Solved How to create a system image of Windows 7 Drive C

Gigabyte Gigabyte ga-z77x-d3h & intel co...
June 18, 2015 at 11:45:39
Specs: Windows 7, Intel Core I5 3.3
I have had problems creating restore discs in the past. What is a good web site for creating a system image for Windows 7?

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✔ Best Answer
June 20, 2015 at 05:34:13
Windows Backup allows you to make a back up of your personal files and settings.
Windows Backup allows you to make an image of a partition or an entire drive.
Windows Repair Disk is bootable and has the tools to reimage a drive from a stored image made from Windows Backup.
I am not sure how your system is set up but I recommend at least two partitions, one for Windows and your programs and one for your data. This way you can more easily define your back up and much more easily (and faster) make the important image of your C drive with your operating system and programs. Doing it this way you have a two step process if catastrophe happens and you need to replace the hard drive or wipe it and start over. The process would be to delete the partition (using the Windows 7 install disk) or replace the drive, pop in the Repair Disk and reload the disk image. Then if needed, recover your back up, run Windows Update, and you are done.
Other programs are not needed but there are a few that also can do this, just make sure that you have or create their recovery disks as well if you go this route.
External hard drives are very good for storing back ups and system images but if you always leave them plugged in you might just want to add another internal hard drive for this since the SATA connection is more direct and much faster than USB2.0 (nearly the same as USB3.0 though).

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.



#1
June 18, 2015 at 12:13:38
I assume your computer is OEM (HP, Dell, Sony, etc) that came with Windows 7 preinstalled. On such computers you are allowed to create recovery discs only once. Alternatively, Windows 7 has a built-in tool to create system image. The difference between OEM recovery discs and Windows 7 system image is that the former is bootable while the latter - I believe - is not. Link below has more information on creating Windows 7 system image.

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/...

i_Xp/Vista/W7User


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#2
June 19, 2015 at 19:10:23
Actually reading your answer again I did not tell you that this computer is one I put together. It has a Gigabyte GA-Z77-D3H, 16 Gigs of Memory DDR2 I believe, 2 each 500 GB Western Digital Hard Drives, a 1.8 Terabyte USB External Drive, Processor Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-2500K CPU @ 3.30GHz, 3701 Mhz, 4 Core(s), 4 Logical Processor(s), Windows 7 Pro. I have Adobe Photoshop C5 and InDesign 4 installed and use them often. I have created a Windows Repair Disk but need to create a System Image in case I need to Restore the system and programs. I have my boot drive C: partitioned to 465.54 GB. On this drive 100 MB does not have a letter for the drive but says Healthy (EFI System Partition). Do you suggest anything now that yo know more information about my system?

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#3
June 19, 2015 at 21:38:10
What problem you had with creating "restore discs"?
If you meant CD-R type discs you will need a battery of discs to create a HD-image.

Since you have a large external drive that could be the right medium to store a backup.
Win 7 has a Backup feature that allows you to create a mirror image of your hard-drive(s). This can take a very long time.

My suggestion is to first make a backup of your DATA, presumably stored in "Libraries". You could make that an INCREMENTAL backup and update it on a weekly/monthly basis.
Then make a backup of any anything else except your DATA. This should be updated if you install new applications worth keeping.

In case of Restore:
First: the non-data backup.
Second: the DATA backup.

I have tried many backup/sync programs. It all comes down to the same features with a different user interface. Now I'm using Nero Back-it-up as part of a Nero 11 suite which I hardly use today since I stopped using CD's all together.


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Related Solutions

#4
June 20, 2015 at 05:34:13
✔ Best Answer
Windows Backup allows you to make a back up of your personal files and settings.
Windows Backup allows you to make an image of a partition or an entire drive.
Windows Repair Disk is bootable and has the tools to reimage a drive from a stored image made from Windows Backup.
I am not sure how your system is set up but I recommend at least two partitions, one for Windows and your programs and one for your data. This way you can more easily define your back up and much more easily (and faster) make the important image of your C drive with your operating system and programs. Doing it this way you have a two step process if catastrophe happens and you need to replace the hard drive or wipe it and start over. The process would be to delete the partition (using the Windows 7 install disk) or replace the drive, pop in the Repair Disk and reload the disk image. Then if needed, recover your back up, run Windows Update, and you are done.
Other programs are not needed but there are a few that also can do this, just make sure that you have or create their recovery disks as well if you go this route.
External hard drives are very good for storing back ups and system images but if you always leave them plugged in you might just want to add another internal hard drive for this since the SATA connection is more direct and much faster than USB2.0 (nearly the same as USB3.0 though).

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#5
June 25, 2015 at 02:54:48
Opening System Image Backup in Windows 7
Click on Start go to Getting Started and then select Back up your files.
Next click on the Create a system image hyperlink.

Creating a System Image Backup in Windows 7
Decide where you want to save the image. You can choose an external drive, burn to multiple DVD’s, or store it on a network location.

You can include other drives if you want as well but remember that will add to the size of the final image.

After the process is complete you get the option to create a system repair disc which you should do and make sure to save it in a secure location.

When it comes time to restore the image, you will be able to use the System Recovery Options to get the system back.

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/tut...


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