Solved Laptop fan noisier/starting up more after cleaning?

Dell Inspiron 1545 notebook
September 26, 2013 at 07:35:47
Specs: Windows 7, 4GB
I decided on a whim to clean the fan on my laptop for the first time and now I've noticed my laptop seems to have gotten noisier, as in, the fan seems to start up more often than before.

I had no trouble accessing the fan and followed advice found online to clean the fan; I used compressed air and a very small artists paint brush to gently remove all the dust. I haven't replaced the thermal paste because I hadn't any. I intend to do that if someone would be so good as to advise me on which to buy and how much of it I should use?

But the issue of the extra noise first...

I don't know if my laptop is overheating or not. I downloaded a program called SpeedFan and ran that and the results I got back are:

HD0: 37C
Temp1: 56C
Core 0: 50C
Core 1: 50C


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✔ Best Answer
September 26, 2013 at 20:01:25
The thermal compound aids the thermal heat transfer between the CPU and the heat sink to remove as much heat as possible.
Thermal compound must be in a very thin layer to work best so often when the heat sink is removed, it does not look like much. As mentioned, look up the proper method and reinstall it correctly. Under normal use, there is little difference between a base brand and something expensive that is supposed to be a 'super' compound as long as it is applied correctly.
I do not recommend using the machine without the thermal compound properly reapplied, but in theory, as long as the temperature is within the CPU's normal range, it should be safe and a heating CPU will throttle back or shut down if it gets hot enough. Consider also that you are overworking your fan and that probably will shorten it's life as well.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.



#1
September 26, 2013 at 08:04:01
Hi 31M4,

Temperature seems ok.

Please refer to the link given below and let me know if that helps:

http://dell.to/1bePgpT

Thanks & Regards
Manshu S
#iworkfordell


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#2
September 26, 2013 at 09:33:57
I tried everything on the list and it hasn't made any difference. No errors were found on the diagnostics scan either.

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#3
September 26, 2013 at 12:05:01
If you removed the heat sink then you need to clean off all the original thermal paste/pad and apply new paste. Go to Windows Control panel> System to see what processor you have. Then go to the link below to learn the proper application method to apply thermal paste.

The link is for artic silver but you can use any brand of thermal paste. Thermal paste can be purchased at any computer store or at Radio Shack. Be sure to thoroughly clean off all the old materal from BOTH surfaces. You can use any solvent that leave no residue. I use lacquer thinner but alcohol or lighter fluid work too.

http://www.arcticsilver.com/intel_a...


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Related Solutions

#4
September 26, 2013 at 13:53:30
Thank you, I will do that.

Do you think the fan could be overworking now because I removed the heat sink and disturbed what was left of the old paste? Would it be very detrimental to the machine to go without the thermal paste for a couple of days till I get some?


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#5
September 26, 2013 at 20:01:25
✔ Best Answer
The thermal compound aids the thermal heat transfer between the CPU and the heat sink to remove as much heat as possible.
Thermal compound must be in a very thin layer to work best so often when the heat sink is removed, it does not look like much. As mentioned, look up the proper method and reinstall it correctly. Under normal use, there is little difference between a base brand and something expensive that is supposed to be a 'super' compound as long as it is applied correctly.
I do not recommend using the machine without the thermal compound properly reapplied, but in theory, as long as the temperature is within the CPU's normal range, it should be safe and a heating CPU will throttle back or shut down if it gets hot enough. Consider also that you are overworking your fan and that probably will shorten it's life as well.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#6
September 27, 2013 at 07:08:07
It could be the bearing in the fan itself is going. If it is, the only way to fix that is to replace the fan.

I've replaced a lot of fans over the years (CPU, chipset, PSU, case etc) and am about to replace one on my wife's PC as it recently started making noise. But first I have to figure out which one.........LOL

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#7
September 27, 2013 at 08:51:50
Curt, use a mechanics stethoscope. Harbor Freight Tools sells one cheap.

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#8
October 1, 2013 at 06:45:54
I cleaned off all the old thermal paste and applied the new paste and I must say there has been an immediate improvement; the fan has stopped sounding like it is overworking itself and is behaving the way it used to.

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#9
October 1, 2013 at 19:43:20
We are very glad to hear that. Thank you for getting back to us with the update on this. Enjoy it.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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