how to properly start up windows 7?

Gigabyte Geforce gtx 650 ti boost video...
September 17, 2014 at 07:39:39
Specs: Windows 7 ultimate, 2/8
cant start windows, cant start in safe mode, getting a sign "windows cannot complete installation in safe mode. To continue installning windows, restart the computer" but when i restart... it only freezes at the windows startup...

also, this happened today, when red waves are crossing all over the screen, se link:
https://imageshack.com/i/id9KgSQZj

(the product entered below doesnt match, had to enter something)


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#1
September 17, 2014 at 08:23:13
Were you trying to re-install Windows or did this just suddenly happen? Just wondering if there was some background to this issue arriving.

Sometimes this procedure can unstick things:
Turn off the computer and disconnect from domestic power. If it's a laptop remove the main battery too. Now hold the Power Off/On button down for about 20 seconds. See if it helps when you've put it back together.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#2
September 17, 2014 at 10:59:56
watched youtube yesterday, when the screen freezed, and it came red waves flashing all over the screen. Restarted the computer, and windows 7 repair started, then it said it could not repair it self... so windows just rebooted time after time. So i tried to format my harddrive and reinstall windows.

Now it looks like this:

first this comes up: https://imageshack.com/i/iqzSa8sIj
then this: https://imageshack.com/i/f0D67pL8j
then: https://imageshack.com/i/eysOGRx8j (note, i cant start in safe mode)
last, it freezes here: https://imageshack.com/i/exvq8bCSj

message edited by ulle73


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#3
September 17, 2014 at 11:04:14
Looks like your video card died.

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Related Solutions

#4
September 17, 2014 at 11:25:05
is it just to remove the old one, and put a new one in?

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#5
September 17, 2014 at 12:10:33
It'd be my first step.
Second step would be to realize it's built into the MB.

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#6
September 17, 2014 at 14:26:51
Just in case you are not aware of the situation, many computers (but not all) have a video chip as part of the motherboard. Others have an actual card, which might or might not have been added on. If it's a video chip, one way around it is to add a card instead.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#7
September 17, 2014 at 20:47:53
First, While the vertical lines may indicate a video card or chip issue, the fact that the monitor is still showing the attempts to start and showing the problems, it is not the video that is the primary issue here.
Second, List your system specs in detail for us to have as a reference.
Third, a systematic approach is required.
----> Boot to a CD prepared with Memtest86 on it to test the RAM for errors. Report Results. No errors here are acceptable.
----> Boot to a CD prepared with Seatools (Seagate) on it (or equivilent hard drive test software from hard drive mfg.) and run the short test. Report Results. Minor errors can be fixed during the test, major problems cannot be fixed.
----> Depending on these results, we can recommend further testing as needed.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#8
September 17, 2014 at 21:19:43
Fingers: it is not the video that is the primary issue here
Got anything to indicate that?

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#9
September 18, 2014 at 01:20:13
Try booting with a Linux dish; typically ubuntu (ubuntu.com). Download the (free) iso, burn to a dvd, boot with that dvd.

As it will not involve the hard drive at this time, the OS will load into RAM only, it will in effect be a system check.

If there is an issue with RAM then the OS (a Linux variant) will not load properly. If there is no problem with on-board RAM, and there is no sharing of RAM by/for display yet the display is still as in your image (unlocked red lines as would seen on a crt tv display with poor or no line hold...) it might point to the card (if a plug-in one) or the on-board chip (if no plug-in card present).

If there is a plug-in card present, have you removed it and tried booting using the on-board display chip? Although if I interpret your info thus far, you are using an on-board display adapter. Presuming so, can you borrow a plug-in card and see if it will allow a boot up?

Besides testing with a Linux disk, have you tried to boot with a Windows disk - any version? You wouldn't actually install it of course; merely testing the system hardware (RAM and display adapter not the least). Although if shared RAM involved... you may still get the same results as you have already posted; which is where the Linux approach is likely more useful a test.

Finger's suggestion that this is not a display adapter issue is interesting. I'm not sure how the Windows error message is actually derived, and inserted over what appears to be a display with no, or poor, line hold (as per a crt display above). The Linux dvd boot might help determine what is amiss; and support the idea that the problem is not the display adapter?

message edited by trvlr


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#10
September 18, 2014 at 07:04:28
Working theory is the first DIMM is bad, and the video chip gets its share from this DIMM. That'd require integrated video. Testing the RAM is probably best done without using large chunks of it for the display. Also, the corrupted video is the problem we see, so I'd rather deal with the issues in front of us instead of chasing gremlins.

If this is an upgradeable PC, get a $20-$25 video card, plug it in, and disable the on-board from the BIOS if you have the option. Then run memory tests.

If the tests come back clean, see if you can get Windows running/installed.

If the tests come back dirty, test one stick at a time until you find the bad one. If they call come back bad, the MB/CPU is bad. At that point, it'd be cheaper to get a new PC.

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#11
September 18, 2014 at 21:18:39
The lines I see on the images would indicate a video card, onboard video, or monitor going. Since the image appears but is overlaid with the lines, the video is at least working marginally. This would not make it impossible to reinstall Windows, just difficult to read all instructions. Freezing at start up might be a video driver but would not effect Safe Mode starting, nor would it effect booting to the install DVD (which I am not sure was tried yet upon rereading the initial post). Booting to the Windows 7 install DVD, Memtest CD, or a Linux disk would each help by eliminating or confirming the issue is or is not related to the hard drive or the Windows installation.
Trying a basic video card would certainly confirm or eliminate the video issues but if the machine is not very new, the OP may not want to invest too much on an experiment without confirming that all issues can be solved without spending too much more money than that. Depending on the ultimate uses, an upgrade video may be money better spent than a cheap video card in the long run.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#12
September 19, 2014 at 01:19:27
The tag on the original post seems to say that the video board
is a pretty high-end model. It even has *two* fans!

Can we locate a website that clearly identifies various video
problems by the visible symptoms? The screen shots provided
here should be very telling of that particular aspect of the problem.
Maybe a taxonomy of video problems has already been posted
right here on computing.net.

I suspect that there is a connection between the video problem
and the error messages, but I can't imagine what it could be.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#13
September 19, 2014 at 03:12:48
Jeff Root:

Well spotted (Grasshopper - shades of certain tv show way back when...)

I had presumed from the truncated tag info (it doesn't display fully) that the tag was referring to a Gigabyte motherboard...

Knowing now that there "is" a plug-in video adapter involved, I would suggest removing it; reverting to to on-board display adapter and seeing what ails (if anything).

If the problems disappear... case solved - replace/renew the plug-in card?

If the fault persists with that card removed and system now using the on-board card... then need to consider other possibilities?


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#14
September 21, 2014 at 03:18:18
I've had add-on video cards give me problems, that were solved simply by removing, then re-seating the card.

Please let us know if you found someone's advice to be helpful.
Failure to install up-to-date anti-virus makes you as much to blame as the virus creators.


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#15
September 21, 2014 at 19:36:26
The OP has not answered since Sept. 17th, I suggest we wait for responses to already suggested material before 'talking' around them.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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