Solved ASUSTeK Computer Inc. K54C 1.0 power problem

January 9, 2014 at 00:54:01
Specs: Windows 7
Asus Power notification problem
How do I disable the pop up that pops up almost continually in the center of my screen telling me that the power source is switching back and forth between AC and the battery? How do I know if it really IS almost constantly switching back and forth, and if it really is, how do I stop it?

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✔ Best Answer
January 11, 2014 at 03:53:43
re: "How long does it run on battery, before Windows dies (it usually goes into hibernation before battery power hits zero)?
Some battery faults don't allow proper monitoring of charge status."

Not long at all. 5 to 10 minutes at the most. The battery symbol barely shows any sign of use --- like maybe its down 10% at the most before it starts that pop up again. If I plug in the adapter at that point the pop up still keeps going until the battery reaches a full charge again --- usually about 15 minutes. After that, I can use it with no pop ups until the battery gets down about 10% again. Rinse and repeat.

1. Is that 5 to 10 mins with the mains disconnected. What happens if you don't reconnect the mains. Does the laptop die suddenly after that?

2. Does Windows produce a warning bubble in the Notification area. Does it hibernate or die suddenly before it gets the chance to.

If the latter, the battery is at fault.

If mains powered and all is working as it should, you shouldn't get any battery warnings unless the battery is faulty.

That popup displayed in the video you posted here, isn't a Microsoft/Windows popup.
It's from additional software that Asus have installed.
There maybe something related to this if you hover around the Notification area, down by the clock.
(You may have to click on the little arrow to show everything that's running down there. Better still; r-click an empty part of the taskbar/Properties. Under Taskbar tab, select 'customise'. In the pane now showing, bottom left of this, put a tick in the box; 'Show all icons etc' ).

Now you can see at a glance what's running.
Hover around them. One may be related to power/power management or similar. This is likely the Asus-added tool. Clicking, or whatever, may reveal various options.
You may be able to disable it.
If not, open CCleaner (I assume everyone uses this), Tools/Startup and see if the power management software is running at startup. If so, click on the entry and select disable. It should be disabled next time you boot up the PC.
http://www.piriform.com/ccleaner/do...

Probably a ton of other stuff in there you could also disable, but that's another subject.

Windows has its own built-in battery warning system. As you know, battery status is the little power bar and two-pin power plug icon.
When battery gets low (down to 10% capacity(?)), A small warning bubble pops up in the notification area. If it gets below this (providing the battery discharge isn't catastrophic) Windows will automatically go into hibernation.

This may not operate correctly with a faulty battery.

My gut feeling is that you have a duff battery, but it's an expensive item, especially if the diagnosis is incorrect..

In summary:

See if you can disable the ASUS battery/power notification software, either from the taskbar, or if present, by removing it from startup.

Windows itself should then notify re battery status/low power warnings.
(Small bubble message near clock).

It should run ok on mains, without warning of battery probs, unless battery is faulty - possibly a shorted cell.

Just an additional point: Re WIndows power status symbol
(the mains plug and battery icon).
When running on mains, does the 2-pin mains icon remain constant or disappears for brief periods?

Apologies for the rambling and some repetition. My brain doesn't function too well these days.



#1
January 9, 2014 at 02:03:52
I assume you're using the laptop plugged into the mains...

Could be it's a bad/faulty connection on the power adaptor somewhere, or maybe a faukty power socket on the laptop itself.
In which case - No point in disabling this notification if there's actually a bad connection or a fault causing it. Something needs to be repaired.

Unplug the power adaptor, so it's running on battery.
Does the power-notification stop?
If so you have a power problem.

See that all the adaptor plugs and sockets are secure.

Gently wiggle the adaptor plug, where it goes into the laptop. does the notification come and go. (The mains power LED on the lappy would also come and go).

Another common fault is a break in the power adaptor lead. It usually goes at the power-block end, or at the plug - where the lead gets flexed a lot.
If so - you'll need a new power adaptor unit.


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#2
January 9, 2014 at 13:10:15
Thanks, Peet100, for your rapid and knowledgeable response. I've already changed out the cords, adapter plug and the power block itself with no change. If I unplug the adapter and run it on battery it doesn't do it until the battery runs down to about 90% (a loss of only 10% of the battery charge) and then it takes off flashing again. If I then plug in the adapter it continues to pop up until the battery is back up to 100%. I've removed the battery, running it on AC only, resulting in no change whatsoever.........the pop up continues to do its thing, And, yes, the LED reflects the behavior of the pop up. Wiggling the adapter plug has no affect. As far as operations go, the computer functions normally. It seems that it would work fine if I could just stop that pop up from driving me to distraction. Any more suggestions?

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#3
January 10, 2014 at 00:43:02
Thanks for the concise clarification. I wish I could do the same. ;o(

I've not come across a centre-screen popup warning re battery/mains function. I'm only aware of the Window's low battery warning down by the clock.
Could be there's a bit of extra manufacturer's software installed in there.
You shouldn't get it while on mains power.

From your description, it could well be a faulty battery. If we could find a way of disabling the popup, maybe Windows itself would then flag up a power problem warning.

How long does it run on battery, before Windows dies (it usually goes into hibernation before battery power hits zero)?
Some battery faults don't allow proper monitoring of charge status.

I'm confused about the 'mains' LED status toggling. In most cases I know of, it would only go out when the power adaptor was unplugged and it was running on battery.

You said you replaced the complete power supply unit and it was still the same fault. is that correct?
If so it has to be the laptop power socket, the additional manufacturer's monitoring software, or the battery itself.

As a test, you could remove the battery and run it purely on mains. Then, if there was a power interruption somewhere, the laptop would cut out dead. As it is, the battery cuts in instantly when mains power is interrupted.

If it runs faultlessly on mains, my money's on the battery being at fault.

Maybe one of the other helpers round here could chip in on this.


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#4
January 10, 2014 at 21:30:04
Thanks for getting back to me on this.

re: "You shouldn't get it while on mains power."
I thought the same thing so I took the battery out and plugged the laptop in and got the same old pop ups as if it were trying to switch to the battery and not finding it. I thought maybe that was because the system was trying to touch base with the battery to see if it needed charging, but I really don't know how all of that ties together and that may not have a thing to do with it.

re: "You said you replaced the complete power supply unit and it was still the same fault. is that correct?"
Yes. Bought a brand new power supply, cords and adapter plug, changed everything out, but it didn't make a bit of difference.

re: "How long does it run on battery, before Windows dies (it usually goes into hibernation before battery power hits zero)?
Some battery faults don't allow proper monitoring of charge status."

Not long at all. 5 to 10 minutes at the most. The battery symbol barely shows any sign of use --- like maybe its down 10% at the most before it starts that pop up again. If I plug in the adapter at that point the pop up still keeps going until the battery reaches a full charge again --- usually about 15 minutes. After that, I can use it with no pop ups until the battery gets down about 10% again. Rinse and repeat.

re: "I'm confused about the 'mains' LED status toggling. In most cases I know of, it would only go out when the power adaptor was unplugged and it was running on battery."
When the pop up business starts, the LED turns red and flashes off and on. If I just shut it down and let it charge a little while, when I go back to it the LED is green again.

re: "If we could find a way of disabling the popup, maybe Windows itself would then flag up a power problem warning."
I was thinking along the same line when I originally posted about this. For the life of me, I can't find out where it is coming from in order to disable the silly thing. I don't know if it comes from ASUS, Microsoft, Windows 7 or what. I'm not at all familiar with ASUS, and haven't had a whole lot of luck finding much info from them.


Here's a little background on this laptop.....

My husband picked it up at a pawn shop to use while his main computer was down. It worked perfectly for about 8 months and then this pop up nightmare began. He wasn't carrying it around with him, but rather using it like a desktop, so there was no wear and tear from mobile use. When he got his original computer up and going again, the laptop became a back up. I'd use it when I wanted to take it in the den and play games while I watched TV, which was usually 2 - 3 times a week. I've even used it to show photos to other family members when my office was a mess and I didn't want people in here.
So, as you can tell it was not an expensive machine and we can certainly get along without it, but I'm the self taught geek around here, and I can't stand to see a computer unusable if there is any way I can salvage it. I've brought several back from the edge by researching online and communicating with good folks like you. I'm far from being an IT, but I have learned so much on my own and am fascinated by computers.
What I'm trying to say is, please don't feel obligated to waste your valuable time on this unless, like me, you are curious enough to want to pursue it. I was hoping that someone on here would see my question and have already dealt with this issue and know what to do. If anyone else out there reads this and has a clue I'd appreciate any suggestions, for sure.

Thanks, again, Peet100, for all you've done. At least I know I'm on the right track now. And, if you have any suggestions on how to go about finding the origin of the pop up, please let me know. :)


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#5
January 11, 2014 at 03:53:43
✔ Best Answer
re: "How long does it run on battery, before Windows dies (it usually goes into hibernation before battery power hits zero)?
Some battery faults don't allow proper monitoring of charge status."

Not long at all. 5 to 10 minutes at the most. The battery symbol barely shows any sign of use --- like maybe its down 10% at the most before it starts that pop up again. If I plug in the adapter at that point the pop up still keeps going until the battery reaches a full charge again --- usually about 15 minutes. After that, I can use it with no pop ups until the battery gets down about 10% again. Rinse and repeat.

1. Is that 5 to 10 mins with the mains disconnected. What happens if you don't reconnect the mains. Does the laptop die suddenly after that?

2. Does Windows produce a warning bubble in the Notification area. Does it hibernate or die suddenly before it gets the chance to.

If the latter, the battery is at fault.

If mains powered and all is working as it should, you shouldn't get any battery warnings unless the battery is faulty.

That popup displayed in the video you posted here, isn't a Microsoft/Windows popup.
It's from additional software that Asus have installed.
There maybe something related to this if you hover around the Notification area, down by the clock.
(You may have to click on the little arrow to show everything that's running down there. Better still; r-click an empty part of the taskbar/Properties. Under Taskbar tab, select 'customise'. In the pane now showing, bottom left of this, put a tick in the box; 'Show all icons etc' ).

Now you can see at a glance what's running.
Hover around them. One may be related to power/power management or similar. This is likely the Asus-added tool. Clicking, or whatever, may reveal various options.
You may be able to disable it.
If not, open CCleaner (I assume everyone uses this), Tools/Startup and see if the power management software is running at startup. If so, click on the entry and select disable. It should be disabled next time you boot up the PC.
http://www.piriform.com/ccleaner/do...

Probably a ton of other stuff in there you could also disable, but that's another subject.

Windows has its own built-in battery warning system. As you know, battery status is the little power bar and two-pin power plug icon.
When battery gets low (down to 10% capacity(?)), A small warning bubble pops up in the notification area. If it gets below this (providing the battery discharge isn't catastrophic) Windows will automatically go into hibernation.

This may not operate correctly with a faulty battery.

My gut feeling is that you have a duff battery, but it's an expensive item, especially if the diagnosis is incorrect..

In summary:

See if you can disable the ASUS battery/power notification software, either from the taskbar, or if present, by removing it from startup.

Windows itself should then notify re battery status/low power warnings.
(Small bubble message near clock).

It should run ok on mains, without warning of battery probs, unless battery is faulty - possibly a shorted cell.

Just an additional point: Re WIndows power status symbol
(the mains plug and battery icon).
When running on mains, does the 2-pin mains icon remain constant or disappears for brief periods?

Apologies for the rambling and some repetition. My brain doesn't function too well these days.


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