Solved My PC clock constantly losing time even with 2 new batteries

September 22, 2015 at 05:10:38
Specs: Windows 7
I am running windows 7 and over the last week my computer time is all out of wack, I have replaced the cmos battery twice (just in case the first one I bought was a dud), I have no viruses.... when I enter the bios the cpu clock looks like it is frozen and does not work......I can be using my computer during the day then it will loose an hour all of a sudden ....any ideas?? thanks

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✔ Best Answer
September 24, 2015 at 20:21:52
Did you try clearing the cmos yet? I don't know why but sometimes that fixes oddball motherboard issues. With the power cord removed locate the 'clear cmos' jumper pins. It's usually 3 pins with a jumper currently over 2 of them--the standby position. Jumper it to the 'clear' position for a few secnds and then back to standby. Then plug the power cord back in and start it up. You'll probably get a message about bios options not set so go into cmos/bios setup and set the time and date and maybe configure the sata or IDE controller.

Some Asus boards only had 2 pins for clearing the cmos so you may need to consult the motherboard manual for that or for info on reconfiguring it after it's been cleared but it's usually not complicated.

Also disconnect any external drives and pull any add-on cards just in case they're a factor. Then try it again.



#1
September 22, 2015 at 06:38:54
The CMOS batteries you bought may have already been under the required 3 volts owing the length of time they've been in storage since they were manufactured. This is not an unusual problem, in fact I had to buy one from a different supplier when the first one I bought measured only 2.5 volts on a voltmeter and it wasn't enough to fix the problem of clock losing time.

I made sure not to buy the second one from the same place.

I cannot think of any other reason why your PC clock is losing time other than an under-voltage CMOS battery. Make sure you buy a lithium one as they have a much longer shelf & service life.

message edited by phil22


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#2
September 22, 2015 at 10:13:31
When you lose an hour is it exactly an hour? I'm wondering if it's automatically udating via internet time and you've got the wrong time zone set. Here's some info on setting the clock and synchronizing with internet time:

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/...

Daylight savings time changes are a possibility too. I've disabled its automatic adjustment of DST on mine because for some reason the time updates wouldn't get it right.

I've also heard instances where running particular software seems to interfere with the clock. I don't think there was ever a fix posted for that. You might try running the computer in safe mode for awhile and see if you experience the same problem.


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#3
September 22, 2015 at 14:32:27
Hi, Thanks for your reply,

After I purchased the second battery I checked the voltage with a multimeter, both new batteries are putting out around 3.4v so I know the battery isn't the issue, I have also made sure the contact is ok in the battery socket as well.
With the time it is not necessarily an hour nor does it really have any structure to its loss, in fact I turned on the computer this morning and the clock was showing 9.45pm on the previous day. Ill try running the computer in safe mode to see what happens.
thanks again


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Related Solutions

#4
September 22, 2015 at 21:35:37
When the computer is running, windows should keep the clock updated. When the computer is off it's the battery and/or the power suppy (even when off the PSU usually provides a small charge for, I think, 'start on' events in bios setup) that manage the time. Your description seem to indicate that neither is keeping time.

Possibly keeping track of when and how much time is lost will give you an idea of what's going on when it happens.


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#5
September 23, 2015 at 01:27:04
Hi Dave,

As it stands there seems to be no regular or systematic way that the clock changes.
This morning I reset the clock at 11.45am it is not 17.55pm but my computer shows 12.18pm. The computer has not been turned of nor has it had any programs running.
I know I am clutching at straws but the only thing I think it could be would be the motherboard.....but like I have said that is clutching at straws. I built the PC and have never had any issues prior to this one.

cheers
Andrew


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#6
September 23, 2015 at 12:06:46
Yeah, that's an odd one alright.

I was working on a computer once and removed the motherboard and accidently set it down on a pad of steel wool. After that the motherboard never held the time even with a new battery. Obviously I had shorted out part of the cmos circuitry so it's possible to damage that part of the motherboard and still have a computer that works.

I've never heard of malware messing with the clock but I suppose it wouldn't hurt to run something like malwarebytes:

https://www.malwarebytes.org/downlo...

(the free, non-trial version--should be the first download on that page) and see if it finds anything.


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#7
September 24, 2015 at 15:57:24
Hi Dave,
I have already tried Malwarebytes and Spybot search and Destroy and neither found any issues, I have tried to have ASUS provide technical Support but unfortunately when I speak to a technician they don't offer phone support with motherboards. My computer is well spec'd but maybe its time to rebuild :-(

cheers


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#8
September 24, 2015 at 20:21:52
✔ Best Answer
Did you try clearing the cmos yet? I don't know why but sometimes that fixes oddball motherboard issues. With the power cord removed locate the 'clear cmos' jumper pins. It's usually 3 pins with a jumper currently over 2 of them--the standby position. Jumper it to the 'clear' position for a few secnds and then back to standby. Then plug the power cord back in and start it up. You'll probably get a message about bios options not set so go into cmos/bios setup and set the time and date and maybe configure the sata or IDE controller.

Some Asus boards only had 2 pins for clearing the cmos so you may need to consult the motherboard manual for that or for info on reconfiguring it after it's been cleared but it's usually not complicated.

Also disconnect any external drives and pull any add-on cards just in case they're a factor. Then try it again.


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#9
September 24, 2015 at 21:56:36
Hi Dave,

Thanks for the last tip!!! So far so good

I hadn't cleared the cmos as the bios was still booting, however after clearing the cmos and resetting the time on the bios I noticed that the seconds on the time was clicking over where as before it wasn't. So I will report back soon but at this all is well, I will know within the hour wether this has fully worked.

Thanks Again!! you may have just saved me a lot of time and money!!

cheers
Andrew


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#10
September 25, 2015 at 00:10:40
WOHOO!! Thanks again Dave!!
Well over an hour later and the time is still ok, Thank you so much for pointing me in that direction, it looks like it has definitely worked.

Kind regards
Andrew


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#11
September 25, 2015 at 01:35:16
Wow, that was kind of a last ditch you-ain't-got-nothing-to-lose-by-trying-it solution. I hope it continues to work OK.

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#12
September 25, 2015 at 17:01:42
I know right??? well day 2 and still perfect time..... must say I love your last ditch you-ain't-got-nothing-to-lose-by-trying-it solution.

Cheers


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