Fix MBR in Windows 7?

April 9, 2013 at 01:26:53
Specs: 7, Dual Core/8 gigs
So I quad booted my netbook with Two versions of Linux, XP and 7. I originally installed XP, then 7, and when 7 installed, it recognized XP and 7's boot manager took into account both OSes. Then I installed the Linux OSes, and Grub took over. It gave me the option of either Linux OSes, or 7. Then when I chose 7, 7's boot loader comes on giving me the option of 7 or "Earlier Versions of Windows".

Well, I had to re-install XP. Now the computer boots straight to XP without any consideration for any other OSes. And when I repaired grub, it won't give me the option of 7 anymore. I cannot seem to be able to get XP to see 7. So now my Grub shows both Linux OSes, and XP. When I go into XP, it doesn't give me the option to choose XP or 7. It just boots into XP.

I know the easy way out is to re-install 7, then fix Grub, but I don't partition my drive into 4 parts and install 4 OSes because I like to do things the easy way!

Old stuff that still works, somewhat....


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#1
April 9, 2013 at 03:46:14
You answered your own question. The latest version of Windows wants to be first.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#2
April 9, 2013 at 05:46:41
Boot off of your Win7 disk, go for the repair options. Open a command prompt and run: bootrec

You'll need to follow up and reinstall GRUB afterwards.

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#3
April 9, 2013 at 22:01:40
"You answered your own question. The latest version of Windows wants to be first."

Wow! Did you really say that? Thanks "Guapo"

Anyway, Razor, I did try repair the 7 boot loader by booting off the 7 part of the Multiboot usb, but wasn't successful. After the repair, it booted straight into XP.

Old stuff that still works, somewhat....


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#4
April 10, 2013 at 03:54:01
Did you try /FixMbr, /FixBoot and /RebuildBcd?

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#5
April 10, 2013 at 14:11:08
You installed xp and win7 all in the same partition? you can try to enter the command prompt of the recovery console or anything that can insist you to boot, and type the following commands to give it a try:
bootrec /fixmbr
bootsect /nt60 sys /mbr
bcdboot c:\windows /s c:

Or, I use EasyBCD to configure my boot options while using multiple OS.


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#6
April 10, 2013 at 19:11:19
Ok, first, like I said I patitioned my drive into four parts. I used a 500 gig, and partitioned it like this:
First 200 XP
Second 200 7
Third 50 Ubuntu 12.10
Fourth 50 Mint 12 Cinnamon

Second, I went into the 7 start up repair hoping that would fix it. But no. It now boots into 7, but not 7's boot loader with the option for XP.

I was thinking about going the BCD route, but was hoping I could not use an add on program, and get it back to where it was when first installed.

Old stuff that still works, somewhat....


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#7
April 11, 2013 at 00:35:32
If you used a 500 gig hdd, then you should have 200 gig for XP, 200 gig for 7, 50 gig for Ubuntu and 15.6 gig for Mint ( not 50 gig ) because 500 gig is eq to 465.6 actual gig. Am I correct ? ( just out of curiosity )

CoolGuy


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#8
April 11, 2013 at 01:44:49
Since no one here knows how to help me out, and I get answers from people who don't read what I wrote, I just decided to reinstall 7.

Thank you everyone for your helpful input. What a sad forum this has become.

Old stuff that still works, somewhat....


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#9
April 11, 2013 at 05:00:52
Yeah, I'm not entirely sure what you were doing wrong. When WinXP overwrote my Win7 boot loader, bootrec replaced ntldr, noticed my WinXP install, had both in the menu, and generally made sure everything was okay.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


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#10
April 11, 2013 at 07:06:33
If I want to install several OSes ( let's say four: XP, Win 7, Ubuntu and Mint ) on the same computer, I take this route: I install four hard disks. I install the first hard disk and install XP on it. Then I disconnect it. I install the second hard disk and install Win 7 on it. Then I disconnect it, too. I install the third hard disk. I install Ubuntu on it. Then I disconnect it, too. I install the fourth hard disk. I install Mint on it. Then I connect all hard disks at the same time.

With this method, I do not have to deal with boot managers. BIOS takes care of everything.

In this case, default OS is selected in BIOS. If you select the hard disk on which Ubuntu is installed in BIOS as the first disk, then Ubuntu starts when you power on your computer. You can select any hard disk in BIOS as the first boot device. Then whatever OS is on it becomes the default OS.

If you want to start another OS when you power on your computer, then you press an F key when BIOS post screen appears. My Asus M/B requires F8 key to bring about the first boot device menu. Then I choose which OS I want to boot to.

In BIOS, OSes are not mentioned but hard disk names are mentioned. You know which hard disk has what OS on it.

I have OCZ Colossus SSD ( Win 7 ), Corsair Force T SSD ( Win 8 ) and Seagate ( Data only ). I chose OCZ Colossus as the first boot device and Windows 7 is the default OS in my computer.

This all procedure works with SATA M/B.

Am I clear and helpful enough ?

CoolGuy


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#11
April 11, 2013 at 19:04:42
I don't think reinstall win7 is gonna help, any individual OS here is intact, you just have to rebuild the multiboot menu, am I right?

This is what I would do to avoid any reinstallation:
1. EasyBCD, it's easy to use.
2. Ubuntu has a GRUB editor that you can have a try, but it is a little bit more difficult than EasyBCD.


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#12
April 18, 2013 at 23:01:48
The program you need to fix this is on the Windows 7/vista installation DVD, inside the folder "Boot", it's a command line program called "bootsect.exe". It fixes either windows xp or windows vista/7 bootsectors. The command would be "bootsect nt60 C:" to fix a windows 7/vista (nt60) bootsector. Windows xp would be nt52. You don't have to change anything else, all the other requirements for booting are independant, that is, if you restore the nt60 boot sector, it will boot the BOOTMGR, not the NTLDR, both are still present, the bootsector determines which will be booted.

Put in the windows 7 installation dvd, and open a command prompt by either typing CMD into the "run" box in your start menu, or clicking on Windows/system32/cmd.exe. Now type the following into the command prompt, substituting "X:" for the letter of your dvd drive:
X:\boot\bootsect nt60 C:
and reboot your computer, it will boot window 7, instead of windows xp.

I'm a toxic agent, on a dangerous mission so secret, that even I don't know what it is, because if I did, I would have to kill myself.


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