Solved Junction point uses disk space

Microsoft Windows 7 ultimate 64-bit
August 9, 2011 at 09:33:46
Specs: Windows 7 Ultimate x64, Intel Core 2 Duo P8700 @ 2,53 GHz
Hello,

I'm running Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on my machine.
Since I didn't want to install my programs on the Windows partition, I booted into safe mode and moved the "Program Files" and the "Program Files (x86)" folders to a different partition. Afterwards, I created junction points on the Windows partition which point to the folders on the other partition.
Here's the problem: The disk space management system of Windows 7 recognizes the junction points on my Windows partition as real folders with real data and decreases disk space on both partitions when I install new programs.
I used the "Link Shell Extension" tool to create the junction points.
(http://schinagl.priv.at/nt/hardlinkshellext/hardlinkshellext.html)
How can I configure Windows so that it doesn't detect the junction points as real folders?

Thanks for Your help.

Best regards,

Lysander H.


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✔ Best Answer
August 9, 2011 at 11:47:18
I don't want to call you on this but I think you may not know how to change the install path.

Most times all that is required is to highlight the path shown and then change the drive letter while leaving the rest of the label. Some programs will only allow you to change the path if you choose the custom install option, which, IMO, is the way to always install programs.

If you could, list those 6 programs you couldn't change the path on.

According to the linked Wiki article, junction points should not take up any space.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NTFS_j...

Also see the second link below.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/lib...



#1
August 9, 2011 at 09:36:26
This seems overly complicated. Almost all programs that I have encountered allow you to choose the installation location.

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#2
August 9, 2011 at 10:04:46
You are right, but still, it's an inconvenient process to change the installation directory every single time, plus there are enough programs that don't allow it, and all the standard Windows applications remain on the Windows partition and take up disk space.
Is there a direct solution to my problem or would I be better off using a different method, like changing the default paths in the registry?

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#3
August 9, 2011 at 10:41:45
Changing the default path is not a viable option. Some programs need to be installed on the boot partition. What is the big deal about changing the path? How often do you install new programs?

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#4
August 9, 2011 at 10:53:37
I've got my installs spread over a couple of disks. i can't say that it's a great deal of trouble to change the install path every once in a while.

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#5
August 9, 2011 at 11:42:07
I actually tried it with changing the install path manually and encountered at least 6 programs that wouldn't let me change the install path.
For me, the more elegant solution are junction points, since they offer a very clean way of seperating Windows from additional programs and personal data.
Does anybody have an idea why Windows misdetects the junction points?

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#6
August 9, 2011 at 11:47:18
✔ Best Answer
I don't want to call you on this but I think you may not know how to change the install path.

Most times all that is required is to highlight the path shown and then change the drive letter while leaving the rest of the label. Some programs will only allow you to change the path if you choose the custom install option, which, IMO, is the way to always install programs.

If you could, list those 6 programs you couldn't change the path on.

According to the linked Wiki article, junction points should not take up any space.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NTFS_j...

Also see the second link below.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/lib...


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