Descriptions of Windows 7 X64 Updates

March 10, 2015 at 22:31:03
Specs: Win 7
I have Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit with SP-1. No other updates.

Where can I get a list of all the updates Microsoft would try to push at me
if I told it to update my system, with descriptions of what they are?

About how many would there be, and what would be the total size?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


See More: Descriptions of Windows 7 X64 Updates

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#1
March 11, 2015 at 02:37:35
How many there would be that are applicable to you depends on what Microsoft applications you've got installed on your system.

Click the Windows orb at bottom-left.
Click All Programs then click on Windows Update
Click on "Check for updates".

message edited by phil22


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#2
March 11, 2015 at 03:20:51

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#3
March 11, 2015 at 04:18:20
You can Google any of the KB******* numbers and find out what they are for.

Generally speaking I do not download or install drivers from Microsoft but do accept critical updates and many others too.


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#4
March 11, 2015 at 08:37:04
XpUser,

Near the top of that page are four notes. The second is:

> Note 2: These are not available in Windows Update.

Does that mean it is a list of optional performance updates in
addition to the updates that Windows Update provides? Or what?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#5
March 11, 2015 at 09:25:35
Whoever changed the title of the thread,

I now have to guess what the thread title means.

What are "Post Windows Updates" ?

Did you mean "Post-SP1 Updates" ?

The title was clear and meaningful as I had it. Not now.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#6
March 11, 2015 at 10:55:27
I am a moderator on this forum but I didn't change the title. I can change it back if you state what you want it to say.

That said, the title makes sense to me because that is what Microsoft calls all updates released AFTER SP1.


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#7
March 11, 2015 at 12:36:55
Microsoft calls all updates released after SP1 "Post Windows Updates" ???

I'm pretty sure I've never seen that anywhere. In addition, it doesn't make sense.
Although making sense isn't a requirement for most terminology, of course.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#8
March 11, 2015 at 12:47:52
Re #4
That is because the list is not one of every Windows Update. It is a list of hotfixes that have been produced for problems with particular computers. In some cases you might have to pay for them.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#9
March 11, 2015 at 12:52:53
Jeff, MS calls them Post SP1 updates. That is to let you know that you don't need to install every update ever released if you install SP1. Then just get the Post SP1 updates.

Anyway, as I stated above, if you want the tag line changed then post what you want. When I came upon this thread it was as it currently is titled.


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#10
March 11, 2015 at 14:15:09
Derek,

Thanks for the explanation. I've skimmed through maybe 2/3 of
the list so far (including the KB articles as needed), and it wasn't
clear that any of the hotfixes are relevant to my computer.

OtheHill,

The "Windows 7 SP1 X64 Post" was added into my original title.
Specifying that it is Windows 7 seems reasonable. The
rest is confusing or misleading.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#11
March 11, 2015 at 20:37:25
I generally recommend setting Windows Update to scan for important updates and to notify you when those updates are available. This way you can look at them and install them when it is convenient to you. For those who are not computer literate then the helper should set the updates to be completely automatic. For those who are always on top of their computer maintenance you can opt for the completely manual way but you should scan for updates about weekly and keep up with installing all security and important updates. These updates include security patches, patches to major issues, and malicious software removal. If your computer only has SP1 like it was just installed or rolled back to a disk image then you may have a hundred or more updates that are all important and it will probably need to restart the machine 2 or 3 times before it is complete and if you then manually ran update again, if will probably find many more after scanning again and these will be equally important.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#12
March 12, 2015 at 05:58:53
I used Windows Update to get the list of updates it thinks my
system needs. It reports 124 important updates and 55 optional
updates are available. The first one in the list is stressed as a fix
to a critical vulnerability, but after researching it, I find that I had
already disabled the vulnerable Active-X control because I don't
need it and it just *looked* particularly dangerous to me. Ha!

The second update, "Cumulative Security Update for Internet
Explorer ..." contains 19 fixes, all but one of which appear to be
irrelevant. The one possibly relevant fix is for "Table content on
a webpage is displayed slowly in Internet Explorer".

The third update is IE 11. Maybe later.

The next 14 updates are all for .NET Framework, which I had
already disabled as unneeded and potentially dangerous.

Can updates be downloaded and installed later? It is my policy
to never install anything while connected to the Internet.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#13
March 12, 2015 at 07:18:46
Jeff, I think you are over thinking this. Microsoft occasionally will release an update that causes problems for some or all users. I do the same as Fingers and get the notifications but not install them until I review. I don't install until later in the week in case there may be an issue with one of the updates.

That said, I usually accept all critical and pick and choose the remainder.

I don't think Microsoft would send you an update if you didn't need it after analyzing your system. I personally trust Microsoft with the downloads. After all, these are the same folks that produced the OS you are using.

Is the title more to your liking?


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#14
March 12, 2015 at 08:17:35
MS have had a run of dubious updates in recent times but nothing that has caused any real grief. Any dodgy update can be uninstalled or you can wait for MS to fix it, which they usually do eventually.

Although you have not mentioned security updates in particular, to not get those imposes more risk than the updates.

I do mull over optional updates and generally avoid anything to do with drivers unless I have a darned good reason to get them. I prefer to go to the manufacturers for these.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#15
March 12, 2015 at 11:10:14
OtheHill,

The descriptions on almost all of the updates I've looked at so far
clearly indicate that they involve parts of Windows I've turned off.
Windows Update wouldn't check to see whether the functions it
has updates for are enabled or disabled, since I might re-enable
a function at any time. It can't know which functions I plan to use,
so it will probably try to push every update it has for Windows 7
Home Premium at my computer.

Derek,

All but 13 of the 124 "important updates" were labeled Security
Updates. I expect that the other 13 are all security-related, too.
The third update listed is IE 11, as I said. The others are at the
bottom of the list, and include SP1 and Windows Malicious
Software Removal Tool.

I've only examined the first few closely enough yet to determine
whether they are relevant. But I can see right off that the 15 marked
as dealing with .NET Framework don't apply to my current setup.

If I install IE 11 then I'll probably download and install what appear
to be a mass of fixes for problems with it.

I haven't tried to view the list of 55 optional updates yet. I guess
I'll have to go back through the 10-minute-or-so Windows Update
check for new updates to get that list, since I closed the WU
window without saving it.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#16
March 12, 2015 at 12:10:28
If you use IE then it is worth getting IE11 and the associated security updates - they have a cumulative update every month or two, probably one of those you mentioned. There are also Windows system security updates, which also patch up holes (even if you don't use IE). I see no real reason not to use them.

Can't say I really have any issue with updates generally but a few months ago they seemed to bungle more than usual. Hopefully they are back on track now, if nothing else because buggy updates make bad press for MS.

If, like me, you are on manual updates you can get more information about each one from the download entries, although that info often doesn't arrive for half a day after the updates themselves. There are good arguments made for auto updates but I prefer to get them at a time when they don't interfere with anything else I am doing. Maybe I'm a control freak too, as far as computers are concerned - I have a "system for updates (mine and MS) which serves me quite well.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#17
March 12, 2015 at 14:46:44
Jeff, I am not an expert on this point but what would it hurt to install them anyway. For all you know there could still be an exploit weather you have them turned on or off.

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#18
March 12, 2015 at 20:32:49
I asked:

> Can updates be downloaded and installed later?

Now I notice that one of the options is "Download updates
but let me choose whether to install them", so it looks like the
answer is "Yes".

I said:

> I can see right off that the 15 marked as dealing with .NET
> Framework don't apply to my current setup.

But some of the descriptions are extremely confusing and
seem self-contradictory about what the update updates.

And I said:

> I haven't tried to view the list of 55 optional updates yet. I guess
> I'll have to go back through the 10-minute-or-so Windows Update
> check for new updates to get that list, since I closed the WU
> window without saving it.

Now I see that Windows Update stores all that info and makes it
readily available at any time.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#19
March 12, 2015 at 20:54:35
Most experts I have come across have written in favor of getting all important updates and reviewing the others for possible ones you may want. How you get your updates depends on how much control you like and how responsible you are in checking them regularly. Not getting updates and leaving yourself open to security issues is more dangerous than a possible error or glitch in an update.
http://www.overclock.net/t/1156654/...
Step 8 (optimizations after set up):
"Run Windows Update: Applies to SSDs/HDDs
Make sure every update is installed. It may take a few restarts. This will make sure your system has no vulnerabilities and will most likely solve any issues may encounter due to the updates not being installed. You can do this step later if you like, I just like to do it at this point myself."

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#20
March 13, 2015 at 02:48:00
WSUS came to mind reading this thread but there are more options available in regards to offline installation methods. Here's a blog:

https://www.raymond.cc/blog/offline...

As far as determining which updates are beneficial to your setup the descriptions can tend to be obscure at best. Researching the KB # then downloading seems to be the only sure fire way.


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