Solved Move hard drive partitions without losing data

Acer New acer aspire one 521 533 d255 d2...
July 17, 2012 at 06:38:32
Specs: Windows 7, 1.4 GHz / 1 GB
OK, so I have 1 hard drive with 3 partitions in my PC with Windows 7 and my hard drive 250 GB large. This is how it's laid out: System Reserved [200MB] - C: Windows 7 [222GB] - Unallocated [20GB] - Data [10GB]

This was in order. But I want to fill up the unallocated space to make it: System Reserved [200MB] - C: Windows 7 [222GB] - Data [30GB]

How can I do this without losing data?


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✔ Best Answer
July 17, 2012 at 19:25:28
I know Gparted would do it. I have done that. The new gparted live was just released the other day and I'd use it if Windows can't.

It may be that the Gparted operation would be to use two steps also. A move across unpartitioned space and then the expand. You tell it to do both at the same time and then apply the operation.

Windows on windows files is my first choice even if linux says they can do it.

Google is evil



#1
July 17, 2012 at 07:59:27
Just use any partition management software. I use the free edition of Paragon Hard Disk Manager, but there are many others.

Actually you may just be able to do this in Windows 7 using Disk Management.


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#2
July 17, 2012 at 08:56:40
I would not "move" them. The order makes no difference. Just expand data.

Windows has a way to expand drives. If for some reason it can't then you may need to find out why. Some programs may be locking the data to some area. It may be that your reserved is a special recovery area too.

If all else fails and you insist then get the live gparted or almost any live linux cd with gparted to resize the partition.

Google is evil


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#3
July 17, 2012 at 08:58:24
I believe the reserved partition must stay at the front of the drive. It should not be assigned a drive letter.

You can partition and format the unallocated space from within Windows Disk Management. You can also reassign all drive letters but C:.

You do that by FIRST vacating the drive letter you want to reassign by moving it to an unused letter. You get the idea?


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Related Solutions

#4
July 17, 2012 at 11:27:51
I don't believe you can expand data into unallocated.

You can expand unallocated into data but you would lose the data in data.

Best way to not lose data is to back it up. No matter what that has to be your first step. Any partition manipulation risks data loss so backup.

Given that, the solution is easy. Using windows disk management delete data which makes it unallocated and then make one partition of all the unallocated space.

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
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#5
July 17, 2012 at 13:27:42
I just tried to extend a partition into unallocated space and it let me. It was not a drive that had any programs or other data locking it.

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#6
July 17, 2012 at 15:35:22
You can always extend into unallocated space if that space exist AFTER the partition you want to expand.

Try expanding an existing partition into unallocated space BEFORE the partition you want to expand. To make sure its correct put a file in the partition before you expand. The file should remain after the expansion.

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
How to properly post a question:
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#7
July 17, 2012 at 18:05:33
I don't think you can expand a partition backwards into unallocated space either, There is too much information at the beginning of the partition that has to remain at the beginning, Expanding the partition forwards into unallocated space is a simple matter,

The thing to do in this instance is to move the 10 Gb Partition to the beginning of the unallocated space then expand it. Most third party partition managers will allow you to Move a partitions but Windows wont.

There should be no loss of data but make sure you have a back of the partition you are moving. Moving a partition is quite a complex procedure and if anything should go wrong, such as a power failure, then the partition is likely to be toast.

Stuart


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#8
July 17, 2012 at 19:25:28
✔ Best Answer
I know Gparted would do it. I have done that. The new gparted live was just released the other day and I'd use it if Windows can't.

It may be that the Gparted operation would be to use two steps also. A move across unpartitioned space and then the expand. You tell it to do both at the same time and then apply the operation.

Windows on windows files is my first choice even if linux says they can do it.

Google is evil


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#9
July 17, 2012 at 19:36:46
according to your description and I got your disk partition configuration, however Windows 7 disk management only allows you extending the C partition with the unallocated space not extend the data partition. to add the unallocated space to the data partition, you can search some partition software such as GParted, AOMEI Partition Assistant Home Edition and so on. And I prefer AOMEI because it is much easier to use and ensure data security like pcworld recommended:
http://www.pcworld.com/downloads/fi...

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#10
July 18, 2012 at 04:28:35
#'s 4,7,8, as far as I know have it.
Absolutely back up the Data before starting. Then move the partition 'forward' to begin just after your C Drive and then expand it. As above, Windows Disk Manager could handle the expansion if the unallocated space is after the Data Partition, but I am pretty sure that it cannot do the Move. Gparted is spoke of well here though I have no personal experience with it.
As a possible alternative you might want to try this as a 3 step using Disk Manager (after backing up of course):
Create a new partition for the unallocated space with a new drive letter.
Copy all files from the Data Drive to the new drive.
Delete the Data Partition.
Expand the new partition to cover all 30GB
Rename the partition Data and reassign the original drive letter so that programs can find the files. Test it.
I guess that is more than 3 steps....

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#11
July 18, 2012 at 09:11:16
And you could use ntbackup or windows backup to save off to some location. Fix the partitions and recover the files with the backup program.

Google is evil


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#12
July 18, 2012 at 18:12:20
I think this article is also helpful, since if you partitioned the hard drive, as time goes on, the free space will be less and less, and then you may have to repartition this hard drive. However, there are some limitations with Windows build-in disk management. You may unable to not move the unallocated space to extend the non contiguous partition or could not create more partition. Once you have created 4 primary partitions on MBR disk, you could not create more partitions. The solution is to convert one of the partitions to logical. But Windows will not allow you convert it without data loss. In Windows 7/8, it allows you to create more partitions unless you convert this disk to dynamic disk. However convert to dynamic disk is not a good solution.

To solve these problem you could learn more from How to Partition a Hard Drive, it present several situations and the solutions.


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