Can't reinstall Windows 7, freezes

March 15, 2011 at 16:18:59
Specs: Windows 7, 4 Gigs
I dealt with this just a few days ago: http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...

This morning I had serious freezing issues with Windows 7. Just minutes after booting, it would freeze permanently. My mouse wouldn't even move on the screen, completely frozen.

Manually shut down. Then it would sometimes freeze at the "Asus" screen and sometimes the computer would turn on but there wouldn't be any output to the monitor.

I managed to boot and enter in Safe Mode. That didn't freeze. So I tried reinstalling Windows 7, selected Custom Installation, etc. Unpacked the files alright, went about 17% through the second step but had to restart to continue. Shortly after restarting, at about 36%, it froze again. Tried it again, froze in nearly the same spot, 37%. Started again and it tried to recover my old installation, gave me the blue screen of death "Windows stopped to prevent damage."

Now I'm back in the cycle where it either starts with no video output or starts and freezes in Windows.

What on earth do I do? I can't even format my HDD through Windows 7. Thank you for your time.

(This is a rig I built about two weeks ago.)


See More: Cant reinstall Windows 7, freezes

Report •

#1
March 15, 2011 at 16:41:53
If your not making it past POST (Perform Operation Self Test). (and for people who dont know what this is, thats that white writing stuff that appears when you turn your computer on)

You will find that this isnt a software issue but more likely a BIOS/Hardware issue.
Firstly i would try updating your BIOS, just incase.

Then i would unplug all devices not required to run the PC for example.
Remove all hard drives except the one you wish to install the OS to
Remove all extra CD Rom drive.
Remove Extra Graphics cards (if the mobo has an onboard one, remove the card and use the onboard one)
Remove extra Ram (Only use what is required to install the OS)

Sometimes its one component thats doing it. sometimes its the components interacting with each other. and sometimes its just because your PSU isnt putting out enough power to run it all


Report •

#2
March 15, 2011 at 16:52:36
I'm sometimes making it past POST, sometimes not. It goes in cycles: starts normally-> freezes on the Windows desktop after running normally for 2-3 minutes, I manually restart-> and no output. Wait a while, and the cycle starts over.

The only time my computer works without freezing is Safe Mode.

I'll try your suggestion as soon as I can. Thanks.


Report •

#3
March 15, 2011 at 16:56:51
" Firstly i would try updating your BIOS, just incase.

Then i would unplug all devices not required to run the PC for example.
Remove all hard drives except the one you wish to install the OS to
Remove all extra CD Rom drive.
Remove Extra Graphics cards (if the mobo has an onboard one, remove the card and use the onboard one)
Remove extra Ram (Only use what is required to install the OS)

Sometimes its one component thats doing it. sometimes its the components interacting with each other. and sometimes its just because your PSU isnt putting out enough power to run it all"

I love everything except the first sentence.

larry


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
March 15, 2011 at 17:00:34
Before trying to install again, I would recommend doing 2 things first that do not require an operating system installed to work. I would run Memtest (burn a bootable CD with ISO image downloaded, or if you have a floppy drive, there is a floppy version) and see if bad memory is your problem. The second thing I would recommend is download and make bootable CD of the hard drive test utility from your hard drive manufacturer to make sure your problem is not a hard drive problem. And last (I guess that's actually 3 things), I would recommend reset defaults (or if available, reset optimal settings) in BIOS to make sure memory and other components are running within spec's.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


Report •

#5
March 15, 2011 at 17:02:52
I would actually agree, updating BIOS should be done for a specific reason rather than 'just in case' since there is a small but serious risk with a BIOS update.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


Report •

#6
March 15, 2011 at 17:03:44
Thank you for all your suggestions. I will try them as soon as I can.

Report •

#7
March 15, 2011 at 22:15:29
as your system run fine for a while in the beginning, we can assume that your bios is ok for your rig.
check your heat levels in the bios?

due to the continuous problem with post issues, i would
check my memory on a friends computer running 24hr tests if possible.
download the disk utilities from the disk manufacturer and do a full format, disk and sector check,
finally check the pins in the cpu slot make sure none of them are bent or out of place, (i recently spend two days on a machine to find one of the spring pins on and intel i5 slot was bent, causing allsorts of silly issues.)
RMA the mobo,
as you already bought a new powersupply i think you can rule that out.
i assume that all your parts are still under warranty?

i hate computers!
but cant help myself....


Report •

#8
March 16, 2011 at 23:07:29
I reordered the boot priority and ran Memtest from a bootable CD, came back later to find the computer dead. Power was on, all the fans running, but no output to the monitor. Try restarting, but again no output to monitor. No Asus screen, nothing.

Safe to say at this point that it's the mobo?


Report •

#9
March 17, 2011 at 19:29:46
Ran Memtest successfully for 8 tests, nothing wrong with the RAM.

Ran Hitachi HDD checker, nothing found.

So is it the mobo or CPU?


Report •

#10
March 17, 2011 at 20:17:00
Very possibly, even more probably would be the power supply. The power supply has many outputs, if one is dead or far enough off voltage, you could still get some lights and fans, but not full functions. If you can borrow a power supply to test, that would be best. Asus may be able to give you some advice/diagnostic tests to evaluate which one is bad, and that may save you time and money. Your problems all along could have been caused by a power supply issue as well as memory or hard drive.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


Report •

#11
March 17, 2011 at 21:38:19
I still have the spare I bought for my last problem, a Corsair.

Just installed it and still having the problem.

I'm guessing it's definitely mobo or CPU. Probably should RMA both to Newegg ASAP just to be safe.


Report •

Ask Question