How do I view oa corrupted photo?

September 14, 2013 at 09:25:56
Specs: Windows 7
I'm attempting the art of data bending. I have a hex editor and I've made small changes to some files, now my problem is I can't view my photo on any of the photo viewers Windows 7 have so graciously given me.
What viewing software would you recommend I use? Extra points if I can use that software for videos
Note, the files are .bak

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#1
September 14, 2013 at 16:38:24
Photos do not have a .bak extension (jpg is most common). The bak extension is for backup files.

What was the extension of the photo files you were working on before you made the changes? If you were not working on photo files originally let us know a bit more about the files you were working on?

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#2
September 14, 2013 at 21:24:02
I've mostly been editing jpegs

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#3
September 15, 2013 at 03:25:24
This is saying the extremely obvious, but... If the viewer is simply
not recognizing the file format because of the changed extension,
change the extension back again, while changing the filename or
moving the file to a different folder so that you don't overwite the
original file.

Sometimes when a file has an incorrect extension, IrfanView will
be able to tell you what the correct extension is. IrfanView might
also be a good bet to try to view files that you've messed with
and corrupted. It is a free download. I'll let you Google it.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

message edited by Jeff Root


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Related Solutions

#4
September 15, 2013 at 12:02:38
How did what you were doing manage to change the file extensions to bak?

Doing a hex job on them should not have altered the file extension. If the hex job was correct then they shouldn't need a special viewer to display them.

I agree that IrfanView has sometimes been able to make sense of corrupted files (allowing you to save them again so that they work once more). Somehow I don't fancy your chances so much with this in view of what you have been doing.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#5
September 15, 2013 at 14:12:00
I expect that the program he used to alter the images added " .bak "
to the original filename or replaced the extension with " .bak ", then
saved the altered version with the original name. That is exactly what
my hex editor does. Adding or replacing is a configuration option.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#6
September 15, 2013 at 14:17:30
Jeff, yep, that makes sense - thx.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#7
September 15, 2013 at 14:19:24
I just recalled that a few years ago, I sometimes edited image
files to add a hidden signature to an unused part of the file, such
as an unused part of the color palette, if the image had one.
On some images I could remove a large block of zeros from
the file and it still displayed normally.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

message edited by Jeff Root


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