Corrupt Files After SFC, Again

Double power / Em63k
July 9, 2014 at 16:02:40
Specs: Win 7, SP1, AMD 4130 FX+ 8/12 RAM
After years of trouble with my computer, I finally purchased a new AMD computer. But shortly after I got it I started having random errors, from programs not launching from their shortcuts (though the properties sheets looked fully normal), to losing the functionality of the Control Panel, to losing the ability to print. These were exactly the same problems that afflicted my old computer; every antivirus, antimalware, and rootkit program has come back with a clean scan result save for one (TDSSKiller; the program it found {360Amigo} has been eradicated from all my computers).

I have tried both a Repair Install using a Windows DVD through Windows Explorer, and a full install from scratch (though I was never given the opportunity to reformat the C:\ drive, which is a hybrid SSD drive). After the OS was reinstalled, I started loading programs back in, and by the time I was finished the sporadic program and system errors started to show up again. A repeat of SFC again came back with corrupted files, unable to fix them.

I don't know either the cause or the fix to 'found corrupt files that can't be fixed', and would appreciate your help in dealing with the problem.

Regards,
BearPup


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#1
July 9, 2014 at 19:51:36
Faulty hard drive, ram module doesn't like the way it is seated? I would shut of the computer, pop out the ram modules and snap them right back in making sure they are locked in good. If windows will load, go to the search box and start typing memory diagnostic, and you should see it pop up as an option, click on it, select the option to restart the computer and test the memory, see what that does. Faulty/poorly seated ram modules, can cause corruption, faulty hard drive or viruses.

To err is human but to really screw things up, you need a computer!


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#2
July 9, 2014 at 20:22:23
Thanks for responding. Though I had previously checked the memory, again all came back with no problems detected. There are no viruses or malware detected, and once again I've reinstalled the OS, this time, finally from the point of formatting the hard drive. And now I add back only the essential programs - mainly security apps and offline programs.....

And still in the dark as to what is causing these OSes to 'go south'.


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#3
July 10, 2014 at 07:04:19
If I had to make a guess, I would start with assuming it's a faulty install disk. Corrupt files constantly usually means a bad disk or bad sectors on the hard drive that can't be read. If you booted off the disk, created and formatted a new partition and did an OS install and it's faulty, what else could it be. Just seems logical.

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#4
July 10, 2014 at 09:15:53
Defective RAM can produce the effect/illusion of corrupt files - when installing etc. from a cd/dvd; and even when all appears well initially the effect/illusion can appear later.

You have already removed and reseated current modules; and problem still persists?

Have you perhaps cleaned the edge connectors on the sticks with soft pencil eraser - (and ensure no particles adhering when you re-insert/re-instal the sticks)?

What happens if you reduce to a single stick (presuming there are two or more present); and then test/install whatever? Test with each singlestick in turn.

Personally I've never had much faith in Memtest utilities; preferring to check by substitution etc. and removing all but one stick at a time (as just above)...

That this is a new system, and that you appear to have the same problems as with the olde one is a little odd - if not suspicious?

Have you re-installed any files etc. that were on the olde computer onto the new one? By that I mean - any files you may have saved from previous computer and then installed/copied to the new drive? Or does this effect arrive even when using a branded software (M$ etc.) disk? It "may" be that somehow you "do" have a pest or three and not aware of it; even though you have scanned variously... Likely your scan were from within the active OS (i.e. Windows was booted up etc...); and there a few nasties that hide once Windows is booted and thus escape detection...

So one item I would suggest you try - even at this stage, and allowing for you already having done scans various for pests...; and regardless of whether or not you have copied/transferred files from the olde system to the new.

Download and burn to a dvd a Kasperksy anti-virus rescue disk. Boot up with that dvd and let it do its thing. It will go on-line and update it self; then scan the whole system fully. The utility is Linux based; freebie; and loads itself into RAM only. Thus the hard drive is merely a resource for it to access - and scan in this case.

http://support.kaspersky.co.uk/viru...

While I have heard of mechanical drives having problems straight out of the box as it were, not heard of the same for SSD - which isn't say they can't/haven't happened...


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#5
July 10, 2014 at 11:34:47
Thanks to both of you who have responded. As far as my memory modules are concerned, I carried 2 over from the old machine to the new machine, so there was some 'substitution memory checking' and all appears normal. The growing consensus of what makes sense after all the cross-computer variables are looked at is that one (or more) programs is causing the problem.

And while I tried to carry over as few programs as possible from one computer to the next, some are inevitable; but most are fresh downloads. The other item pointing in that direction is that TDSSKiller (Kaspersky product) on its scan flagged as malware one of my most trusted programs, 360Amigo. The program is out-of-date and the company is, as far as I know, out-of-business; but it provided a valuable monitoring function on Windows boot-up.

This time on restoring my computer I installed the same core programs, except for 360Amigo. All scans so far are clean, including SFC and TDSSKiller. And I continue to load programs in sections (all imaging programs, all utilities, etc.) and launch SFC scans after each section.

I will keep people updated, and appreciate the thought that has gone into your responses[.
Regards,
BearPup


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#6
July 10, 2014 at 12:35:40
How odd a coincidence.. I was wondering if you had carried any RAM over from the olde to the new system...

If you have any of the posted issues again.. try not using any of the RAM carried over; and if you have to use any of it - then test (as above) with only any one of the sticks carried over; even if there are other (new) sticks still installed... Ideally try things with each stick (new or olde) in terms of substitution... (if that makes sense).

My feeling is that this may yet prove to be a RAM issue...; either failing (intermittently); or with the olde RAMin the new system - both that and not quite fully compatible as well.


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#7
July 10, 2014 at 13:32:47
Are the problems you describe present immediately after the OS install? Or do they appear after you have configured your PC the way you prefer it, after you have installed your software?

When you mentioned Amigo360 being no longer supported this raised a red flag. I had a look at the software online and there are many reports of this software causing system instability. Software of this nature need to be constantly updated by developers to keep up with changes and security updates made by Microsoft. Also I see it comes with registry cleaning options, have you used it to clean your registry? Registry cleaners can be bad for the system also.

While I am not a fan of PC optimisation software I can see the importance of monitoring your system for rogue startup entries and constant monitoring of which applications are requesting Internet access. Have you considered WinPatrol for system monitoring purposes? I used to use it religiously whenever I wanted to trial and review new software.

Interesting that you say Amigo360 is no longer supported. I can see on a download page the last update for the software was 7 May 2014.

message edited by btk1w1


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#8
July 10, 2014 at 13:39:01
Thank you for responding. If it yet proves to be a RAM issue then that's what it is. For now all the hardware passes every test I've thrown at it, each byte, each chip, multiple passes, multiple tests. That one misses something, rare but plausible. But each byte of each chip, done by multiple different tests, something would have to show up.

For now, the one test that failed, and did so now in two different test regimens, was a start-up 'enhancer' and guard program - nothing but nothing that wanted to get on my computer could, it would be flagged and held-up till I OK'd it - 360Amigo by name. When a second program (TDSSKiller by Kapersky) flagged 360Amigo as a danger, out it went. One caution on a trusted program is one thing, but two programs, one a warning - no. Guess it went bad over time.

If in fact it was the culprit remains to be totally proven, but I've now loaded my core programs (of which 360Amigo was an integral part), and SFC has twice come back clean. A few dozen more programs (mostly new downloads) and I'll declare victory. For now I have hope, and lots more programs to reload!

Regards,
BearPup


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#9
July 10, 2014 at 13:54:08
Ah, what download page says its updated? Maybe I have missed something??? To answer your questions: The problems seem to start sometime after I start loading programs. Its not something consistent or a 'large event'. Its ''creeping failures" to do something or not do something. Things would increasingly be off till a given threshold is reached and I know its gone south again. That's when I run SFC and get the confirmation.

I totally agree about optimizers and registry cleaners, and 360Amigo had those and more 'problematic' modules that on belief alone I would never use. I used three modules - disk cleanup aka Junk Files; memory defragging; and startup guard. Everything else was unchecked and unused.

BTW, I now use a program called Startup Guard by PrivacyRoot. It does well enough, though 360Amigo did more / better. I know of WinPatrol, and its just not my cup of tea - talk about an all-in-one program!

Regards,
BearPup


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#10
July 10, 2014 at 15:08:57
The page you requested:
http://speeditup-free.en.lo4d.com

I can't help but think maybe Amigo360 might be your culprit. It ties in with creeping changes seeing as it's nature is to monitor and prevent "unwanted / unneeded" changes. It's more a suspicion than anything and unfortunately the best way to test this theory is to do a complete reinstall of your operating system and omitting it from your software installs. It's a lot of work if it turns out not to be the problem though.

message edited by btk1w1


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#11
July 10, 2014 at 15:48:54
Yeah, its a real pain, especially as this is the umpteenth time I've done it. But its the only way to test it. So I'm reinstalling, reinstalling, and downloading to reinstall the rest!

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#12
July 10, 2014 at 16:08:46
Good luck BearPup. Hope it turns out fine for you.

If you haven't already, a consideration that you might be interested in is backup software.

I use Acronis True Image.

Some software I used toy with would create immense problems. With backup software all you have to do is reload an image and in no time you are back to where you want to be.

One big reason I am a fan of Acronis is their try and decide feature. Basically you turn on "try and decide" install software run your PC. When you have finished turn off try and decide and the option to keep the changes or revert are made to you.

message edited by btk1w1


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#13
July 10, 2014 at 16:45:41
I agree about using backup software, I use Keriver One-Click Restore Free. It basically clones the entire system drive ("C:\"), and takes only 20 minutes at max to backup the entire setup. I use it once a week, along with the backup of Internet programs via Hekasoft Backup & Restore. I'm only waiting to get a good set of data before I back it up - I certainly don't want to backup the cause of the problem, just the cure!

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#14
July 10, 2014 at 17:09:20
Lol. Most definitely.

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#15
July 10, 2014 at 19:26:41
I am pleased to announce that I have reinstalled my now slim-down system (just core programs in each section), and made a clone of it, and before and after all that the SFC program ran 100% fine - Windows integrity check found no violations of any system files. SFC finally passed with all programs installed. Except of course 360Amigo. Interestingly enough, going to the 360Amigo site gets a message from Avira, who has bought 360Amigo and plans to distribute its own version of 360Amigo. I've written to them asking them what my "status" is under the new regime.

I especially want to thank all who responded from the various forums. That support was especially appreciated.

message edited by BearPup


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#16
July 10, 2014 at 23:38:16
That's really good news. I'm glad it worked out.

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#17
July 11, 2014 at 03:08:29
Good to hear your persistence paid off. Seems that Amigo360 may not quite the "amigo" it once was?

Also thank you for the Keriver app info; added to my list of useful stuff to know about and pass on.


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#18
July 11, 2014 at 03:59:40
@btk1w1: Took a look at the lo4d page for Amigo and their screenshot doesn't look like my screen; the changes are subtle, but noticeable nonetheless. And even though the version number matches what I show as the version number, the screenshot is definitely different. It is tempting...

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#19
July 11, 2014 at 05:10:39
BearPup, as much as I wish I could offer certainty in this regard unfortunately I can't.

I'm not familiar with the software and I can't vouch for the validity of the site hosting it. I came across it while I was searching.

In your position though I would say that personally I would try it. You have a backup of your operating system running smoothly and it is obviously a highly valued program. Worst comes to worst you can simply re-image your PC with the good backup and wait for Avira to hopefully deliver the goods.

I can empathise with your dilemma. I have on a few occasions had to let go of software that I really liked.

I have to say I am intrigued by Amigo and will probably give it a shot myself at some stage.

message edited by btk1w1


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#20
July 11, 2014 at 05:57:40
What I've taken as a half-way measure is to write to Avira, which has purchased the 360Amigo software. I'll wait to see what their response is. And thanks for your support.

Regards,
BearPup


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#21
July 11, 2014 at 06:52:07
A pleasure.

Hopefully Avira respond, and respond favourably.


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