I hate Win 7 Upgrade from Win XP

Hewlett-packard Ms windows server 2003 r...
January 5, 2010 at 09:02:34
Specs: Windows XP 32 bit, Quad Core / 4Gig
I got Windows 7 Ultimate for Christmas (Yay) but when I got home to install it I was let down. I am currently running a Windows XP SP3 and when I installed Windows 7 it said that I could not upgrade Windows XP.

*FINE*

So I ran my Windows VISTA upgrade on the computer as unregistered because I will register once I get Windows 7 installed. That went fine but then I found that you have to be at atleast SP1.

*FINE*

So I ran all of the Updates...155 updates and 8 hours later I was ready for Windows 7 but no they discontinued the Ultimate Extras in Windows 7 so I had to install those too. 3 Hours later I am ready for Windows 7 and I begin the install at 3:00PM yesterday and at 7:00AM today it is only 62% done.

So my original question was how long does it take? but I found this...

http://blogs.zdnet.com/Bott/?p=1299

20 Hours are you kidding me. So 20+8+3 is a total of a whopping 31 Hours.


There has to be a better way. Any suggestion on how to trim this time down because I am looking at upgrading our XP systems at work to Windows 7?

I am planning on doing one system then Disk imaging it but some one has to have a solution to this.


See More: I hate Win 7 Upgrade from Win XP

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#1
January 5, 2010 at 09:41:43
I have seen some versions of Vista can not be upgraded to Win 7.....better perform a full installation !

Google is your friend

www.google.com

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#2
January 5, 2010 at 11:04:34
Upgrading from XP requires a clean install.
For instructions on upgrading from XP go to:
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-au/...

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#3
January 5, 2010 at 11:31:57
Oops...I mentoned Vista....LoL....

Nevertheless, it`s same for XP....I recommend clean installation....

Google is your friend

www.google.com

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Related Solutions

#4
January 5, 2010 at 11:44:45
Yes, you can use an upgrade version of Windows 7 with WinXP.

Why would you go through all the work of upgrading to Vista and then installing a SP.

Just backup your personal files and install on a clean partition.

What version of WinXP did you have and what version of Windows 7 are you upgrading to?


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#5
January 5, 2010 at 11:49:03
Yes, you can use an upgrade version of Windows 7 with WinXP.

True but it is not supported - see this official upgrade path link posted at M$ site.

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/...

i_Xp/Vista/W7User


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#6
January 5, 2010 at 12:03:16
Ace

What version of Windows 7 utimate did you get? A full version or an upgrade version?

If an upgrade version then what you should have done is to backup your personal files and format the partition. Start the installation and if prompted, supply the WinXP CD. That is a clean install using the upgrade version.

Full versions come in Retail or OEM for system builders. THe OEM for system builders must be installed to a clean partition. After all, they are meant for a new PC. The retail version can be used but it will simply save all your old data in a file called Windows.old. You are still getting a clean install.


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#7
January 5, 2010 at 12:16:47
I have the Upgrade. I did not want to format and start again because it would mean that I would have to reinstall all of my applications which could take days.

As for the current status, I checked on my computer at lunch and found that it was still at 62%. I rebooted the computer because it was obviously crashed. It detected that I did not do a complete install and reverted back to Vista.

I also don't want to lose the Extra Features that came with Vista Ultimate as a result of doing a clean install.

I am going to try install SP2 and see if that makes a difference but you would think Microsoft could have made the Upgrade program better. My Vista upgrade went smooth and easy but this 7 upgrade sucks.


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#8
January 5, 2010 at 12:29:37
What`s the current OS version and what`s the Win 7 version that you are trying to update to ?

Google is your friend

www.google.com

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#9
January 5, 2010 at 13:59:39
"I also don't want to lose the Extra Features that came with Vista Ultimate as a result of doing a clean install."

"I got Windows 7 Ultimate for Christmas"

Are you saying there are features in Vista Utimate that are NOT in Windows 7 Ultimate?

I am pretty sure you will end up re-installing all your programs anyway. Besides which you already have a couple of days invested and you are no closer than when you started.


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#10
January 5, 2010 at 18:58:15
I agree.... Definately a clean install!!
My XP rig was just a little too old (8 years) - no more upgrade room, old non compatible board, etc. So I saved all my stuff on one hard drive, built a new computer included the hard drive as a second drive, and loaded a new OEM Windows 7. I gathered all hardware, all drivers, utilities, software and keys and did all of my homework. >> The machine was built in a couple of hours actual work, another 2 hours for Windows to format the new hard drive, and maybe another couple hours to install my programs and personalize everything (including reformatting the secondary drive clean for use as a back up destination). TOTAL time probably less than 7 hours!!!
If your machines at work are nearly identical, gather everything you need to reinstall, back up everything on your network, format and install clean, add back your needed programs (leave out what you never use), personalize until you are happy, and then clone away! (Any problems left over from a half hearted install will be a problem for all of your machines once you clone, so do it right!)

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#11
January 5, 2010 at 19:11:05
My most recent installation of Windows 7 over the weekend took approximately 20 minutes & it was on a Prescott (P4) system with 2GB of RAM. It was a full install using an upgrade install media. A clean install is always the way to go & opting to run an upgrade install was a choice you made despite the disclaimer from M$ & others.

Moreover, we don't know what type of machine you have & what all you got going on the XP install that you were trying to upgrade. I don't expect everyone upgrading from XP to Windows 7 to spend the same amount of time as you did, but the upgrade install is expected to exceed the time a clean install would take.

Good luck!

Windows 7 News!


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#12
January 6, 2010 at 07:57:21
I think you miss the point. An upgrade is an upgrade. To expect a clean install is ridicules. It took time to install all of the apps like

- MS-Office
- SQL Server
(A real Pain to reinstall but since 7 does not support the old Power Shell and you have to upgrade it anyways.)
- Media players and codexes
- Games (Another Pain to reinstall)
- Flash Player, Java, Silver Light and all of the other Web stuff.
- IIS
(Another pain to reinstall exspecially if you have some pages being hosted.)
- Open source software which takes forever to configure.

Most of these settings are stored in the registry and why you can backup the registry I doubt you can restore it after Windows 7 has done a clean install. Microsoft needs to get their act together if they expect companies to upgrade their systems to 7. Granted I would not have to worry about the games at work but all of the rest would apply.


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#13
January 6, 2010 at 08:23:50
You are the one missing the point. The only thing different when using an upgrade disk is that Windows 7 may preserve your files in My Computer. From what I have read it will backup all your other files to folders called *.old. I could be wrong.

At any rate as I, and others have already pointed out, you have spent more time trying to save time than you would have used to re-install from scratch. I can only conclude that you may not have disks for some programs.

You do understand that at least some of your software may not run under Windows 7. That could be the reason why it is taking so long.

As far as companies migrating to Windows 7 goes, they won't be running all the junk you have on your rig. Efficient companies buy many of the same exact configuration of computer and broadcast the final image to many at once so it isn't an issue for them. The only reason business users hesitate is because they want the bugs worked out and want drivers available. Also need compatibility with specialized propitiatory software they use.


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#14
January 6, 2010 at 09:31:18
as far as companies go, you can download the enterprise version from tech net, and try it on a few machines and know what you will need to change/upgrade, before commiting..

but i also recommend a full fresh instal, although i have done upgrades from vista and it works perfectly. Xp did take take a little longer but with updated service packs, it wasnt a big issue..

i hate computers!
but cant help myself....


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#15
January 6, 2010 at 21:02:22
7 stuck at 62% for that long sounds like a hardware issue

WinXp Amd 64 3000 Msi Neo2 Platinuim 1 gig ddr 400. When we cast a pebble into a pond we should look past the first ripple.


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#16
January 6, 2010 at 21:06:11
Installed 7 (clean or upgrade) a few times and usually takes 25 to 30 minutes

WinXp Amd 64 3000 Msi Neo2 Platinuim 1 gig ddr 400. When we cast a pebble into a pond we should look past the first ripple.


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#17
January 6, 2010 at 22:14:44
If you do your homework.... Gather all of your disc's and download new all of downloadable software (opensource, antivirus, other utilities, games, etc.) and any drivers you might need for your hardware so you have the most compatible versions and put them on a flash drive or an external hard drive. This will save you the most down time. Edit out things you no longer use. The more prepared you are, the happier you will be AND a clean install is ALWAYS going to allow the machine to run at it's fastest potential. [It's like cleaning out your garage or basement storage areas, it's a job you dread, but you are happier when it is done any you can live with the results.] It will feel like a new toy again.

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#18
January 7, 2010 at 04:12:09
"I have the Upgrade. I did not want to format and start again because it would mean that I would have to reinstall all of my applications which could take days."

So you rather have gone through all of that with a mangled mess of old xp and vista files that added a lot of excess clutter in your Windows 7 OS, then just doing a clean install by going out and buying an OEM full version of Windows 7 and installing Windows 7 cleanly even if it took a few days to get everything back up? Wow.....

Iron Sharpens Iron.


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#19
January 8, 2010 at 19:50:26
The clean install can be done on the XP machine with the upgrade DVD.
End, everything already said, go back and read again.

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#20
January 9, 2010 at 05:29:16
Have a look at this link. One thing that jumps out is that you should disable any AV software prior to starting.

http://clubhouse.microsoft.com/Publ...


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