need to clean up a SSD

October 1, 2013 at 01:12:36
Specs: Windows 7 pro, AMD 8 core / 32 gigs
I have a Intel 120 gig SSD and I just can't rectify the amount of data on it, I have windows7 pro for the OS which is approx 32 gig I have Revits design suit which is 30 gigs I have a E/F 1 tera bit each for data storage and backup. I just can't seem to be able to determine where all of the additional data is being generated from, As there is data storage on the C drive. So is there a program that can anilize and remove data that isn't needed such a MS exploder and or MS Office which is something that must be part of the OEM of windows 7

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#1
October 1, 2013 at 02:17:53
Lets start with this. I use it on every comp I work on.

Run Wise Disk Cleaner ( Run the 1st three tabs, left to right. I use default settings, leave boxes that are unchecked, unchecked ) Reboot when finished.
http://www.softpedia.com/get/System...
http://www.softpedia.com/progScreen...
http://www.wisecleaner.com/download...


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#2
October 1, 2013 at 09:35:33
I use AVG system maintenance and the drive is defraged and cleaned, plus I ran MS system check for malware and viruses, clean there too. What I am looking for is a program to help me determine if there are any extra baggage I don't need on the C drive.I had at one point purchase a file duplication app but it couldn't tell me anything about the files them selves, it just registered the duplications. But there shouldn't be any duplication on this system with the C drive I just built this system for design work a little over a year and a half ago.

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#3
October 1, 2013 at 09:58:52
"Disk maintenance" is designed for traditional drives. At best, your program will refuse to defrag it. At worst, your program will defrag it, leading to temporary decreased performance and a shortened SSD lifespan. Depending on the nature of the "cleaning", you could possibly enjoy similar decreased performance / lifespan.

As for disk visualization software, look at WinDirStat.

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Related Solutions

#4
October 1, 2013 at 11:29:07
Be a bit careful with file duplication apps. Often there is a very good reason why a fie is duplicated and if you start deleting duplicates you can cause issues. The sum total of extra space used by duplicates is usually minimal.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#5
October 1, 2013 at 11:44:59
Exactly that is why i am surprised that there isn't a secondary program that tells you which files are non essentials and which are. So the extra baggage can be eliminated with out screwing up the performance of the drive. When I used a duplicate file program it told me all of the duplicate files and so when I contacted tech support as too which files might removed they had no clue as to how to proceed.

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#6
October 1, 2013 at 11:55:27
"they had no clue as to how to proceed"
Like Derek said, too dangerous, they are right.

The Wise program I gave you, takes the danger out.


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#7
October 1, 2013 at 12:15:08
Ok so I down loaded all three from wise and installed them now what I see no operational feed back at all.

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#8
October 1, 2013 at 12:32:51
"Ok so I down loaded all three from wise"
Here is what I asked you to install, name the 3 you installed please.

Wise Disk Cleaner ( Run the 1st three tabs, left to right. I use default settings, leave boxes that are unchecked, unchecked ) Reboot when finished.

http://i.imgur.com/Jecnfvb.gif
http://i.imgur.com/0xHwdom.gif
http://i.imgur.com/JZLYOLf.gif


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#9
October 1, 2013 at 12:43:51
It should be noted the duplicate files are probably the same file with two different names. Programs like Explorer count drive space used by getting a list of file names, asking around for the file that goes by that name, and checking to see how big it is. If a file has two names, it'll count the file twice, and it's not smart enough to realize it's double-counting.

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#10
October 1, 2013 at 12:47:26
"At worst, your program will defrag it, leading to temporary decreased performance and a shortened SSD lifespan"
Razor2.3 is right, you do not defrag a SSD drive.

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#11
October 1, 2013 at 12:52:07

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#12
October 1, 2013 at 13:53:02
great when I downloaded the files I got -cking sweetpacks and I have been trying to get uninstall unsuccessfully so far, I have tried the paste into the ULR about:config and went in and modified the access, with no results so far, I thought these download site you sent me to would not be doing this kind of trickery.

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#13
October 1, 2013 at 15:22:35
What file did you download?

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#14
October 1, 2013 at 15:37:20
the three you suggested and a remove old programs scrubber, which was listed on the same page. I finely went into Mozilla Firefox and used the restore program, but I removed all of the downloads to make sure it was completely gone and not able to reinfect me again..

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#15
October 1, 2013 at 19:40:45
Please note that you may be running low on space on your SSD due to something you have not considered. Windows by default puts in a Paging file (virtual memory) and a System Restore with reserved space, both can take up a lot of room. On an SSD drive, you should turn off the paging file and instead, turn it on one of your other hard drives. I am not sure what most do with System Restore on SSD drives, but you can reduce the amount of space it can use (say 8% of the drive instead of 15%), or turn it off and keep an image of the drive on one or more of your hard drives (and periodically update it) as well as a regular back up for your settings and files. Others who have more experience with SSD drives will be able to advise you better on this though.
Another way to optimize things is to keep an image of the drive exactly as you like it, and if it slows up or fills up, save anything you might need to and reimage the drive back to that state. This cannot be anywhere as bad as using a lot of utilities, many of which are made for conventional drives, regularly in an attempt to optimize things. Again, those who use SSD's will voice their opinion on this as well.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#16
October 2, 2013 at 13:36:45
I'm not sure what 3 programs I recommend; I only linked to WinDirStat, a program that shows how much space each folder takes. I know there was a virus that called itself WinDirStat, but I linked the official page for that program.

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