Solved Perform Win7 System recovery - good or not so good to do?

May 3, 2014 at 18:17:56
Specs: Windows 7, 2.7 ghz 6.00
Once in a while, I get a pop up reminding me to perform a 'system recovery' and states it is highly recommended. It's suggested I do it myself or I can go to: www.hp.com/support/systemrecovery and they will but I haven't checked into that. I've checked various sites pertaining to this and many claim there are problems. I don't know if I should do this or not. Each time the reminder pops up, I just check 'remind me later' and been doing that the past 8 or 9 times. Just wondering. Thanks

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#1
May 3, 2014 at 18:42:06
There is already a recovery partition on the hard drive. It's up to you if you want recovery CDs or not. Go to that site, read what they have to offer & make a decision. I ordered recovery CDs for my win 7 laptop from Lenovo. That's another choice that they may offer.

The world is full if rats, Republicans & Democrats.


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#2
May 3, 2014 at 18:54:03
Any time you get pop-ups like that they are usually unwanted malware.
Just to satisfy your curiosity why not do a quick scan with malwarebytes & fix all it finds...It won't hurt to do that...
http://filehippo.com/download_malwa...

I have never heard of a legit popup that says you should do a system recovery when it's not needed...


HELP in posting on Computing.net plus free progs and instructions

message edited by XpUser4Real


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#3
May 3, 2014 at 19:06:35
✔ Best Answer
Those reminders are coming from 'HP recovery manager". It might be prompting you to do a backup rather than a recovery since it wouldn't have any reason to suggest a recovery. Here's some details:

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/...

It might be a good idea to do a backup and I think that would stop the reminders for awhile. If not there may be an option to turn off the reminders in the recovery software settings.


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#4
May 4, 2014 at 03:21:12
And also keep in mind that a system recovery (the process that sets your computer back to the factory delivery state - as it was when you acquired it) "will" erase all your personal files - the "stuff" you really wouldn't want to lose... So very wise to ensure you have valid copies of all that "stuff" elsewhere - off the system entirely. Typically to DVD and if possible an external hard drive; and as DVD discs are cheap... Make two sets and storevsafely in different locations.

Also ensure you have a record of "all" installation keys for any software you installed after you acquired the computer. Hard copy, and also email it yorself too; the latter providing a form of (free and resaonably safe, secure and easy access) cloud storage.

Note I use the word copy with respect to "stuff" not backup. A copy can be easily accessed and read by any compatible OS, whereas a backup neds a little more effort, and "may not" be accessible by some systems...

Belarc advisor will produce a full record (printable too) of what's installed. As will the MS built-in msinfo32 routine which is run from the start\run box


https://www.google.co.uk/?gfe_rd=cr...

That's all one link... But truncated/broken here in posting.


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#5
May 4, 2014 at 05:39:40
In addition to a 'copy' I do recommend a Windows 7 Back up should be made as well as a System Image made along with the back up (portable hard drive). Then you make a Windows 7 Repair Disk (CD) which is a very important tool. A System Image will allow you to rebuild your system completely to exactly the condition it is in at this exact moment, even if the hard drive just suddenly dies, you make a major screw up, or get a root infection that cannot be removed without a full wipe. The Repair Disk will allow you to do a Start up repair, a System Restore (the non-destructive type) from stored restore points on your hard drive, and reimage your system to your hard drive (or new one).

I do NOT recommend restoring the system to Factory settings unless you have a major problem and nothing else is helping. I also suspect that either you are misreading the intention of this warning, or it is not actually from HP's software. You can post a screen shot of it or contact HP customer support for clarity on it, and there is no harm in running Malwarebytes to test that theory as well.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#6
May 4, 2014 at 10:06:55
The message MIGHT be telling you to make the recovery disks, if you never did those.

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#7
May 4, 2014 at 11:18:35

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#8
May 4, 2014 at 12:05:15
The website you gave in your original posts is a legitimate one (HP), which spells out how to create a recovery facility. Next time you get that popup jot down the "exact" message. I too suspect it will prove to be as per #6.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#9
May 4, 2014 at 14:56:57
A couple of very valid suggestions in #5 and 6... Typically when one gets a new computer (laptops especially) there is a reminder/prompt to make a recovery set as soon as possible. Some of them may even include a back software proper utility - to create a true system image (#5) rather than a routine to create a bog standard/straight forward Factory Restore set of disks (#6).

Wouldn't hurt to have/create both options...?


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#10
May 4, 2014 at 15:16:06
Hi Derek, nice hearing from you! Yes, I am aware this is what the pop-up is wanting/asking/suggesting me to do...........make a lot of backup/recovery disks in case there is a need.

I got on Tom's Guide site, because I wasn't sure if I should do this or not, due to my researching others who followed the process and ran into problems and also knew there are many, on this site, who are more knowledgeable than myself pertaining to computer operations. I greatly appreciate the many responses received.

I suppose it's a matter of choice, on my part, as to do this or not. I've never had this pop-up since having a computer for many years, so this is the reason I hesitate because some times one can be sorry deciding to follow through a process, due to various negative outcomes.

I know it will pop up again, and when it does, I will provide exact words as they appear, even though there weren't many, other than what I mentioned in the beginning. Thanks

message edited by Dandelions41


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#11
May 4, 2014 at 15:55:56
The process is to create a set of disks that can restore your computer to the factory state. Without those disks you will be out of luck if your hard drive craps out.

Always a good idea to create the restore set if for no other reason you can use them to restore the computer to the factory state before selling of giving it away.

An old laptop without an operating system is pretty much useless.

If you have a hard drive failure you would use your backup/ images to restore the replacement drive back to the state of the latest image.


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#12
May 4, 2014 at 16:00:58
If it is telling you to make a set of recovery disks, get a couple of blank DVDr's and make it. For little money, you can have piece of mind. Yes, the recovery partition can reload Widows as it was from the factory, but if the drive dies, you loose this option and then have to purchase the set from HP and wait for it. If you make the Disk Image, you can get away without it, but it is nice to have anyway.
In conclusion, if it is a set of recovery disks, make them. In the mean time, make sure that you make a back up of your personal files, a repair disk, and a drive image is really nice to have as well.
Your choice, of course.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#13
May 5, 2014 at 19:32:03
To those who kindly responded to my question. I realize there is a need to have the 'Select as Best Answer' chosen. With all the great suggestions and comments, I find it difficult choosing just one particular answer. If it were that simple I would as I have done before, but I find they were all best answers so I feel I cannot chose just one. Thanks to all who responded. : )

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#14
May 5, 2014 at 20:47:13
As a general rule you can choose any posting by that fellow, DAVEINCAPS. . .

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#15
May 6, 2014 at 13:13:13
Nah, c'mon DAVE, you are just being modest.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#16
May 6, 2014 at 13:36:59
Dandelions41

You haven't told us what the solution was. What was/is the exact message?


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#17
May 6, 2014 at 18:56:50
There wasn't a specific solution from anyone in particular as there were many good suggestions offered from just about everyone and some were out of my limited computer technical knowledge for my desk top computer.

Therefore, I could not choose any single person but decided to choose DAVEINCAPS, even though his provided site for me to click on, was too complicated to follow. But I will take his advice by turning off the 'reminder' so I won't have to deal with that pop-up situation and take a chance I won't need to have a 'backup' even though I might later regret it.

Yes, I realized his suggestion of choosing him as in #14 was a bit short of being an ego thing and I didn't mind at all, but I kind of wanted to have this topic come to an end, as will that darn pop-up when I click the area that reads: 'do not remind me', as was suggested.....instead of 'remind me later' as I've been doing. Thanks :)


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#18
May 6, 2014 at 19:21:32
Lol. Hey I gotta catch up with Derek somehow.

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