Poor performance after upgrade Vista to Win 7

Acer / 7520
December 24, 2009 at 06:20:44
Specs: Win7 Premium, AMD x2/4GB
Hi all, hoping someone could shed some light on what could be going on here. I upgraded my Vista laptop to Windows 7 - never really had a problem with Vista, but after using 7 at Beta and RC, I decided I would be getting it due to the better overall performance.

I did the upgrade when I received my copy in October, and for the first couple of months performance was great, and still is but only after switch on - after about 45mins/an hours worth of web browsing, IM chat and e-mailing (which is all I use it for really) the system really slows down. This is with or without Aero turned on (Aero runs fine when first starting up, but when the slow down starts to happen, it performs very slowly)

I don't understand it, I have 4GB RAM which is all being utilised (x64 edition) and plenty of disk space free. One thing I have noticed is the slow down often coincides with the laptop fan making tonnes more noise than usual, so whether it's overheating, I don't know but hopefully someone can offer me some advice!

Many thanks and Happy Christmas all,

Alex


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#1
December 24, 2009 at 07:54:34
If you installed Win 7 over Vista, that may have been causing you slow performance.

Suggestion: Clean install with upgrade media.

Regards

SuatCINI


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#2
December 24, 2009 at 08:34:47
Upgrading an Operating System mostly comes along with several problems.

Therefor as suatcini stated, installation from scratch is the best option.


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#3
December 24, 2009 at 10:20:36
I agree with the above responses when an upgrade is done in that you are better with a clean install. I am not real experienced with laptops but have been told overheating can cause a good slow down. You say it's good for a while after start up? Does it get better if you reboot or just after it has been shutdown for a bit?

Likely


I want to go like my grandfather did. Peacefully in his sleep. Not screaming at the top of my lungs like the passengers in his car.

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Related Solutions

#4
December 24, 2009 at 13:37:01
Your laptop might be throttling - they are by default setup to do so. You might need to check your power settings.

Windows 7 News!


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#5
December 25, 2009 at 01:12:13
Check Task Manager processes tab to see what is eating up your CPU cycles such that CPU fan starts to spin noisily.

Name that process which uses the highest CPU percentage. Maybe we can comment on what is going on.

Choose the appropriate version, i.e. 32-bit or 64 bit. If you want the standalone program, download the zipped program and unzip it.

Happy new year.

Regards

SuatCINI


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#6
December 26, 2009 at 09:01:48
Thanks for the replies, guys.

Probably should have mentioned that I did wipe my laptop before installing Windows 7 as a fresh install. I never do upgrades for the reasons listed above.

What is 'throttling' and where is it in the power settings?

Also, if I do a reboot it seems ok again for a bit. I'm wondering if I have a rogue driver somewhere.

Thanks,

Alex


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#7
December 26, 2009 at 10:01:46
Do as I said in response # 5 and find the culprit.

Some process is eating up either your CPU cycles or memory or both.

Regards

SuatCINI


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#8
December 26, 2009 at 13:30:10
"What is 'throttling' and where is it in the power settings?"

It depends...

Thermal throttling is what a CPU does when its temperature climbs to a pre-determined level & what happens is: the CPU downclocks its processing power to idle level state in an attempt to cool itself down.

Unfortunately, you cannot do much about that (software-wise) other than to ensure the system is not easily susceptible overheating: My suggestion is to keep the machine dust-free & properly ventilated or get a laptop cooler if the machine is not new or if it has a history of overheating.

SpeedStep throttling on the other hand, is where your machine downclocks usually by lowering the CPU multiplier & voltage in order to conserve battery life & reduce heat dissipation, if the machine is in a prolonged state where low processing power is required. The machine typically ramps up if more processing power is required. You can disable this setting from the BIOS if you prefer your machine to run at full bore all the time, but it makes very little sense to do so on a notebook.

As far as the power options, you need to ensure your machine is configured appropriately based on what you use the machine for.

Windows 7 News!


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#9
December 26, 2009 at 23:28:57
There is a standalone program called CPUZ that gives you info about your CPU and the state the CPU is in when you open the program. You can see if your CPU is throttling or not.

http://www.cpuid.com/cpuz.php

Regards

SuatCINI


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#10
December 28, 2009 at 08:50:35
Me again guys!

I have had a look in Task Manager when the slow down occurs and there seems to be no culprit.

I have had CPUZ for a while, where would it tell me if my CPU is throttling?

Also, what's a good program to use to monitor CPU/system temperature?

Many thanks


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#11
December 28, 2009 at 17:51:03
Alex2002,

Download Core Temp it's a good tool for monitoring your system temperature. Use it to compare your idle temperature to the load temperature.

Windows 7 News!


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#12
January 19, 2010 at 12:54:42
Any one loading win 7 over old operating system...creates a winxx.old,which can be 10-60 gigs.One can delete that file after setup.

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#13
January 19, 2010 at 13:02:21
One simple check for anyone that has a high throttle fan speed,check your bios setup in power,make sure your Q-fan is (enabled) and your cpu fan is (DC).

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