Solved mp3 split file split

April 7, 2014 at 05:13:45
Specs: w7, x86-64
Sounds simple, but I need just a tool to split MP3's (very large files). And, I would need it for long term usage, so trial versions are not what I'm looking for. I don't mind paying for a decent tool, but for such a simple feature, it sounds a bit overdone ... there must be something out there.

Command line would be great, but GIU is good enough

I was also wondering if a basic file cutting method (on OS level) would work on MP3's
Especially the part AFTER the cut

Hi there.


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✔ Best Answer
June 12, 2014 at 05:39:18
Found these:
ffmpeg.exe
mp3splt.exe

The first one allows for a split of any file, even if the amount of time exceeds 1 hour (which mp3splt.exe does not seem to be able to), but mp3splt.exe can be used to divide MP3's into parts of maximum 1 hour (actually, 59 minutes, 59 seconds and 59 hundreds of seconds). The ffmpeg.exe can do lots more actually, including many features with MP4.

Perfect ! I can now do the combined cutting and splitting actions in a matter of seconds, instead of opening GUI and using complex actions and drag and drop and other issues (like opening 2 Gig MP3's, do that in an average MP3 GUI edit tool).

The exe's are actually Windows ported projects from Linux ..

Hi there.



#1
April 7, 2014 at 08:27:12
Take a look at Audacity:

http://audacity.sourceforge.net/

While it's description is pretty basic...

"Audacity® is free, open source, cross-platform software for recording and editing sounds."

...the program is very powerful. You should have no problem splitting your audio files at the exact location you want the split to occur.

I have used Audacity to create MP3 files from a lot of my vinyl albums. Since you can copy/paste within the file, I have eliminated skips and distortions to clean up the files.

I don't remember how it works when importing/exporting MP3's to MP3's, but I do know that when recording from vinyl and exporting the files as MP3's you also need to download the free LAME encoder as explained here:

http://audacity.sourceforge.net/hel...

I only mention that so that you are not surprised if Audacity pops up a message about requiring the LAME encoder when you try to export the MP3's.

Let us know what you think.

message edited by DerbyDad03


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#2
April 8, 2014 at 04:56:43

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#3
April 8, 2014 at 12:21:18
I'll give it another try,but Audacity looks very complex to me, and the particular function was pretty hard to perform. But, I'll give it another go since it's very known ...

Hi there.


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Related Solutions

#4
April 8, 2014 at 12:22:13
That's the kind of response I don't like, it's basically saying : go to Google & type.
If you have nothing more to add, don't bother replying.

Hi there.


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#5
April 8, 2014 at 12:47:10
One problem with Audacity is that it installs with my local language, which is a b__ch since all functions have very akward names. And I can't find the split function again ... this program is suffering from overfunctionality, and simple actions cannot be done. That's the idea I get.

I used a regular file splitter (not mp3-focuesses),and it actually works; I can open all files and listen to them. Problem is that the split is based on megabytes, because he doesn't know it's an MP3 file ..

Hi there.


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#6
April 8, 2014 at 12:48:11
There are two ways you can do this.

You can use a wave editing program like Audacity or Adobe Audition. They work very well and are not hard at all to master for simple editing like splitting audio. The downside to using a wave editing program is the mp3 file has to be decoded to a raw PCM file first, then edited, then re-encoded as an mp3. This decoding and re-encoding process will degrade the sound of the MP3 file. If your doing this for music and plan to play the files on a decent audio system, you most likely will hear the degradation. If you are just playing them on an MP3 player with average earbuds or if the audio is talking you will be fine using this method.

The second method is using software that is specifically designed for splitting MP3 files without having to decode and re-encode. This will give you a lossless edit. There are many out there and it would be hard to list them all. Googling as actually a good method for finding them. Some are more intuitive than others and it might be worth while to download a few and try them out before purchasing the full version to see which one suites your needs the best. Here is a freebie one, it's not bad, I use to used this one. http://www.nch.com.au/splitter/

message edited by THX 1138


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#7
April 8, 2014 at 15:00:40
Google is your friend. Click on the link below.

https://www.google.com/search?q=MP3...


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#8
April 8, 2014 at 23:18:41
If your purpose in doing this is because they're too large to copy to a temporary media or you want to keep them from being used by others then any file splitter program should work. If you want to split them up for editing purposes then you'd need to use something like what has already been suggested.

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#9
April 9, 2014 at 20:37:15
That's the kind of response I don't like, it's basically saying : go to Google & type.
If you have nothing more to add, don't bother replying.

That's a bit unfair... the helper is giving you a link which gives you the option of sorting out what you would like, there is nothing to type.

You would do well to remember that advice given here is free from voluntary helpers who are unable to analyze requests in order to determine a posters likes and dislikes.

Audacity is your best bet and if you are prepared to spend a bit of time on it you will get excellent results. There are numerous help pages available but unfortunately you will have to do a bit of typing!


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#10
May 13, 2014 at 06:13:29
Splitting works, but I found only splitters based on bytes, and the files are sound files, so I need to split on length of the media inside the file, which isn't the same.

Although splitting itself seems to work, the result maybe different from the extension used (not all are MP3)

Hi there.

message edited by User123456789


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#11
May 13, 2014 at 19:50:40
It doesn't seem like the type of file would make a difference but if that's the case maybe you need to look for splitters specifically made for media files. Since an mp3 file is essentially a compressed wav file maybe it's the compression that's causing the problem.

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#12
June 12, 2014 at 05:39:18
✔ Best Answer
Found these:
ffmpeg.exe
mp3splt.exe

The first one allows for a split of any file, even if the amount of time exceeds 1 hour (which mp3splt.exe does not seem to be able to), but mp3splt.exe can be used to divide MP3's into parts of maximum 1 hour (actually, 59 minutes, 59 seconds and 59 hundreds of seconds). The ffmpeg.exe can do lots more actually, including many features with MP4.

Perfect ! I can now do the combined cutting and splitting actions in a matter of seconds, instead of opening GUI and using complex actions and drag and drop and other issues (like opening 2 Gig MP3's, do that in an average MP3 GUI edit tool).

The exe's are actually Windows ported projects from Linux ..

Hi there.


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#13
June 12, 2014 at 20:54:05
Thanks for posting back. I marked it as 'best answer' since you found the solution.

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