Solved How can I fix my windows 7 hp 2000?deleted system restore pt

July 1, 2017 at 03:12:30
Specs: Windows 7 Home Premium, 4.0GB
I was an idiot who had downloaded Old School Runescape onto my hp 2000 windows 7. It worked at first, then suddenly my computer froze i couldn't click out of anything so I held the power button in. After that I turned the computer back on and it sent me to the repair option screen. I clicked repair, but stupidly lost patience when it didn't repair right away, so in my idiocy I canceled the repair and ever since that day my computer wont boot up. I can only get on my computer through safe mode as I am right now with the network option. Ive been trying to repair my laptop since about 6pm yesterday and haven't slept... it still is broken and now i seem to have deleted my sytem restore point somehow. so i can't even do the reset... Please tell me someone has a solution because I am losing sleep and my sanity from this debacle...

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✔ Best Answer
July 1, 2017 at 08:11:54
Just to clarify the suggested options above; particularly with regard to repair installations…

Ideally you will have made the suggested recovery disk set; which almost all manufacturers advise to make when first you get the computer. Sadly very few pholks bother to make them.

Some systems have a recovery partition (usually hidden) on the hard drive; and this can invoked/used via whatever routine the manufacturer advises - check with the manual for whichever computer...

The problem (as advised already) is that there is either a risk of data loss in any repair process to rebuild the system, or actual data loss if one uses the reset/recovery (restore) to factory gate state (as delivered) option.

You can boot to safe-mode. Presumably you have a cd/dvd burner programme on your laptop? If so then it ought to be available/useable even in safe-mode. If it is... use it to burn "all" your personal/important" files to dvd at least. Check the copies too to ensure they are OK. Ideally copy them to an external hard drive too - if not only. External drives are not very expensive these days; Amazon, Egghead etc. have assorted makes for around $50? Get one with it's own case/housing, and simply connect it to your laptop and copy/burn data to dvd at least.

Using any bootable version of Linux on dvd is the other way to access your entire hard drive, and again copy data to external storage.

ubuntu.com is one source of a free download for the ISO of Linux - the ubuntu variant; which burn to a dvd and then boot your laptop with that dvd. Once it';s loaded itself into RAM only, you can locate via the windows style desktop your hard drive; and then copy data to external storage.

Puppy linux is another: http://puppylinux.com which is well recommended here by those who are familiar with and/or use it.

Regardless of assurances based around whichever approach one takes to recover a working system, there is "always" a risk to data in that process. Which is why pholks above are advising you to copy/duplicate it off the system first.

“If”… you have access to full win-7 dvd you can do a repair installation – which usually won’t cause data loss; but again take precautions re’ data/personal files as advised the pholks above. That win-7dvd must be the same type as your installation; 32bit or 64bit. Also it must be a retail version – if your version is retail; or OEM if yours is an OEM installation – which very likely it is.

sluc (#1) has given you a link to M$ downloads for it. You can use “your” key with the download – as long as the key and the download are the same type; i.e. a retail key and download, or an OEM key and download. You can’t mix ‘n match them.

This somewhat convoluted “how to” may also be of interest; as it details assorted options; and way down – how to re-install win-7 and not lose data (hopefully…). They refer to it as non-destructive installation – which s pretty fair description (if things go well).

https://www.winhelp.us/non-destruct...

and this is the M$ “how to” to the same end:

http://tinyurl.com/y9d7qkqq

(I’ve used tiny url version of that site-link, as the link is otherwise “rather lengthy.)

Have a read of both the above; and likely the M$ one is the one to follow as it’s basic and to the point. However steps in the winhelp content may also allow you way to regain the system – without the need to run the repair installation?

Once you have working laptop again – make the suggested recovery disk set; and keep it safe. Ideally make an image of the hard drive too; label the dvds, and keep safe. (Acronis or Easus are the two most popular imaging software packages frequently suggested here.) An image set (ideally updated at intervals) allows one to simply replace a damaged installation with an image from an earlier time. But again ensure your data is safely duplicated off the hard drive too – at all times! And for important stuff – usually photos… - make dvd copies too. And regularly check your external copies of personal files, and update as needs-be.



#1
July 1, 2017 at 03:32:11
If you have win 7 DVD, boot from the DVD and run the startup and recovery tools.
https://support.microsoft.com/en-us...

In case you need to download the win 7 ISO:
https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/sof...

message edited by sluc


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#2
July 1, 2017 at 05:03:28
First you should have more than one restore point so unless you turned off system restore (or recently turned it off and created one restore point) you may still have some in there.
You can use a Windows 7 Repair Disk to do a Start Up Repair, a System Restore from outside the damaged operating system, and if you have a System Image made from Windows Back Up, you can restore the image back to the hard drive as it was exactly on the day the image was made and then load the most recent back up and you are in business. If you did not make a Windows 7 repair disk previously, you can make one on any Windows 7 machine as long as both machines are either 32bit or 64bit and use that.
On System Restore remember to check off "Show More Restore Points" to see all possible restore points.
If all of these fail or are for some reason not possible, you should be able to do a "Repair Install" from the Install disk referred to in reply #1 but if you do not have a good back up of your important files, use a Live Linux Disk FIRST to copy all of those files you would be upset if they were lost and put them on an external drive.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#3
July 1, 2017 at 06:23:28
I think you're confusing System Restore with Factory Restore. One is a Windows feature, the other is an HP feature. Your mistake was cancelling out of the repair. If you do the Factory Restore, you will likely lose all your files & added programs. Since you said you can get into Safe Mode, I suggest you copy off all your important files before attempting the Restore. According to HP, this is how it's done:

To set your PC/laptop to factory settings, restart the PC/laptop. At the HP welcome screen hit repeatly the F11 key (or Esc key) to launch the recovery process. Follow the instructions provided on the screen.


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#4
July 1, 2017 at 08:11:54
✔ Best Answer
Just to clarify the suggested options above; particularly with regard to repair installations…

Ideally you will have made the suggested recovery disk set; which almost all manufacturers advise to make when first you get the computer. Sadly very few pholks bother to make them.

Some systems have a recovery partition (usually hidden) on the hard drive; and this can invoked/used via whatever routine the manufacturer advises - check with the manual for whichever computer...

The problem (as advised already) is that there is either a risk of data loss in any repair process to rebuild the system, or actual data loss if one uses the reset/recovery (restore) to factory gate state (as delivered) option.

You can boot to safe-mode. Presumably you have a cd/dvd burner programme on your laptop? If so then it ought to be available/useable even in safe-mode. If it is... use it to burn "all" your personal/important" files to dvd at least. Check the copies too to ensure they are OK. Ideally copy them to an external hard drive too - if not only. External drives are not very expensive these days; Amazon, Egghead etc. have assorted makes for around $50? Get one with it's own case/housing, and simply connect it to your laptop and copy/burn data to dvd at least.

Using any bootable version of Linux on dvd is the other way to access your entire hard drive, and again copy data to external storage.

ubuntu.com is one source of a free download for the ISO of Linux - the ubuntu variant; which burn to a dvd and then boot your laptop with that dvd. Once it';s loaded itself into RAM only, you can locate via the windows style desktop your hard drive; and then copy data to external storage.

Puppy linux is another: http://puppylinux.com which is well recommended here by those who are familiar with and/or use it.

Regardless of assurances based around whichever approach one takes to recover a working system, there is "always" a risk to data in that process. Which is why pholks above are advising you to copy/duplicate it off the system first.

“If”… you have access to full win-7 dvd you can do a repair installation – which usually won’t cause data loss; but again take precautions re’ data/personal files as advised the pholks above. That win-7dvd must be the same type as your installation; 32bit or 64bit. Also it must be a retail version – if your version is retail; or OEM if yours is an OEM installation – which very likely it is.

sluc (#1) has given you a link to M$ downloads for it. You can use “your” key with the download – as long as the key and the download are the same type; i.e. a retail key and download, or an OEM key and download. You can’t mix ‘n match them.

This somewhat convoluted “how to” may also be of interest; as it details assorted options; and way down – how to re-install win-7 and not lose data (hopefully…). They refer to it as non-destructive installation – which s pretty fair description (if things go well).

https://www.winhelp.us/non-destruct...

and this is the M$ “how to” to the same end:

http://tinyurl.com/y9d7qkqq

(I’ve used tiny url version of that site-link, as the link is otherwise “rather lengthy.)

Have a read of both the above; and likely the M$ one is the one to follow as it’s basic and to the point. However steps in the winhelp content may also allow you way to regain the system – without the need to run the repair installation?

Once you have working laptop again – make the suggested recovery disk set; and keep it safe. Ideally make an image of the hard drive too; label the dvds, and keep safe. (Acronis or Easus are the two most popular imaging software packages frequently suggested here.) An image set (ideally updated at intervals) allows one to simply replace a damaged installation with an image from an earlier time. But again ensure your data is safely duplicated off the hard drive too – at all times! And for important stuff – usually photos… - make dvd copies too. And regularly check your external copies of personal files, and update as needs-be.


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