely on a PSU that has nothing but 8V sticker on it. Once you check the cable connections, trying a different, known-to-be-good PSU is next.

Google is your friend

www.google.com

-----------------------

Have a GREAT day!


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#5
April 24, 2012 at 18:28:46
To find the power supply's specs you need to open the case since the label with the most details will be inside BUT may not show without removing it. Most power supply makers are proud of their specs and place them where they will show as soon as you open the side of the case, if they are there but placed where it will be hidden when installed, it is not a good sign. If the entire system was built overseas, it is possible that they may have got away without this piece of important information, but that is a REALLY bad sign as to the quality of the unit.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#6
April 30, 2012 at 07:14:28
Sorry for late reply .. Here's my PSU. Is it right?
http://i.imgur.com/WozUU.jpg

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#7
April 30, 2012 at 21:19:53
It appears to say it is a 600Watt model but it also says ATX-300 which would be typical of a 300Watt model. Your 12Volt Rail is listed as 18Amps which is definitely not a 600Watt model so I would treat it as a cheap 300Watt model.
The label lists the wire colors and the voltages so you can try to verify that you have the correct voltages at least at the 12Volt, the 5Volt and the 3.3Volt wires at the connector with a digital volt meter. Even a decent analog meter could tell you if it is dead (no reading on one set or more), dying (Low reading on one or more), or disaster (very high readings) which might have damaged other hardware.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#8
May 1, 2012 at 03:00:51
So the culprit is the PSU unit ? What kind of psu spec should i replace ?

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#9
May 1, 2012 at 05:08:56
✔ Best Answer
Very possible. Testing it would be best unless you have another you can swap in for testing. You may be able to find someone who is willing to sell you a new one under the condition that if it does not solve the problem you could return it.
Most 300 Watt Power supplies should handle your system but if you plan on adding a decent video card you may want to look for something between 500Watt and 600Watt. The video card you tried appears to be a low end card if it is not defective it will have low requirements. The thing you want to look for is:
A single 12 Volt rail (not multiple 12Volt outputs)
80% certified efficiency rating or better
Active PFC
A name brand with good customer reviews (see newegg.com at least for the reviews)
Look at these:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#10
May 1, 2012 at 21:26:33
THank you for your answer, i'll be taking my system unit to a technician since i don't have enough knowledge on PSU units. I will replace my PSU unit with the properties you mentioned

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