Solved double version windows 7 and failed updates

Custom / CUSTOM
January 3, 2014 at 00:37:22
Specs: Windows 7, IntelQuadcore 2.8 GHz
Because of regular BSODs decided to install from scratch another Windows 7 version on another HDD. Now I get a start menu with the two versions. Can I just format the partition on the other HDD to get rid of it ?

Have been updating the new windows 7 version but found that many updates FAILED. What is there to be done to get them properly installed ?


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✔ Best Answer
January 5, 2014 at 09:35:03
You say you have two installations of win-7; one on the original HD and the other on a second HD. Presumably (a) this is desktop system; (b) the second drive is slave to the first (if using the olde style Master-Slave arrangement; if using Cable Select… then much effect the same overall…)?

Presuming the olde HD is that actual boot HD - and as you say it has the mbr on it…

Can you clearly identify which version (as in which partition on which drive) you are booting to now; and which one is the original installation?

And which one are you considering reformatting (just to be clear here)?

If you reformat the original HD and it is the one that boots up (has the mbr etc.) then yes; if you reformat it you will lose the mbr and all the other start-up/boot-files for the OS remaining on the second drive. And thus no OS to boot… You would have to run a repair routine to re-establish the mbr etc...

If you have the second installation already working (well…?) on the second drive as a "slave" to the olde drive, you "could" simply set it as default OS to boot. Check it does so OK. Then delete (via windows explorer) the entire windows folder etc. for the original installation. But do NOT delete the start-up files etc. on the olde drive… check the second installation is still OK when booted up again; and if so - empty the recycle-bin; defrag the olde drive… Then use as data storage?

Or you can simply try the full repair installation routine on the original/olde drive. In effect you overwrite that olde(r) installation.

(You will still have a dual-boot as now; one one each drive.)

There are various detailed how to do it all "out there" (Skully) and these are but three of them:

http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorial...

http://www.pcworld.com/article/2431...

http://pcsupport.about.com/od/tools...

Having the active/working (only) OS etc. on a slaved/second drive isn't new; but it's not the best way to go…? Would be much better/wise to follow the suggestions above by others - to either do a repair installation as immediately above; or having deleted the original on the olde drive, simply re-install afresh. During the re-installation it may likely "offer" to repair a current installation.. Decline it and proceed with fresh/new one to the original drive. Afterwards - however you dun it - it will still very likely give you a dual-boot as now…

If you reformat the olde® - although you will lose the mbr etc… it will all be restored/rebuilt etc. when you install Win-7 as a clean installation to the olde drive.

Incidentally if you're still getting BSODs… and they are just that…? You may have other issues impinging here. Typically RAM… - it may be duff/faulty; it may simply require a little cleaning on its contacts… (power down fully - no volts anywhere inside the system at all). Remove RAM modules; cleans contacts with soft eraser (type used on/for pencils) - nothing abrasive. Replace modules and remove again; replace - and do it a couple of times - so as to clean board/slot contacts a little too… (things can oxidise over time…) That last part -remove/replace a couple of times - being a recent addition (by Derek) to that well used tip.

message edited by trvlr



#1
January 3, 2014 at 01:33:40
Be careful about just erasing the first partition. This will probably lead to an unbootable system as the boot files are stored there. Your best bet is to start over and install Windows 7 from scratch on the first partition, overwriting the original install. To avoid possible problems with double menu entries, disconnect the second hard disk whilst you do that. You can later connect it and format it if you need it for storage space.

As for the problems with Windows Update, there are a host of potential reasons. You need to look at the error codes produced. Google these along with "Windows Update" and you should find help. If not, post the codes here and someone may be able to help. But without the error codes there are too many variables.


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#2
January 3, 2014 at 08:38:53
I also would recommend reinstalling again, just make sure you delete the original partition (custom install) and create a new partition and format it during the install. This will ensure that you are not cluttering things up with an "Old Windows" file or other problems. It will also ensure that if you had a root infection that was causing your issues, they will be gone as well.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#3
January 5, 2014 at 07:09:48
Thank you for all the wellcome answers. However, I have one other question before I start again on a full install and everything that goes with it. If I format the partition on which the "old" Win7 is found and that is the partition where the MBR was, is it not possible to use the installation DVD of Win7 and use "startup repair" ?

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#4
January 5, 2014 at 09:35:03
✔ Best Answer
You say you have two installations of win-7; one on the original HD and the other on a second HD. Presumably (a) this is desktop system; (b) the second drive is slave to the first (if using the olde style Master-Slave arrangement; if using Cable Select… then much effect the same overall…)?

Presuming the olde HD is that actual boot HD - and as you say it has the mbr on it…

Can you clearly identify which version (as in which partition on which drive) you are booting to now; and which one is the original installation?

And which one are you considering reformatting (just to be clear here)?

If you reformat the original HD and it is the one that boots up (has the mbr etc.) then yes; if you reformat it you will lose the mbr and all the other start-up/boot-files for the OS remaining on the second drive. And thus no OS to boot… You would have to run a repair routine to re-establish the mbr etc...

If you have the second installation already working (well…?) on the second drive as a "slave" to the olde drive, you "could" simply set it as default OS to boot. Check it does so OK. Then delete (via windows explorer) the entire windows folder etc. for the original installation. But do NOT delete the start-up files etc. on the olde drive… check the second installation is still OK when booted up again; and if so - empty the recycle-bin; defrag the olde drive… Then use as data storage?

Or you can simply try the full repair installation routine on the original/olde drive. In effect you overwrite that olde(r) installation.

(You will still have a dual-boot as now; one one each drive.)

There are various detailed how to do it all "out there" (Skully) and these are but three of them:

http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorial...

http://www.pcworld.com/article/2431...

http://pcsupport.about.com/od/tools...

Having the active/working (only) OS etc. on a slaved/second drive isn't new; but it's not the best way to go…? Would be much better/wise to follow the suggestions above by others - to either do a repair installation as immediately above; or having deleted the original on the olde drive, simply re-install afresh. During the re-installation it may likely "offer" to repair a current installation.. Decline it and proceed with fresh/new one to the original drive. Afterwards - however you dun it - it will still very likely give you a dual-boot as now…

If you reformat the olde® - although you will lose the mbr etc… it will all be restored/rebuilt etc. when you install Win-7 as a clean installation to the olde drive.

Incidentally if you're still getting BSODs… and they are just that…? You may have other issues impinging here. Typically RAM… - it may be duff/faulty; it may simply require a little cleaning on its contacts… (power down fully - no volts anywhere inside the system at all). Remove RAM modules; cleans contacts with soft eraser (type used on/for pencils) - nothing abrasive. Replace modules and remove again; replace - and do it a couple of times - so as to clean board/slot contacts a little too… (things can oxidise over time…) That last part -remove/replace a couple of times - being a recent addition (by Derek) to that well used tip.

message edited by trvlr


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