How to view Windows 7 IE8 Temporary Internet Files?

September 27, 2014 at 04:45:55
Specs: Win 7
I'm using Internet Explorer 8, which gets installed with Windows 7.

I used the Internet Options dialog to move Temporary Internet Files to
drive E:. It works fine.

Except that when I try to view those files, I can only see a very limited
subset of them. Mostly favicons. By looking at the drive with Ubuntu,
I can see that the Temporary Internet Files folder has sub-folders
Content.IE5 and Low. Low, in turn, has a Content.IE5 sub-folder.
The favicons are in the first Content.IE5 folder, while the vast bulk
of the files are in the Low\Content.IE5 folder. How can I view them
in Windows?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


See More: How to view Windows 7 IE8 Temporary Internet Files?

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#1
September 27, 2014 at 05:29:58
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/...

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/...

IMHO, temp internet & history files should be dumped, not saved. I have my browsers configured to delete them as soon as the browser is closed. Plus I run CCleaner several times a day. Also, you should update to IE11. IE8 is outdated, rapidly losing support, & most importantly, it's not as secure.

http://www.zdnet.com/after-seven-mo...

http://searchengineland.com/google-...

http://www.techtimes.com/articles/1...

message edited by riider


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#2
September 27, 2014 at 15:02:57
Bear in mind that in some areas (such as this) Windows presents things to you in a user friendly fashion. Looking at the HD with Linux will show the true locations but also allow you into places where MS don't wish you to go.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#3
September 27, 2014 at 15:53:56
Yeah viewing them through windows is complicated. You can at least see the files by using command prompt. IE 8 on my XP (and with all earlier windows versions) put the TIF in randomly named folders within content.ie5. Content.ie5 is a hidden system folder as are usually some of the folders within it so you'd need to do a DIR/A:S to list them.

I guess if you're not familiar with dos/command prompt that's going to be complicated too.

message edited by DAVEINCAPS


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Related Solutions

#4
September 27, 2014 at 16:54:26
I haven't used the command prompt very much with Windows 7, but
considering how similar it is to DOS, I should be able to. I see that
you are right, the "Low" folder and its contents are viewable from
the command prompt.

(Is there an NT equivalent of the term "DOS box"?)

I'll find out if I can use the command prompt in place of Explorer.

I thought I posted after Derek but before Dave, saying that the
inability to view the files seems like a bug. Possibly caused by
moving the folder, but also possibly caused by some setting I
may have changed. That post seems to have vanished.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#5
September 27, 2014 at 17:42:38
In my #2 I was referring to the normal unchanged location - not sure what happens when it is shifted but I wouldn't have thought the path structure ought to change. It's just that what you see in Windows is not reality.

Not sure what you meant by DOS Box. There is an emulator program with that name that I have working fine on Win 8.1 64 bit but I can't see the connection so I doubt that's what you mean.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#6
September 27, 2014 at 19:04:34
By 'dos box' do you mean the window that opens when you run command prompt? Oh, and ALT ENTER toggles between box and full screen.

I think if you move the default location for the TIF the contents in the previous location are deleted.

In most cases command prompt works exactly like dos, especially the basic commands so if you know one, you know the other too.


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#7
September 27, 2014 at 19:39:28
By "DOS box" I just meant a window DOS runs in. It is shorter
to type than "command prompt", but the command prompt isn't
DOS so I can't honestly call it a "DOS box"... "CMD box"?

I cleared the TIF folder before moving it, but I'm sure it gets
cleared by moving it, too.

I wonder if some security setting I altered could prevent me from
viewing the lower-security Temporary Internet Files.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#8
September 27, 2014 at 22:18:45
I don't think it's a security setting. On this XP/IE8 with the showing of hidden and system files enbled I can open Local Settings--Temporary Internet Files and the files show (at least some of them). But some of the cookies also show there--even though that's not where they're stored.

It doesn't show the randomly named folders that hold the actual files nor even content.ie5 which contain those folders. It's just the screwy way windows and/or IE has decided to do things. Command prompt is the only way I know to get to their actual location.


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#9
September 28, 2014 at 04:33:52
It's been a long time since I moved the TIF folder. I know I was able
to view the files the normal way at some time in the past, but I don't
know if it changed when I moved the folder or at some other time.

It clearly has *some* connection to security, since the favicons and
the few other files I can see are in the main Content.IE5 folder, while
those I can't see -- the vast majority -- are in the Low folder.

I'm asking because I plan to do a clean reinstall of Windows soon.
So I should have an opportunity to find what causes the problem...

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#10
September 28, 2014 at 11:09:45
OK, it's just that "DOS Box" happens to have a specific meaning (it finds that emulator program if you put it in Google). To get to the DOS like Window you want, the easiest way is to just type cmd in search. This will show cmd.exe in the list above and you can click it open it from there. If you need to use it a lot you could always make a desktop shortcut to it.

Another way to get there is to bring up the Run box and type cmd in there. [You can use Windows key + R to bring up the Run box if you wish - lots of ways].

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#11
September 28, 2014 at 11:31:04
All I meant was a way to refer to the command prompt when typing
posts like this one that is shorter than typing "command prompt".

I guess you're right that the term primarily refers to an emulator
program, but I'd seen it used so much to refer to running DOS in
Windows, and it was such a long time ago, that I forgot.

The term "command prompt" just seems wrong. It is more than the
prompt! Isn't there a short, cutsie name for it?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#12
September 28, 2014 at 12:28:21
Don't know of any neat name for "command prompt". Yes you can do all the dos type things there but some commands have changed a bit over the years. Here's the Windows 7 list just in case you haven't seen it :
http://commandwindows.com/windows7-...

EDIT:
Oops misunderstood the bit about typing out "command prompt" and have just realised who you are Jeff, so sorry about being far too basic - I've seen you on here as a helper many times over the years.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#13
September 29, 2014 at 00:49:37
I used to call command prompt 'dos' but that would infuriate all the dos purists. Even though command prompt works and looks like dos--and that was something microsoft had to intentionally do--they would always have to point out that they weren't the same. Here's one example:

http://www.computing.net/answers/do...


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#14
October 5, 2014 at 13:21:10
I re-installed Windows.as I said I planned to do, but by a rather
freaky coincidence, I was forced to do it because I ran some
command prompt command which made Windows unbootable.
I don't remember what the command was (maybe FSUTIL), but
I think it was suggested in another thread. Not this thread.

Anyway, I moved the TIF cache again, and again I'm unable to
view the files by the normal method. I can only see favicons, one
lone cookie, and two other minor files. The vast bulk of stuff in
the "Low" folder is invisible. Can this be fixed?

Also, why would that one cookie be with the favicons?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

message edited by Jeff Root


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#15
October 8, 2014 at 15:22:20
Silly question probably but are you 100% certain that their visibility changed when you moved them?

To be certain the move was the culprit you would have to use the internet for some time before making the shift and carefully watch the contents so that you can make a valid comparison. Bear in mind that CCleaner (if you are using it) will clear most them each time.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#16
October 9, 2014 at 05:22:26
I definitely do NOT know whether the change occurred when I
moved the folder. I could have tested that the other day before
moving it, but didn't. I think I'll test it today by moving it back.

Security zones obviously have something to do with it, but I don't
know what. For some reason the favicons and a small handful
of other files are apparently considered safe, and are not stored
in the "Low" folder along with the rest of the files

Right now three cookies are in the same folder with the favicons.
They seem to be from random sites. Nothing distinguishes them
from the other cookies.

I first moved the folder maybe two years ago, and noticed some
time later that only a few files were visible. When I run CCleaner,
which I do at very erratic intervals, I always have it delete cookies
but only occasionally have it delete TIF.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#17
October 9, 2014 at 07:54:32
"I think I'll test it today by moving it back"

If you do so let us know how it looks please.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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