Make Windows 7 recognize Linux drives & files

September 3, 2014 at 07:10:42
Specs: Linux x86_64, AMD8-core
Hi all,

Windows 7

I have 3 hard drives on the PC. All of them can be detected by BIOS.

Windows 7 is now running on C-drive. Other 2 drives were formatted on Linux system for storage only but without OS running. Please advise how can I connect them to retrieve files from and to save files as well?

Thanks

Regards
satimis


See More: Make Windows 7 recognize Linux drives & files

Report •

#1
September 3, 2014 at 07:31:40
Windows doesn't read Linux partitions.

Report •

#2
September 3, 2014 at 08:08:56
Hi,

What I expect to do is making those 2 hard drives sharing data between Windows and Linux system. I have another drive on this PC running Debian 7. It can read data on those 2 hard drives but Windows 7 can read them.

Edit
===
Debian 7 can read Windows 7 to retrieve data. But Windows 7 can't read Debian 7 and other 2 drives.


satimis

message edited by satimis


Report •

#3
September 3, 2014 at 08:26:40
There are a small handful of projects out there working on file system drivers. Google's a good starting point.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
September 3, 2014 at 08:37:48
Hi,

Thanks for your advice.

I have been googling a while before posting. There are tons of data on those 2 hard drives for sharing data amongst Linux OS on this PC as well as on other PCs on Intranet. It is impossible for me changing the file system on those 2 hard drives.

satimis


Report •

#5
September 3, 2014 at 08:52:33
Linux can read Windows formated partitions, but Windows cannot natively read Linux formated partitions. Have a look at the 3 programs listed here:

http://www.howtogeek.com/112888/3-w...


Report •

#6
September 3, 2014 at 09:37:32
How about creating a Live Linux disk to read & save data?

Knoppix springs to mind.

https://www.runtime.org/data-recove...

http://danielzstinson.wordpress.com...

A thank you would be nice, if I have helped.


Report •

#7
September 3, 2014 at 12:14:41
The Google link I posted previously is what I would search for. What's the file system on the Linux partitions? From what I'm skimming, Ext2/Ext3 seems to have fairly good support, with Ext4 and other file systems less so. (You'd think 6 years would be enough time, but I guess the demand just isn't there.)

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


Report •

#8
September 3, 2014 at 16:53:50
Maybe this is a way around it.

Ulteo Virtual Desktop
http://www.softpedia.com/get/System...
http://www.softpedia.com/progScreen...
http://www.ulteo.com/home/en/news/2...
http://www.ulteo.com/home/en/downlo...
Enjoy the power of your Linux applications on Windows without the need to reboot.


Report •

#9
Report •

#10
September 3, 2014 at 17:57:32
Hi all,

Lot of thanks for your advice.

Now I find a simple and straightforward solution without making any change on Windows 7. This Windows 7, a bare-metal installation copy, is solely for scanning, in particular the negatives. After scanning I'll leave all image files on Windows 7. Then start up Ubuntu, the host of this Virtual Box PC, and move all files to the storage HD.

Thanks again for your time and effort.

satimis

message edited by satimis


Report •

#11
September 3, 2014 at 21:02:20
You can't avoid changing the drives' file systems, avoid touching the Windows install, and expect Windows to suddenly read a drive it cannot understand. It'd be like pulling out a book written in Spanish, and asking, "How can I read this without learning Spanish and without getting a translated version?"

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


Report •

Ask Question