BSOD and Crash, But it will boot to Safe Mode

November 14, 2013 at 05:27:27
Specs: Windows 7 Pro, Intel Core i5 (Dual Core)
Computer will not boot to desktop. It just boots to a "snowy" screen. After a moment of this, it goes to a Blue Screen referencing atikmpag.sys and a problem with attempting to reset the display driver. So I tried updating to the newest Catalyst, same problem. But the laptop will boot to Safe mode just fine. So I went to safe mode, Disabled the Radeon HD 7450M, and rebooted. Same problem. So I go back into safe mode and all is well. After hundreds of Internet searches, solutions, and retries, I finally just used the F11 Factory Reset, and when setup tries to finalize and reboot, it gets to the "Setup is Preparing your computer" screen" and does the same thing. Static, BSOD, reboot. When the "Windows failed to load properly" screen comes up, I opt to boot to Safe Mode again, and when Safe Mode begins to boot, I would receive an error stating "There might be unexpected reboot during specialize to BBV1. The process will cause CTO panic because the image might not be normal."

After numerous internet searches I just decided to install a copy of Windows 7. And it went swimmingly. It installed, rebooted, and I began applying updates. AS SOON as the reboot after updates began, atikmpag.sys BSOD. What is going on? Has the GPU failed? What gives?


https://www.dropbox.com/sh/9t2025smqx1okqi/Sj7Y9nDFQw/20131114_013717_S%20Shirley%20Ave.jpg
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/9t2025smqx1okqi/aM3on9YJ41/20131114_013935_S%20Shirley%20Ave.jpg

I apologize, I thought the Forum added the Info I entered to the post. This is an HP Pavilion G4.

message edited by xfile102


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#1
November 14, 2013 at 05:47:58
How about posting a brand and model of your computer.



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#2
November 14, 2013 at 06:11:57
"atikmpag.sys BSOD. What is going on? Has the GPU failed? What gives?"

The problem is obviously with the AMD/ATI software. Do you actually use the Cataylst software? If not, install the driver only. And you should be getting the driver from the laptop manufacturer's website, not AMD.


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#3
November 14, 2013 at 06:12:03
Sorry, HP Pavilion G4 Laptop. Running Windows 7 Pro, Core i5 Dual Core.

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Related Solutions

#4
November 14, 2013 at 06:14:01
Thanks riider, you have always been a wealth of information. To follow up, After the Windows reinstall, I did not install any catalyst software, I simply let Windows Update Run. That's when the problem occurred.

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#5
November 14, 2013 at 06:34:46
Has the GPU failed?
Yes. You could try baking the MB to reflow the solder. There's resources out there that go in greater detail, but it boils down to stripping the laptop down to the MB, wrapping it all in foil (save for the chip you're reflowing), and placing it in a really hot box until the solder between the GPU and MB liquidizes.

Since I gather you're doing this as a business, I suggest you do two things. First of all, call the client and tell him the laptop is toast, but you can try baking it. Explain that you believe the laptop has gotten so hot, that the solder joint between the video and the laptop has broken. By heating up the MB enough, you'll cause the solder joint to refuse. Explain that it's a risky procedure, and you don't give any guarantees.

Once they okay the procedure, go out and spend $40 on a toaster oven you can set up outside. Solder is a mixture of many toxic substances, including solvent and lead.

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#6
November 15, 2013 at 02:55:22
Mmm... Bit of a long shot - but not entirely unknown...

RAM...

Either actual system RAM - which may be shared with graphics; or the graphics RAM itself (if graphics doesn't use/share on-board/system RAM).

BSOD can be due to flakey (failing) RAM.

If you have two (not likely more than that in a laptop(?) power down (and remove battery too) and remove one stick. Replace battery and restart system. Not essential to re-install battery during tests as laptop will usually work without it - but of course will need mains power.

If no improvement try the other stick (again on its own).

If the problem persists with one of the sticks and not the other... then replace the one that causes the problem.

You could also run a memery test util as well - but personally I haven't found them much use... Which is not say they don't work, or have their uses.

If there is on-board RAM on the graphics card too, likely it's permanently installed; and won't be replacable (easily).

If the laptop has overheated... It may have caused failures to any component... Typicl laptops slowly gather dust deposits within the air flow inlets, and sometimes around the fan... Very important to keep the airways clear and so on.


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#7
November 22, 2013 at 13:18:55
So Update...

I may be screwed... I went ahead and looked up the board and ordered a replacement motherboard. Paid for it and it delivered today. I swapped the processor over, hooked everything up, and fired it up. It turned on, but no video. So I look at the board, and there is no GPU chip on it. What do I do? The old board with the bad GPU has a GPU labeled ATI 216-0809024, which a Google search tells me is a ATI AMD HD 6400. Is it possible to order a new chip and glue it to this board?

message edited by xfile102


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#8
November 22, 2013 at 13:56:03
Don't know about ordering the chip... But - how good/adept are you at soldering -remembering that silicon devices don't like being overly heated up. And most motherboards when assembled completely (all permanent components installed) are dipped soldered, or use other equally quick 'n safe methods to ensure a clean job - with no damage etc. to components; heat applied to contacts is almost momentary - flash as it were...

Having repaired a range of motherboards and similar in the past... soldering in a chip with that many contacts is something I would approach with great care...


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#9
November 22, 2013 at 14:52:19
I am just piss poor at Soldering. Would not be able to do that. At all.

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#10
November 22, 2013 at 14:58:37
What options do I really have?

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#11
November 22, 2013 at 15:05:04
Can you get into Safe mode with the new board?

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#12
November 22, 2013 at 15:09:47
I cant get any video on the screen

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#13
November 22, 2013 at 15:12:48
As per #3 above, you posted a laptop but are having issues with a desktop. That is the computer we need to specs for.

Also post the model of the new motherboard.


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#14
November 22, 2013 at 15:22:58
Per #3 I was clarifying that this is a laptop. I never said Desktop. Laptop. HP Pavilion G4 Laptop. Running Windows 7 Pro, Core i5 Dual Core as mentioned before. The motherboard is a DA0R12MB6E0

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#15
November 22, 2013 at 15:32:45
Not having looked at the specs etc.for the board you are referring to - is it per chance a plug-in graphics chips - like most cup are on many a board (at least desktop systems)?

I ask as I find it odd that you (or anyone) would buy a board with no graphics chip installed - unless it is plug-in style; and that "they" would sell one as complete that way - apart from the processor. And main processors (the main cpu) are often a range for a given board; which is why often they are plug-in...

Have another look at the board and see if it is actually a solder in location; or is it actually a plug-in one. Maybe even chat to the vendor about it as well?


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#16
November 22, 2013 at 15:35:18
Just read your post above - arrived while I was writing mine.. ; and note it is a laptop MoBo..;. nonetheless it may have a plug-in graphics chip?

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#17
November 22, 2013 at 15:40:59
I still suggest baking the bad MB. A toaster oven large enough is like $40 at Walmart. It's actually a modification of the same technique they use to manufacture the board.

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