Solved PC its not turn on after deleting partition

July 21, 2014 at 11:16:58
Specs: Windows 7, 8
Hello everyone. I'm new to the forum. I arrived here after searching for informatics largest forum on google.
I hope you can help me

When connecting my pc, I can choose if I will use Windows XP or 7 on the boot screen.
As I no longer use XP decided to delete. I tried to format the partition inside Windows 7 and it did not work.
I used the xp installation cd and managed to delete the partition.
But now, this message when connecting the pc, this message appears:

"reboot and select proper boot device or insert boot media in selected boot device and press a key"
post-1-1224623227.jpg

I thought that if I delete the XP partition, the PC would automatically boot into Windows 7. :wacko:
What do I do? Has some way to re-boot Windows 7 on my machine? I had hundreds of important files there.

See More: PC its not turn on after deleting partition

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✔ Best Answer
July 22, 2014 at 11:04:35
Before we forget... When you boot up with the Ubuntu dvd the first option is "start and install" (or something similar); and you merely let it start and boot (from the dvd) through to the desktop.

At no time use the "Install icon"... for obvious reasons... Regardless of where you may find it...

When Ubuntu has booted to the desktop - along the top of the screen is the Menu bar.

"Places" - has a drop down that includes "computer" - which is the actual hard drive installed in your computer, and there as a resource for the Ubuntu OS booted up/installed into RAM only. You can view the installed HD from there - in the list as "disk".

In that same (Places) list is the cd/dvd creator (burner...) When you insert a blank disk a window will pop up asking what do you want to do - create a dvd (of course); and when opt to create a dvd the creator window will open up.

You locate the files to be copied by clicking on the "disk" icon in the Places list left on the cd/dvd creator window. Browse your way to the file(s) you want to burn to cd/dvd; drag and drop them onto the icon in that places list... When you check the actual cd/dvd creator window you will find them shown there.

When all files are in the creator window, go to File (top menu) and select "write to disk". Options will be presented - suggest burn at slowest speed to be sure it all goes OK; faster burns can sometimes produce toasters (on cdr/dvdr) or corrupt recordings on cd-rw/dvd-rw

You will need an external cd/dvd burner (as best I can determine when booting into Ubuntu etc. from a dvd - and not running it as an installed OS...).

This link may also be useful to have a browse of...

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/C...

I'm not clear how you suddenly don't have win-7 files still present; if all you deleted (by reformatting) was the XP content - and boot/startup files which allowed both OS to work.

Was win-7 in its own partition space and XP likewise? If so then win-7 ought still to be there, but needs to have its startup files restored...

Incidentally I don't have too much experience with Ubuntu and Linux in genera. However I have gone through the above steps on my elderly Acer (XP-Pro) and it all works as I described when locating and burning files to a cd/dvd. So I think you will find it OK for you too. If the data files ("your personal stuff") is (still) on the hard drive then it can be located, and burned to external media as above.



#1
July 21, 2014 at 12:20:07
Hi and welcome to CN..

Let's go back a little in time...

Was XP the original operating system installed first; and then win-7 added in later?

And was XP in the first partition on the drive; and was win-7 installed into its own partition - typically another primary although not essential...?

Presuming XP was there first and win-7 added in later to create a dual-boot environment.. If so then when you deleted XP and reformatted its partition - regardless of how... - then very likely you also removed/deleted/lost the boot-manager (start-up files, boot-menu etc.) which controlled both OS boot sequence.

You have a lot of valuable "stuff you want to safely access and preserve..

I suggest you make that your "first goal' - and then worry about recovering a normal boot to win-7; and that latter isn't hard to do...

Download a Ubuntu ISO; burn it to a DVD; boot up with that DVD. It's a freebie Linux derivative and will load itself into RAM only. The hard drive will then be a mere resource for the Linux OS (installed in RAM only). With Ubuntu booted up you ought to be able to view the entire drive and access - and thus copy - all your files to external storage. Typically this is to DVD but if possible also to another external HD. Verify the copies are accessible to on another working system (just to be sure).

http://www.ubuntu.com

The ISO is free to download, to burn and use. Simply boot your system from the DVD you make... and proceed as above...

Then when you have done that you can run a win-7 repair routine of sorts...

This is one of various approaches; and each of the methods posted out there in www-land invariably depends on the situation in hand...

http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorial...

Note their comments using a win-7 disk that is the same style of OS that you have. i.e. if your win-7 is OEM (and many are) then you must use an OEM style disk - and your key will have OEM in it if it is; and you can use your key if needs-be. If your win-7 installation was from a retail disk then it will not have OEM in the key; and thus you use a retail style disk (and key accordingly); and I suspect you have a retail disk..?...

This link:

http://tinyurl.com/k8ek2ph

will give you a host of other possible paths to that end... Suggest you read a few to get feel of what/how etc.and then have a go. Once you have safeguarded all your personal files etc. (off the system as is) the risk of data loss is significantly reduced?

In essence what you have to restore - to the active Primary partition - are the win-7 boot/start-up files.

Incidentally your message header is a little misleading... Your PC turns on - it just won't boot to the remaining OS - to win-7. Also always useful to include make and model of your computer when posting a CFH (Call For Help) in any forum; doesn't always have a direct bearing on the problem/solution - but on occasion (and frequently) it does...

message edited by trvlr


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#2
July 21, 2014 at 14:41:05
The message you're getting kinda sounds like the bios isn't finding the hard drive at all. However deleting a partition on the drive wouldn't have caused that.

Go into cmos/bios setup and verify the hard drive is seen OK and that it's either first in the boot order or second behind the cd/dvd drive.


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#3
July 21, 2014 at 14:50:45
"The message you're getting kinda sounds like the bios isn't finding the hard drive at all. However deleting a partition on the drive wouldn't have caused that."

No the BIOS is finding the hard drive OK and knows it is the boot drive. The problem is that the boot files were on the XP partition which has now been deleted - hence Windows can't boot because there is no bootable partition on that disk any more. With multiple Windows installations you have to be very careful about deleting bootable partitions.

I agree 100% with the previous poster that the most important thing is to recover any important data in the manner he suggested before making any other changes to the disk. (That's assuming that there is not already a full backup of important data which, of course, there should be.) After that is done the OP can try to make the partition bootable by using the Windows rescue tools - basically doing a repair install. I have my doubts that this will work; the only solution may be a fresh install - never a bad idea.


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#4
July 21, 2014 at 14:57:43
If there is no bootable device present - and there wouldn't be if my presumptions are correct re' XP in first and then win-7, and then the primary was erased of all files...
(including of course the boot/start-up files) - then there would be a load bootable media type of message...?

If win-7 went in after XP it would have replaced the XP boot-files etc. with the win-7 version in the process of installation and setting up the dual-boot; so wiping the content in the XP primary would mean no boot-files at all left; so no bootable media present...?


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#5
July 22, 2014 at 02:13:20
Hello and thanks for replying! I tried to repair the operating system, and guess what?
Windows 7 was not even listed as an operating system. Then I started to sweat.
I recorded a CD with Puppy Linux and I was relieved. My files are still there. I just could not copy to an external hd because of a stupid error message.
Then I read your response and burned a cd of ubuntu. And confirmed what was already obvious to me. The OS has detected that there was no operating system installed on my pc. I have no experience with ubuntu. And I have no idea where are my files, and I do not know how to copy them to the external hd.

Hope you can help me. At least now I am relieved. I thought I had lost my files forever.


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#6
July 22, 2014 at 04:51:16
Pending myself or others here detailing how to use Ubuntu and access/copy your files... (I'm on the road just now).. do NOT try to install anything to the hard drive; nor write to it it in any way.

More anon from many of use here (myself included).


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#7
July 22, 2014 at 11:04:35
✔ Best Answer
Before we forget... When you boot up with the Ubuntu dvd the first option is "start and install" (or something similar); and you merely let it start and boot (from the dvd) through to the desktop.

At no time use the "Install icon"... for obvious reasons... Regardless of where you may find it...

When Ubuntu has booted to the desktop - along the top of the screen is the Menu bar.

"Places" - has a drop down that includes "computer" - which is the actual hard drive installed in your computer, and there as a resource for the Ubuntu OS booted up/installed into RAM only. You can view the installed HD from there - in the list as "disk".

In that same (Places) list is the cd/dvd creator (burner...) When you insert a blank disk a window will pop up asking what do you want to do - create a dvd (of course); and when opt to create a dvd the creator window will open up.

You locate the files to be copied by clicking on the "disk" icon in the Places list left on the cd/dvd creator window. Browse your way to the file(s) you want to burn to cd/dvd; drag and drop them onto the icon in that places list... When you check the actual cd/dvd creator window you will find them shown there.

When all files are in the creator window, go to File (top menu) and select "write to disk". Options will be presented - suggest burn at slowest speed to be sure it all goes OK; faster burns can sometimes produce toasters (on cdr/dvdr) or corrupt recordings on cd-rw/dvd-rw

You will need an external cd/dvd burner (as best I can determine when booting into Ubuntu etc. from a dvd - and not running it as an installed OS...).

This link may also be useful to have a browse of...

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/C...

I'm not clear how you suddenly don't have win-7 files still present; if all you deleted (by reformatting) was the XP content - and boot/startup files which allowed both OS to work.

Was win-7 in its own partition space and XP likewise? If so then win-7 ought still to be there, but needs to have its startup files restored...

Incidentally I don't have too much experience with Ubuntu and Linux in genera. However I have gone through the above steps on my elderly Acer (XP-Pro) and it all works as I described when locating and burning files to a cd/dvd. So I think you will find it OK for you too. If the data files ("your personal stuff") is (still) on the hard drive then it can be located, and burned to external media as above.


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#8
July 22, 2014 at 19:39:47
Another option to copy your files if you are still confused:
Turn off the computer and remove the hard drive. Either connect it as a second hard drive on another desktop computer, put it into an external drive case, or connect it with a hard drive dock or other adapter. Once it is connected, if the file system is in tact, you will be able to copy the files to that computer, a flash drive, an external hard drive, or burn a DVD/CD.

Any Windows 7 install disk or Windows 7 Repair Disk can perform a Start Up Repair, the only condition is that both the system and the disk are both either 32bit or 64bit. The start up repair will replace the boot files and some other system files as needed. A Repair install is a little bit more involved and needs a compatible install DVD but can repair the system if there is more damage. As long as you have saved all of your files, do not be afraid of completely wiping the entire drive and reinstalling from scratch as long as you have your install DVD and your product key. This has the advantage of a completely clean start over but the disadvantage that you will need to reinstall all of your programs as well.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#9
July 23, 2014 at 01:29:13
Good alternative from Fingers (what happened to "toes"?) re copying files.

As we don't know if your computer is a laptop or not... But just in-case it is - be sure to remove the battery as well as disconnecting from mains power so as to be sure it is fully powered down..

If it's a desktop/tower ensure you remove the mains cordfrom it; so as to be really sure it is fully powered down.

message edited by trvlr


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#10
July 25, 2014 at 00:08:22
Guys, thank you all for the suggestions. I'll tell you what happened at the end: I was using Ubuntu 10.12 I managed to make a copy of all my files to the external HD. Advantage and tried using Ubuntu for 2 days but gave up. I even used an app that allowed me to install windows software but did not satisfy me. I loved the look but thought annoying to have to open the terminal to do anything. I started using computers in 2006 and he got used to this system of doing things through command prompts. But I found the proposal interesting. I hope they improve the project through the years.
I'm already using Windows 7 Home Premium. Thank you all for the help.

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