Migrate from Windows 7 to Windows 10

Hewlett-packard / PAVILION
November 7, 2019 at 11:11:39
Specs: Windows 7, Intel Pentium D 925
I see Windows 7 supports ends on 01/01/2020. Is it it a good idea to upgrade if I'm perfectly satisfied with Windows 7?

Your thoughts? Uncle Dewey


See More: Migrate from Windows 7 to Windows 10

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#1
November 7, 2019 at 14:11:17
As long as your comp meets the W10 requirements, I would move to W10.
If your W7 install is running perfectly, just download the correct version of W10 onto your Desktop & run Setup. It is still FREE.

I have been using W10 almost from day 1.

message edited by Johnw


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#2
November 7, 2019 at 14:36:37
It will be OK for a while, but eventually the lack of security patches & updates will make Win7 un-secure/unsafe. And eventually, browser & software developers will also begin dropping Win7 support. What you should have done was download Win10 back when it was free & then simply not install it until you were ready. You might still be able to get it for free, see the following:
https://www.cnet.com/news/windows-1...

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#3
November 10, 2019 at 03:23:26
It's a good question ... to which I would advice this:
- Do you plan to use Windows for professional activities ?
- Do you plan to use any kind of banking or financially related software ?

If either answer is yes, migrate to Windows 10


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#4
November 10, 2019 at 03:32:37
> As long as your comp meets the W10 requirements,
> I would move to W10.

Microsoft has made the technical specs extremely low in order for ANY computer to be "able" to run Windows 10, but in reality you would need quite some resources. I'm not deciding those specs, but I wouldn't run Windows 10 on any machine with less than 6 Gigs of ram. The question is : will it run, or will it run acceptable ?

> If your W7 install is running perfectly, just download
> the correct version of W10 onto your Desktop & run
> Setup.

There's some things wrong:
- what do you mean with "running perfectly" ? What does that have to do with upgrade ? It usually is a reason not to upgrade.
- The "correct" version ? What is that correct version exactly, and what is the "wrong" one ?
- Onto your "desktop" ? Computers have something called drives, I don't see why it should be on your Desktop.

> It is still FREE.
>

If you paid for it previously, it is yes.


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#5
November 13, 2019 at 09:33:57
I tried installing Windows, but it failed. I have used the Device Manager, and corrected the problems. I will retry installing Windows 10 sometime soon. If the installation still fails there are other things I could do, such as disconnecting most USB devices (one of the recommendations).

I'll let you know when have more information, Uncle Dewey


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#6
November 13, 2019 at 20:33:39
If the direct install does not work you can download the installer as an image to burn a DVD or for a new or wiped flash drive and install it from there. You will get the options or upgrade or clean install. Upgrade saves all of your stuff and clean install wipes it all out and starts over clean.
I always recommend downloading all of your drivers from the system or hardware mfg's sites onto a flash drive so you can upgrade them easily as soon as the install is done.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#7
November 14, 2019 at 10:02:24
I'll have to figure out how to find "all" of my drivers. and save them to a flash drive. I do have a second hard drive which I could save data on--in fact I can backup my primary hard drive to secondary hard drive
before trying to install Windows 10.

Uncle Dewey


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#8
November 14, 2019 at 15:00:42
"....in fact I can backup my primary hard drive to secondary hard drive
before trying to install Windows 10."

A good idea, but you may want to remove (or remove power from) the secondary before the install, just to be certain nothing happens during...

Though I can't say my "little flirtatious run" with Win10 was very interesting....

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."

message edited by T-R-A


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#9
November 14, 2019 at 20:51:41
I have been working on Windows 10 at work and keeping them running well and my daughters have been on it for quite a while now but I have been resisting for myself at home. In fact my latest build was I think the last that supported Windows 7 (Z97 & Devil's Canyon) but I also will have to bite the bullet and switch over to W10 soon. I am not looking forward to this and I feel that my system runs overall better than any I have seen with Windows 10 on it.

Another thing I noted over the years:
Windows XP could run without shutting off or restarting for at least a month without issues.
Windows 7 can easily run a week and often 2 weeks without shutting down or restarting without issues.
Windows 10 must be shut down daily to prevent a build up of issues. This we found out at work because if they were not shut down daily and started fresh in the morning the POS system would begin having issues, mainly with the interface between credit card terminals and the system having errors. Also the Edge browser tends to hold onto more 'junk' which causes errors until closed and reopened and even cleared out (History, etc) at times. I personally prefer Firefox but issues with payments were at least originally less with the Edge browser so I am stuck with it at work.

Needless to say I am not looking forward to updating to W10 (I will not at this time call it upgrading).

The work computers were originally Windows 8 and the upgrade went well and easily so you should be fine and 10 is definitely an upgrade from 8 and 8.1, that part was a plus. Yes, unplug all other hard drives after backing up and before the install to prevent issues.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#10
November 15, 2019 at 00:56:00
If the second drive is empty or has little valued data, why not clear it and use that drive to install windows 10 on? Leave the current windows 7 as is, you can always boot from it if windows 10 has problems.
Or get another empty drive to install Windows 10 on. Price of 1TB HDD are very affordable. Even SSD of 500GB becomes affordable.

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#11
November 15, 2019 at 09:55:21
My primary drive is a 500gb SSD drive while my secondary drive is a high-bred hard drive. I dread having to "upgrade" to Windows 10.

Uncle Dewey


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#12
November 15, 2019 at 14:15:16
It's hard to decide when (or even if) to pull the trigger on it. My reason for reverting back to 7 was all the frustrating updates with a medicore internet connection and a couple of bum updates. Figured I'd stick with 7 as long as I can....still running XP on 1 machine with no issues for that matter...

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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#13
November 15, 2019 at 16:48:00
" Figured I'd stick with 7 as long as I can" And how long is that? Or what will make you decide when to go to Windows 10?

Just pondering, Uncle Dewey


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#14
November 16, 2019 at 06:57:31
" And how long is that? Or what will make you decide when to go to Windows 10?"

As long as the system continues to work and do the daily things I need to do. Updates generally don't concern me too much, since I've hacked enough into the system to pretty much make it as "bullet-proof" as possible. The same goes with the WinXP machine I still use daily (and currently am on). Yes, there's limitations on what I can do with both. I can't watch YouTube or anything similar on the XP machine, but I have a recently-made tablet (free from my CC provider) to do such on. Eventually, both systems will get to the point where they'll be totally useless, but I'm nowhere near that point yet on either, and I'm not one to simply toss out a machine (which I paid good money for) simply because it's considered "useless" or "risky" by most others. I live in an area that isn't likely to get "true broadband" (>6Mb) anytime soon, so I have to make do with what I have. I'm still able to watch most video on the tablet (including free TV services such as PlutoTV) with the ≅ 3MB connection, so I'm satisfied with that....

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."

message edited by T-R-A


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#15
November 16, 2019 at 09:45:44
Well, it's probably obvious that the ones running 7 probably will until the last day. Some until whatever ..

So, 15th of january, I'll be installing some Windows 10's, which I'm testing now ...


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#16
November 16, 2019 at 09:48:13
Multi-boot ... well, I wouldn't advice that to anyone. It technically works, sometimes. And it also is the most difficult setup, compared with virtual solutions and others ..

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#17
November 16, 2019 at 09:54:42
"...obvious that the ones running 7 probably will until the last day. Some until whatever .."

Best advice I ever got: If it ain't broke...

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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#18
November 18, 2019 at 09:07:53
I have been trying to install Windows 10, but without success.The error I got 2-3 times is:
0x8007001f - 0x20046 (could be 0x20006).

The error message also said: An error During Replicate _ oc Operation.

It seems to be a "audio" problem, so I disconnected my external speakers, as well as all USB connections.

Not sure what I'll try next, Uncle Dewey


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#19
November 18, 2019 at 13:13:45
Disconnect all except for keyboard, mouse, and internal parts like graphics cards, etc. Do disconnect all hard drives except the one with Windows on it. If the upgrade fails again, make sure that you have all important stuff saved elsewhere and do a clean install rather than an upgrade install. This will wipe everything so if possible exports even your favorites/bookmarks to later import again.
The clean install will require you to first download the installer and put it on a blank flash drive or burn an install DVD (with the Media Creation tool).
https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/sof...
Once you create the install media you will then boot to it and run it. You will choose the clean install rather than the upgrade install. You will get a warning that all of the information on the hard drive will be wiped clean. To proceed you must OK this but you should have already verified that you have accessible all of you important stuff safely on a drive and unplugged.
Once Windows 10 is installed it should get all updates. As soon as it is done, install your drivers that you already should have downloaded and saved. Next install utilities you like including your antivirus program (unless staying with Windows Defender) and then put back all of your personal stuff and begin making your personal choices on how Windows behaves (as much as they allow).
I recommend passing on opening a Windows/Microsoft 'account' and making your system into a Local account that you control instead of handing over too much control to them. There will be all kinds of warnings but that is fine.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#20
November 18, 2019 at 13:19:56
Yikes! Makes me wonder if I really want to go to Windows 10.

Uncle Dewey


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