Solved Move Location of Windows 7 System Restore files directory

June 20, 2013 at 23:28:39
Specs: Win 7
Where are the backup files for System Restore saved?

Can that location be changed to a logical drive other than
the one that the system files are on? I have a logical drive
set aside for temporary files, but I don't see how to have
the System Restore files saved to it.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#1
June 21, 2013 at 03:07:07
✔ Best Answer
System Restore saves the information for each partition in a hidden folder called System Volume Information on that partition. As far as I know there is no way of altering this location, but you can control how much space it uses

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#2
June 21, 2013 at 04:13:01
Here is a discusion that contains a lot of opinions. Post #7 may have the handle on it, but it will be debated probably for years.
http://www.overclock.net/t/967349/s...

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#3
June 21, 2013 at 04:42:46
The backup files for System Restore are saved in the "System Volume Information" folder on each volume. System files will be in the volume that contains Windows. This cannot be changed. It also contains the previous versions of files if this is configured and a number of other things as well. You can set the disk space used for these functions but the folder will remain.

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#4
June 21, 2013 at 10:00:43
Unless you are really stuck for space I would think they are best left where they are rather than rocking the boat.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#5
June 21, 2013 at 11:56:04
Oh, *that's* what "System Volume Information" is! I had the
impression it was some kind of higher-level disk directory
type thingy, except that it never seemed to be used for
anything on any drives other than the one with the OS.

Do I understand correctly that System Restore only operates
manually? That is, if it ever does a restore, it will be because
I explicitly clicked on it and told it to do so? In three years of
using Windows 7, I've never used it. That might be because
there were never any appropriate restore points. I can only
guess that that was because it wasn't given enough disk space,
though I never intentionally changed it from the default. I might
have reduced it inadvertantly. How much space should I give it?

Also, under what conditions does the "restore previous version"
feature come into play? Does it apply to my data files? Say I
edit a text file and save it. Is the older version saved by System
Protection / System Restore so that I could recover it with the
Restore previous version function? If so, that's a mighty big
security hole. Yet another place that Windows makes copies
of private data that isn't deleted when the user deletes the file.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#6
June 21, 2013 at 13:23:00
Restore won't touch your own files unless they have been put in system places.

As far as I know the restoring is not automatic (or if so it doesn't declare it).
I could be wrong so see what others think or know.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#7
June 21, 2013 at 13:47:49
System Restore makes a restore point once a week and whenever anything is installed, uninstalled, and before a Windows or MS Update.
System Restore defaults to using 15% of the hard drive partition that Windows is installed on. On a larger drive, you can lower this to 10% or 12%, but I would not recommend generally less than 8% unless disk space is problem.
If you need to access older restore points, you need to click on "Show more restore points" on the restore screen.
System restore only saves and restores system files, personal files are your responsibility to set up a back up for.
Storing a System Image is also a very good idea in case of a major infection or a dead drive (from within the Windows back up section). Also you should (if you have not already) make a Windows 7 Repair Disk whick can access your restore points from outside of Windows, Initiate a Start Up Repair, and reimage your hard drive from your saved image.
As far as I know, it can only be on the System Drive. If you need space, you can minimize the paging file on your system drive (1000MB) and add an additional paging file on another drive.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#8
June 21, 2013 at 16:41:10
Fingers wrote:

> If you need to access older restore points, you need to
> click on "Show more restore points" on the restore screen.

Oh, for heaven's sake! All this time and I never found that!
So the system backups are being saved after all!

My desire to move the files isn't due to limited space, but to
minimize the file fragmentation caused by writing and deleting
temporary files like these. I have Temporary Internet Files and
other temporary files on their own partition just for that reason.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#9
June 21, 2013 at 17:03:42
In the Windows 9x days I used defrag manually about once a week. I "felt" there was a small improvement and (if this was not imagined) then it was probably down to the speed of hardware at that time.

Since then I have only defragged about once a month. Although I accept there must be "some" difference afterwards, I can't really say it has been enough to notice at all.

Maybe others have a different experience.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#10
June 21, 2013 at 19:37:37
Derek: Windows 7 automatically does defrag automatically. i do not know if it is continuous (I doubt it), but it probably uses down time and does it often enough so that it never really becomes fragmented like XP and 95/98 did in the past.

Jeff: Glad I could shed some light on the subject for you.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#11
June 22, 2013 at 08:07:26
Fingers

Yes, I realise that - same on Windows 8 which I'm using. It's just me, apart from my AV updates I disable almost all other automation (including defrag, Windows updates, flash and java). Just like to have full control of what is going on and not find myself in the situation where I have to wait my turn to use my own computer.

I accept that auto defrag doesn't really interrupt but still prefer to run it after Windows monthly updates then pop back when it has finished. I wouldn't suggest this approach to others but it has given me a good handle on how much difference defrag actually makes.

My wife is quite different with her computer - she prefers all the automation she can get. Whenever I try to use her computer I find I have to wait because some darned update or other is hogging it.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#12
June 24, 2013 at 17:59:34
Fingers. Re #10 and my #11

I think I should add, that right now I have only used 173 GB out of 913 GB total. If the HD space fills significantly I might have to give up my manual defrag ways. It would then make sense to let it defrag bit by bit in the background (more frequently), as you implied, otherwise it could take me ages to defrag it all once a month.

Thanks for giving me food for thought.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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