Can you install windows 7 on a swappable hard drive?

Evga_ / Nforce 750i sli
June 16, 2012 at 12:51:51
Specs: Windows 7, Pent4 dual quad Q950@2.83GHz 4 gigs
I should know the answer to this but can I use my extra swap drive in another computer or are their issues within the hardware of different computers?

srloren


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#1
June 16, 2012 at 13:16:15
The simple answer is No.

Windows 7 is licensed for use on one computer. To enforce this it requires activating, a process that ties it to particular hardware. If you move it to another PC, even with identical hardware, it will require reactivating.

Now you may be able to do this once or twice, but rest assured that if you continued to swap the disk between PCs this pattern would be noticed. Almost certainly you would end up with a Windows 7 installation that wouldn't work on either PC.


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#2
June 16, 2012 at 13:46:11
Apparently the moral to the story is do not experiment with your computer for fear of corrupting your operating system, which only allows you to re-install a couple or unknow number of times....this sucks and should not be legal if you paid for your software. I have always l registered my software and will continue to. There should be an acommodation for users who like to try new software and tweak their operation system in an attempt to get better performance or as my hobby... I understand that Microsoft, Adobe and others cannot control far eastern and other countries that do not respect copyright laws of America, but hopefully they will not punish those who use their products.

srloren


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#3
June 16, 2012 at 13:54:01
Installing the same software on multiple computers is not "experimenting", "trying new software", or "tweaking the operating system in an attempt to get better performance". None of those is a problem. What is a problem is trying to run software that is licensed for only one computer on multiple computers.

The fact that piracy may be rife in other parts of the world is no excuse.

But, if you don't like this attitude on the part of Microsoft, no-one is forcing you to use their software. Install Linux, FreeBSD, or one of the other free operating systems and you may experiment to your heart's content.


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#4
June 16, 2012 at 14:06:38
I don't use my registered software on any other computer. My work load is such that I cannot afford to spend a day re-installing windows, and all the other software that I need for business use. Hence, the need for a BACKUP SWAP drive for my computer. I certainly get your point and agree with you 100% regarding misuse of a licensed software. But my question was regarding 2 harddrive used on the same computer....just to save time. I use Carbonite to backup my data but refuse to pay extra for their new service that will back up your system. Which reminds me that I have not created an updated recovery disk for Windows7. Thanks for your reply iJack...

srloren


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#5
June 16, 2012 at 14:25:12
"But my question was regarding 2 harddrive used on the same computer....just to save time."

In that case, I would have to say it was poorly phrased:

"Can You Install Windows7 On A Harddrive That Can Be Swapped?" and "can I use my extra swap drive in another computer or are their issues within the hardware of different computers?"

Forgive me if I misunderstood you.

Yes, you can use a hard drive that you have taken out of another computer as an additional data drive.


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#6
June 16, 2012 at 14:57:27
You are correct, my question was not what I intended. I am considering purchasing a new box, motherboard, the works and was asking if I could use my existing hard drive or the swap drive in the new computer. Once I finalize the installation the old box, motherboard, memory etc can be disposed of after writing 1's and zero's to the HD. Sorry for the confusion. I appreciate your indulgence and understanding...my brain is not what it used to be at 71...but I am almost as sharp as I used to be...ha.

srloren


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#7
June 16, 2012 at 15:01:41
Furthermore, my question really is, will a different motherboard accept the hard drive install of Windows from my motherboard? The next question I need to answer is, do will I benefit from the cost, probably 4 to 5 hundred for memory, etc from an upgrade at this time? I have read that Windows 8 is not that exciting nor much of an improvment from 7, it could be like going from XP to Vista...oh, no...

srloren


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#8
June 16, 2012 at 17:14:25
"my question really is, will a different motherboard accept the hard drive install of Windows from my motherboard?"

No, because the hardware is different.

"will I benefit from the cost, probably 4 to 5 hundred for memory, etc from an upgrade at this time?"

How would we know? Your specs are so poorly written it's difficult to know what you have. What is "Pent4 dual quad Q950@2.83GHz"? If it's a quad, it's not a dual, & if it's a dual, it's not a Pentium4 OR a quad. And there is no Q950. Do you mean Core2 Quad Q9550? I know if I had that board & that CPU, I'd be running it at 3.4GHz at 1600MHz FSB.

http://ark.intel.com/products/33924...


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#9
June 16, 2012 at 23:44:47
We now seem to be coming back to the original question, so once again we have the licensing issue. The Windows from your current computer almost certainly wouldn't work on a new one because it is probably an OEM version. That means it is tied to the original hardware. But most new computers come with their own copy of Windows.

Don't apologize for your age - you only have a couple of years on me!


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#10
June 17, 2012 at 09:22:13
He really wants to try to outsmart MS and use an installed drive on a different system.

It has been said very clearly before by ijack. "The simple answer is No."

Rider said this "No, because the hardware is different."

While they said the basic answer they also kind of suggested it could be done. You do not have the means to do that I'd guess.

What a company might do is to have two copies of Windows 7 and they'd make a master copy or template of what they want. Then they'd deploy it to as many as they need. Each machine would have some final start up questions that would include the activation issue.

For you just get two disks or use a single server that holds common data.

Hang up and live.


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#11
June 17, 2012 at 19:00:40
I am not trying to outsmart anyone. I have used a copy of Windows7 on two drives for 1 computer and occasionally swap them out to update them just incase I have a problem. I am not violating the license as long as I only run one copy at a time on my own computer. It has taken the Software insustry all these years to come up with restore schemes and they are always behind the curve. Busineses don't have the time nor patience to spend so much time keeping their computers running with all the spyware, Trojans, and othe crap that we have to contend with.

srloren


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#12
June 18, 2012 at 00:01:12
I'm confused. This does not accord with what you said in #7.

Whatever, you have the answer. 1 computer, 2 disks - OK. 1 disk, 2 computers - not OK. (Talking about OS disk only.)


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#13
June 18, 2012 at 12:30:16
srloren this is how you should be doing this:

1. hardware raid with two drives in a mirror [raid1] if one drive dies you are still operational. The system sees the two drives as one so all files/updates are universal.

2. make a image of the drive and burn it to dvd. This will require you to have a third drive to use for the temporary storage of the image.

3. use and monitor the system restore points so if your system gets corrupted you can get back to a known good point

4. use ntbackup to backup your files. With a image you don't need to backup the OS.

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
How to properly post a question:
Sorry no tech support via PM's


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#14
June 19, 2012 at 09:48:18
Hey Wanderer, you still around? I don't tend to monitor this site unless I am having problems. I have benefited from your posts and those from Tubesandwires, XPuser, and others. I appreciate your post. I am trying to decide if there is enough performance benefit by upgrading my system. While buying 2 drives to mirror raid is a bit more expensive, I believe you have cut to the chase regarding configuration and your advice will be taken seriously...its all a matter of how much money I intend to spend. I do get impatient sometimes in Photoshop....particularly when I have a deadline to contend with. Thanks again and nice to see you are still around and contributing. Very helpful indeed.

srloren


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#15
March 17, 2013 at 08:47:09
yes you can duplicate the hardrive that you have on your old computer and put it on another without any problems, just as long as you only use one computer.. you will not be breaking any microsoft agrrements..

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