blue screen after startup

August 4, 2012 at 04:12:16
Specs: Windows 7, a lot
I'm having a new computer with Windows 7 Professional on it, and after some weeks, I'm having this problem:

Initially all seems to start up nice, but at the moment when the background processes are started (the icons on the right bottom of the screen), there is a blue screen, and OS restarts automatically.

I used a fotocamera to get the content of the blue-screen (it appears 0.5 seconds on the screen), and it's reading : BAD_POOL_HEADER

The Internet says this could be anything (thanks to Microsoft for pursuing error handling to such a fine level, on this evolution of the system).
I was looking into the Windows events, but there are so many messages, that it is hard to find which one is really the cause.

Fact of the matter is that not too many programs are being installed, not too many are being started. One of the last changes to it was some games I installed, but I don't remember installing anything just before the last succesful restart.

When I do a no-network startup (Safe Mode) the OS starts up just nice.

I'm thinking on re-installing the OS, but before I do that, I'm wantining to know if there is a way to find out what is the cause, but without spending 9 weeks debugging Windows.

Thanks


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#1
August 4, 2012 at 04:34:00
If you can start into safe mode without it blue screening then its more than likely a software issue.

You boot into safe mode

Click start
Type msconfig
Press enter

When the console appears look under the startup tab

From here its trial and error, you will need to disable each program one at a time and restart into normal mode. When you have successfully booted without a blue screen you will know which program was causing the problem.


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#2
August 4, 2012 at 04:57:45
I think that will be something to try.

I'm still wondering how hard it is to store the process name of the process that causes the BSOD, to be entered in the Event thingy. When I think about it, hundreds and thousands of events are listed, but BSOD's are not ?

And then we can see the new USB device .... oooops.

Moving on.


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#3
August 4, 2012 at 05:13:21
error in oem version os . try to format and put a new os before it fully affected

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Related Solutions

#4
August 4, 2012 at 06:00:49
You haven't listed your system specs. "a lot" isn't helpful at all. Disable the auto-restart feature: http://pcsupport.about.com/od/windo...

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#5
August 4, 2012 at 06:31:01
> error in oem version os . try to format and put a new os before
> it fully affected

Afftected how ?

I'm running a non-beta, licensed and legal version of Windows, just mentioning.


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#6
August 4, 2012 at 06:34:10
> You haven't listed your system specs. "a lot" isn't helpful at all.

So, I put there I have 16 Gigs ... now what ?

> Disable the
> auto-restart feature: http://pcsupport.about.com/od/windo...

I'll try that


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#7
August 4, 2012 at 07:01:08
When I think about it, hundreds and thousands of events are listed, but BSOD's are not ?
When a BSOD occurs, neither the Event Logging service nor the infrastructure required to log events even exist anymore. If the page file on your boot volume is at least one megabyte (real MB, as in 1,048,576 bytes) larger than your physical RAM, Windows will dump the physical memory to the page file, and set a special flag. Then, when Windows reboots, it'll see the special flag, generate the relevant memory dump files, and create an event id # 1001 in your System log. You can use the information from that event to open the dump in specialized tools to see the state of your machine at the time of the crash. BAD_POOL_HEADERS are a pain to track down, however, because memory corruption is a huge hassle to track down, and automated tools will probably accuse the wrong component. Driver Verifier is your best bet, but while active, you're stuck with decreased system performance, waiting for the crash to happen again.

 

That's a lot of words, so I'll just get on with my recommendation. Upgrade all of your drivers to the most current stable release.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


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#8
August 4, 2012 at 08:23:21
Drivers is probably where the error is. I've disable ALL startup programs, and he's still giving BSOD, right after User Select (if you wait some time before selecting a user). Doesn't matter what user, normal, or admin. The BSOD itself also does not detail more than what is stated already. The Event manager mentions some error with Root CIMV2, seems like this is the only heavy error (according to Event Manager).


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