Best utility to adjust Windows 7 partitions?

Dell LATITUDE D630
May 19, 2010 at 21:51:30
Specs: Windows 7, Core 2 duo / 2 gb
I have windows 7, kingston SSD. I cloned my drive from my old hard drive but it has some bs partitions I don't need and don't want. Kingston's cloning software didn't allow me to be selective about the partitions at all. I tried Gparted (http://sourceforge.net/projects/gparted/) but it totally messed up my disk. I had to reclone from scratch. After using gparted I a dos prompt type screen that came up and insisted on running a bunch of utilities on my disk. After that completed windows runs but every time with a warning screen asking me to chose from two different 'Windows 7 (Reocvered)." One crashes hopelessly every time and the other one runs but I had this obnoxious selection screen every time. What can I use to repartion the right way?

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#1
May 20, 2010 at 02:39:15
If the working partition is the first one on the drive and contains the boot files required, then you should be able to format the second partition and merge it with the working one if that's what you want, or use it as is.
If you have system files on the faulty install partition and you can't format it, you will need to use your W7 dvd to boot in and run custom install, drive tools to format it, reboot and run the repair option.
You can download EasyBCD (free) and use it to clean up your boot menu to show Windows 7, without the extra (Recovered) unwanted info.

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#2
May 20, 2010 at 05:25:56
There are constraints with any partitioning program. The best thing to do is to create the desired boot partition while leaving all the remaining space unallocated.

Then either install fresh (best) or restore a previous installation to the partition. After Windows is up and running you can then create any additional partitions from within disk management.

Cloning a single mixed use partition doesn't solve the basic issues with that type of use.

I recommend using separate partitions for OS/ programs/ files.


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#3
May 20, 2010 at 07:29:11
The OS is on C I was able to delete the second partition but there is a small one called "OEM" partition I can't seem to remove. Also it's not an option to click on "extend" C: I can only shrink it. How can I make C: take up the whole drive and have no extra partitions?

See: http://www.healthbasics.net/Untitle...

I used partition magic years ago to this type of thing but I assume that software is outdated now and might even cause a problem with windows 7.

Thanks.


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Related Solutions

#4
May 20, 2010 at 09:49:18
You don't WANT to remove that one. That has your restoration files on it.

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#5
May 20, 2010 at 13:23:27
Why didn't you use the built in Windows 7 partition ability???

I support the 'Everybody Draw Mohammed Day'. A religion doesn't deny my freedom.


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#6
May 20, 2010 at 21:14:31
It would be best to keep the OEM recovery partition, unless this is a leftover from a previous operating system and not windows 7. If the recovery partition is directly after the 'C' partition, you will not be able to expand 'C' drive unless windows disk management tools allows you to 'move' or 'slide' the partition to the end of the drive. It would be best to leave the current partitions and create a new one with the remaining space for all of your personal files. If you move your 'Documents' folder to the new drive, you can place a shortcut for the Documents folder back on 'C' drive where you would normally find it as well as on your desktop. This way you will stop thinking about the files being 'over there' 'in some strange place' and and just begin to work naturally with your files (my family barely remembers that I told them I moved the files, since they are 'still in the same place' as far as they are concerned). This can be used for any file folder, so you can have a collection of personal files folders as needed.

As an afterthought, If your old drive still works, then when everything works properly again, reinstall the original drive, format it, and use it as a back up destination to protect those personal files.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#7
May 20, 2010 at 21:18:17
If you really NEED to remove this partition, you will find this easiest using the windows 7 install disk to delete the partition. then exit without reinstalling, and then restart windows and use disk management tools to expand or recreate partition(s).

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#8
May 20, 2010 at 21:56:46
The oem one that's so pesky is left over from windows vista. I want to get rid of it, it's useless. The other one D: i can delete but I can't seem to expand C: over. So what is the recommended tool to make C: cover the entire space, (including the D: parition which was deleted and the "OEM" that i can't get rid of)?

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#9
May 21, 2010 at 05:47:42
Generally I recommend first try the hard drive manufacturer's utility programs for partitioning/formatting if it is beyond what windows utilities can do since they know their drivers best. I have used western digital and maxtor/seagate tools, but have no idea what seagate has available. I have tried BootitNg:

http://www.bootitng.com/downloads-b...

which has a lot of capabilities and has a 30 day trial that should be plenty. I know that it allows expanding partitions and will allow you to delete any partition (so be careful). It works outside of windows so you would boot to it on an floppy or CD. Do not use their boot manager unless you plan on purchasing it for full time use, as well as the feature that will allow the use of more than 4 primary partitions (requires boot manager and is not compatible with other partitions tools after that). Download the full PDF manual and read up first. I hope that this helps.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#10
May 21, 2010 at 05:52:25
If the restore partition is from Vista did you create a Vista restore set? If not, I suggest you do so BEFORE nuking that partition.

The restore set will allow you to restore the computer to original factory settings when you are ready to dispose of it. A computer with an OS is more useful and valuable. Even an OEM version of Vista has some value.


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#11
May 21, 2010 at 05:55:27
I don't need or want it. I have windows 7 now.

So which utility should I use to get rid of this and expand C:?

Would this one be ok? http://partitionlogic.org.uk/downlo...

I don't have access to the windows 7 install disk - its thousands of miles away unfortunately.


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#12
May 21, 2010 at 06:43:29
You are going about this wrong then. You can't merge different kinds of partitions or partitions not adjacent to one another.

Deleting any unwanted partitions will make that space unallocated space. Once all the space other than that occupied by C is unallocated your can then merge it.

That said, I would recommend making a second partition from the unallocated space. IMHO that is a better method of partition /file management. Also easier and faster to restore, should that become necessary.

Have you tried performing that operation from within Disk Management in Windows 7? You should be able to delete any partitions other than the OS/boot partition, which you would be using then.


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#13
May 21, 2010 at 07:10:34
I won't let me delete the OEM partition. It also won't let me merge or extend C: (unless I'm doing something wrong). That option just isn't available (it's grey and yo ucan't click on it). I don't see an option to merge only extend and it's not clickable.

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#14
May 21, 2010 at 07:26:15
Well, if you are overseas and don't have a Windows 7 disk you may be flirting with disaster here.

What partitions are you trying to change and why? Post the capacities of all partitions.

As I stated in #2 above there are some constraints that apply no matter what utility you try. I am trying to understand why this is so important to you.


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#15
May 21, 2010 at 08:55:27
This is not an install disc, BUT, it is a recovery disc you can make for free:


http://neosmart.net/blog/2009/windo...

Some HELP in posting on Computing.net plus free progs and instructions Cheers


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#16
May 22, 2010 at 17:41:01
I just want to get rid of useless partitions and use the maximum size of my disk.. That's all nothing special. I thought there must be a way to do it? I have the original hard drive incase something screws up so I can always restore.

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#17
May 22, 2010 at 21:28:27
finally solved it. just had to use gparted again and then use EasyBCD to remove the extra entry. Works like a charm.

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