power surge computer don't respond to any program

February 18, 2012 at 22:52:36
Specs: Windows 7
Had a power surge today and computer was plug in a strip. Now computer won't respond to any programs when it get turned on.

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#1
February 18, 2012 at 23:23:52
your going to have to elaborate a little more, the computer powers on? What is it exactly doing?

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#2
February 18, 2012 at 23:28:06
By the word strip, I take it to mean power surge strip. Power surge strips can do their jobs only in a properly-grounded environments. Therefore, please check if the wall outlet, to which your computer is plugged in, is grounded according to the electrical specifications. Also note that not all power surge strips are made equally.

CoolGuy


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#3
February 19, 2012 at 15:00:21
I recommend using a UPS rather than just a surge protector, but as Suatcini said, a no name power strip or surge protector power strip purchased for price alone or at a local pharmacy is not the same as a quality name brand model sold by the computer retailer.
A UPS or Uninterruptable Power Supply has a quality surge protector but also includes a battery back up that will ensure positive clean power, even for short power failures, giving you time to safely save and shut down. Better models can even safely shut down unattended.

Try restarting your computer again and see if that helps.
Try restarting in Safe Mode and doing a System Restore.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#4
February 20, 2012 at 08:37:27
Describe what you can do, if anything, with the computer. From your original post it sounds like you are getting into Windows.

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#5
February 20, 2012 at 09:27:32
After the power surge i went through the test:failed Testing :WDC Wd15EARS-00Z5B1-CWD-WMAVY1277295-Drive
Error code : BIOHD-8

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#6
February 20, 2012 at 19:00:10
Use the Western Digital hard drive utility (burnable to bootable CD) or the Seatools from Seagate (universal in nature) to test the hard drive and see if it can be repaired through that. If either reports the hard drive is bad, you will need to replace it. You will then need your Windows 7 install disk or a full recovery disk set from the machine manufacturer to reinstall Windows 7 onto the new hard drive, unless you made an image of the hard drive and have a recent back up to recover your drive and your files.
If your area is prone to power problems, consider a UPS as I mentioned above (for the future), or at least get a better surge protector strip with a hardware warranty. Also consider getting (if you do not already have one) an external hard drive to keep a drive image and current back ups on and make yourself a Windows 7 Repair Disk (in the back up section) to allow some repairs (Start up repair, external system restore, etc.) and restoring from the image.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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