Computer shuts off after sitting a while

December 7, 2014 at 21:31:35
Specs: Windows 7
Computer shuts down unexpectedly after sitting a while, then show that it shut down incorrectly when it is rebooted, asking if it should start windows normally or in safe mode? only been doing this a few days... Help!

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#1
December 7, 2014 at 23:23:19
Could be overheating.
Take a cover off & clean out the dust, put an external fan on & see if it behaves with the extra cooling. Make sure all the fans ( including the power supply ) are spinning fast, with the power off, give them a spin with a matchstick to make sure they are not stuck.

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#2
December 7, 2014 at 23:53:51
Is the computer going into sleep mode or hibernation? Check what the "Power Options" in control panel are set to.

To err is human but to really screw things up, you need a computer!


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#3
December 8, 2014 at 02:02:11
If it's a laptop it might well be going into hibernation etc., as per #2; equally (but less likely) if a desktop/tower.

If a laptop, check "all" vents are clear, and that any/all cooling fans are functioning correctly. Similarly check fans etc. on any desktop etc.


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Related Solutions

#4
December 8, 2014 at 04:20:11
Desktop or Laptop?
Install HWMonitor and note down the internal temperatures (all). If you do it just after starting cold from sitting a while it will show you minimum, maximum, and current temps. If any of the current temps are the maximum and are climbing then you do have an overheating problem and the first step would be a thorough cleaning with a can of compressed air that you can purchase at a computer or office supply store but record the temps for posting (copy/paste, screen shot, or just write them down). Sometimes the best clue is which one(s) are hot and how fast they rise. Also note if the fan (laptop) or fans (desktop) are spinning and if they sound unusually loud because you may need to determine later if a fan is not working properly or simply being bogged down with the dust if it is not working, though clogged heat sinks and vents are more common (DO NOT remove a heat sink unless it it later determined that this will be necessary).

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#5
December 8, 2014 at 09:14:20
Just to add it is usually possible, if you are careful, to clean a CPU heat-sink through the fan blades with the help of a small brush and some canned air. You can usually get around the sides of the fan too using the same method.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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