Solved Is there any partition manager can be used without rebooting

October 13, 2012 at 19:54:09
Specs: Windows 7, 4GB
I need to partition local disk with system files without rebooting?

Is there a secure way?


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✔ Best Answer
November 7, 2012 at 02:10:20
I ran the Linux Mint Live cd, and used the option to install. It installed into a folder in the root of the system drive, and has never given me any trouble. It solved all of (feeble and few) Linux needs, it supports NTFS, and did't involve anytning "invasive" to my system. It was also free. It's based on Umbuntu. What I know the most about Linux is that I hate it, so I can't be much help with that, but I do know Windows, and this was the best Linux solution for it. Everything else I have ever tried to get Linux to co-exist with Windows on my pc have been disasterous, to say the least. That "grub" ate my VBR, never again. I distinctly remember wanting to kill penquins really, really, bad, and for a long time. I found this because I was trying live cd versions of linux, looking for a non invasive (and hopefully non-disaterous), semi permanent or even temporary Linux solution, and the install into Windows option of Linux Mint was PERFECT for me, and the first and only thing that actually worked, and didn't crash my Windows system for my effort.

I'm a toxic agent, on a dangerous mission so secret, that even I don't know what it is, because if I did, I would have to kill myself.



#1
October 13, 2012 at 20:51:49
Explain why.

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#2
October 13, 2012 at 23:50:01
I have 230 GB Size of local disk C with me.That was the size i could minimize using windows partition re sizer. Now i need to install Linux parallel. Installing Linux and windows in same partition can cause failure of both OS during some system crash.

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#3
October 14, 2012 at 00:09:00
You're right. Why not shrink the C Volume and reboot? Then create the Linux partition.

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#4
October 15, 2012 at 05:57:56
I have already shrienked the partition to 230 gb..Most of the part is vacant and unused.

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#5
October 21, 2012 at 17:56:35
when i search Google most partition managers is only showing how to extend.But what i need is to reduce system partition.

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#6
October 21, 2012 at 20:42:02
If you have unallocated space ("Vacant") then you need to partition it for Linux and format it (Linux). Windows cannot do this for Linux and you cannot do it at all with Windows running but any Linux installer can do this or any number of other partition programs that work outside of Windows.
If you do not have unallocated space (check in Disk Manager) then you should add another drive because unless you have another partition for your programs and files, 230GB is about as small as you should go for Windows 7 (including programs and files).
If you cannot shrink the drive further but have all of your files and most of your programs on another drive or partition, then there are a few things that you can try to allow you to shrink it further. Turning off your paging file (virtual memory) on that drive temporarily (turning it on on another drive will make the machine more usable during the transition) and reducing the amount of space allocated to System Restore. I do not recommend turning off system restore because if something happens, you may need the restore points that you would loose by turning it off.

IMPORTANT---> There are always risks when dealing with partitioning so make sure that you back up all important files and consider making an image of your C drive in case you have a major problem (like deleting or formatting the wrong drive or something worse).

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.
---- Save Big Bird -----


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#7
October 31, 2012 at 09:26:25
Try the windows disk manager utility. Shrink your system partition, and create a new one in the the unpartitioned space you made, but DON'T format it, as Linux will likely want to use an EXT file system. The disk manager is at C:\Windows\System32\diskmgmt.msc

However, before you go any farther, I would strongly suggest that you look into something called "Linux Mint". This is a Linux system that was specificly designed to exist within a Windows partition, I have it installed on mine, and have never had any issues with it, other than when running it, you can't access the windows parts at all, if I remember correctly. I avoid Linux like the plauge, and only put this in to recompile a linux based operating system for a wireless router. It was a while ago. This will involve no work to your hard drive, and poses no risk. It's also free.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linux_...
http://www.linuxmint.com/

I'm a toxic agent, on a dangerous mission so secret, that even I don't know what it is, because if I did, I would have to kill myself.


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#8
November 2, 2012 at 12:02:20
How big is the hard drive in total?

if its 500gb and you have that 230gb windows partition and the rest is vacant space. When you go into disk management.

Then all you need to do is reboot with your linux disk in and install it just when asked where to install it. pick THE VACANT SPACE.. :)

not the windows partition or something.
There will be no issues. Windows and Linux will not mess with each others drives be default


If however your drive is 230gb and no space left, then you need to resize that windows partition to be smaller. Depending on what kind of Linux your installing you will need atleast 40GB.

Now... If for some reason your trying to install Linux like ubuntu into that windows partition. This can be done , for ubuntu just reboot with the disk in and its an option. For other vers of Linux (backtrack comes to mind) this is still an option. however you now have two OS running off the same NTFS partition. This Can cause problems but might not

Cheers


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#9
November 7, 2012 at 02:10:20
✔ Best Answer
I ran the Linux Mint Live cd, and used the option to install. It installed into a folder in the root of the system drive, and has never given me any trouble. It solved all of (feeble and few) Linux needs, it supports NTFS, and did't involve anytning "invasive" to my system. It was also free. It's based on Umbuntu. What I know the most about Linux is that I hate it, so I can't be much help with that, but I do know Windows, and this was the best Linux solution for it. Everything else I have ever tried to get Linux to co-exist with Windows on my pc have been disasterous, to say the least. That "grub" ate my VBR, never again. I distinctly remember wanting to kill penquins really, really, bad, and for a long time. I found this because I was trying live cd versions of linux, looking for a non invasive (and hopefully non-disaterous), semi permanent or even temporary Linux solution, and the install into Windows option of Linux Mint was PERFECT for me, and the first and only thing that actually worked, and didn't crash my Windows system for my effort.

I'm a toxic agent, on a dangerous mission so secret, that even I don't know what it is, because if I did, I would have to kill myself.


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