how to change the suffix from tmp to jpeg

January 7, 2019 at 06:45:29
Specs: Windows 7
how to change the suffix from tmp to jpeg


"Try changing the suffix from .tmp to .jpg. If there are lots to do then you can change them all in bulk by using a simple command line from the command prompt - post back if you need info on this."


See More: how to change the suffix from tmp to jpeg

Report •

#1
January 7, 2019 at 07:05:54
are you responding to this?
https://www.computing.net/answers/w...

anyways, click on the file, then hit F2 (or slowly double click the file) and change the extention from .tmp to .jpeg

i5-6600K[delid]@4.7GHz/@1.392v LLC=6 | 2x4GB Crucial-DDR4-2400CL17@14-15-15-28 1T 3000MHz@1.4v | MSI Armor RX 570 4GB@1410Mhz core@1.2v/1920MHz


Report •

#2
January 7, 2019 at 07:31:12
Or... Open the file in a program like Paint and do a save as and change the file extension there when saving it. This is safe because you still have the original if something goes wrong.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.

message edited by Fingers


Report •

#3
January 7, 2019 at 12:19:33
What was wrong with the first suggestion given on there?

ren *.tmp *.jpg

Note the dot before each file extension.

This can be a batch file put in the folder containing the files you wish to change.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
January 7, 2019 at 14:28:55
How do you know your .TMP files are pictures?

Make sure the file extensions are turned on. Open Control Panel > Folder Options > View tab > uncheck the box next to "hide extensions for known file types", then click Apply. This will make the files easier to identify. Then just right click on the TMP file, select Rename, remove TMP & replace it with JPG. When asked "are you sure?", select YES.


Report •

#5
January 8, 2019 at 01:32:35
Fingers’ suggestion ensures the “original” files wth the .tmp suffix are not lost.

One could dupIicate the files first, and use the duplicates when changing the suffix.

That again ensures the original files are still “safe” in event of “trubble at mill” during the renaming process.


Report •

Ask Question