Solved HP g7-1002as Bios corrupted

February 22, 2017 at 09:10:49
Specs: Windows 7
Hi Guys I am hoping you can help….. I have an HP G7-1002sa Laptop. All I have is a blank screen on trying to fire up every time, nothing else. I have tried to piggy back the hard drive onto my other laptop and the hard drive seems to appear and then disappear without being able to read it so I would assume the hdd is knackered, also it clicks continually.
Okay, so I have tried getting into bios which happened once or twice and I did manage to change the boot up sequence to usb. I formatted a usb stick with Rufus and downloaded sp57396.exe from hp. (Their instructions for repairing the bios are absolute rubbish and impossible) Okay, so I have extracted 0165CF52.bin, 0165EF52.bin and 03564F52 from the exe file and tried each one at a time to try and flash my bios holding the Win and B keys whilst plugging in power…… NOTHING…:-( on any of them. Am I doing something wrong? I have tried with the HDD in and out, which is best? I assumed that as the bios is on the motherboard it would make no difference. CAN ANYONE HELP?? PLEASE!!

Forgot to say that at one time the capslock and num lock were flashing twice but now they don't, don't know if that is relevant. Cheers


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✔ Best Answer
February 25, 2017 at 07:08:53
"Interested in your crazy fix"

OK, you asked for it. I don't know if you ever heard of baking a motherboard or graphics card in the oven to repair defective solder connections? This fix is a twist on that idea. Instead of using the oven, you overheat the laptop by blocking the cooling vents. What you do is start the laptop, then wrap the main body (not the screen) in a towel or blanket. Make sure the cooling vents are blocked off & the body is well wrapped so the heat builds up inside. Leave it like that for about an hour, then unwrap it & hold the power button until it shuts down. Let it cool down for a while, then see if it will boot.



#1
February 22, 2017 at 09:58:06
Why would you think that flashing the BIOS was going to fix things if the hard drive is dead. Hard drive or not, you should be able to boot into the BIOS. If you can do that, then there is no reason to flash the BIOS.

If you see video on the screen when you first start up the laptop and then when it tries to boot into Windows you get the black screen I would guess the hard drive is corrupted. If it is clicking, then you may have crashed the heads or something just as fatal.

Try booting to the BIOS again by tapping the correct key at startup (should appear on screen). If the hard drive listing shows there then there is probably mechanical damage to the drive.

If you can no longer boot into the BIOS (setup) then you may have pooched your BIOS.


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#2
February 22, 2017 at 17:13:18
.. and if you've pooched your BIOS then most likely this is a new fault in addition to the HD failure.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#3
February 23, 2017 at 13:32:55
For starters, it helps to post the correct model number. You have a Pavilion g7-1002sa.

http://support.hp.com/us-en/documen...

I've worked on a couple of these & they have a problem known as black screen syndrome. The fix is kinda crazy but it has worked for me. Before I explain, what happens when you attempt to boot the laptop? If the Caps Lock is flashing, it's a code. See the following:

http://h20564.www2.hp.com/hpsc/doc/...


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#4
February 24, 2017 at 12:08:18
Hi Riider, thanks for response, didn't know that the lowercase g was an important part of the model number......... No, the caps lock and num lock are not flashing, although at one time the two were flashing twice. Interested in your crazy fix. Cheers

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#5
February 24, 2017 at 12:52:14
I'm not riider but just to clarify, I think the problem with the model number was "as" for "sa". Easily done.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#6
February 25, 2017 at 07:08:53
✔ Best Answer
"Interested in your crazy fix"

OK, you asked for it. I don't know if you ever heard of baking a motherboard or graphics card in the oven to repair defective solder connections? This fix is a twist on that idea. Instead of using the oven, you overheat the laptop by blocking the cooling vents. What you do is start the laptop, then wrap the main body (not the screen) in a towel or blanket. Make sure the cooling vents are blocked off & the body is well wrapped so the heat builds up inside. Leave it like that for about an hour, then unwrap it & hold the power button until it shuts down. Let it cool down for a while, then see if it will boot.


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#7
February 25, 2017 at 08:11:40
Thanks Riider, yes I have cooked a video card three times actually and 3 times it worked but I don't think I am quite ready for the drastic action on this one yet....:-)

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#8
March 1, 2017 at 10:14:58
Cripes, solder melts at around 360F so things must get darned hot inside to do this. I'm rather surprised but life is full of surprises.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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