Solved An apparantly hung PC with perfectly well behaved W7 install

Gigabyte / Ga-78lmt-s2p
May 30, 2015 at 20:17:29
Specs: Win 7-64 Home, 8gig
I have a perfectly well behaved Win 7 install but (there's always a but) if i leave the PC unattended for any length of time, usually more than an hour, when I return the unit is completely unresponsive. The screen is perfectly displayed but the mouse will not move, no manipulation of the keys has any effect and ctrl-alt-delete has no effect. I resort then to a restart and all is well again.

I did muck around with "Rollback and Comodo Time Machines" but they caused all sorts of problems so I scrubbed them Revo. I have no other installations which cause trouble and I have cleaned the PC of all unused installs. So where do I go from here?

All advice gratefully received,

Regards


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✔ Best Answer
May 31, 2015 at 20:26:55
Set Hard Drive to 'Never' power down in power options since I have found that this has an adverse effect on sleep/hybrid sleep and the hard drive powers down anyway when in sleep. Since this is unattended it may also be the same hard drive power down issue. I assume some motherboards, BIOS, and had drives handle these slightly differently, some may experience these issues and others may not. I have found this issue on may desktops. Desktop sleep is hybrid sleep, laptops typically have it as an either/or as default.

Here are some more details on Sleep modes:
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/...

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.



#1
May 31, 2015 at 04:01:22
Try re-installing Windows.

If no change, it may be hardware-related.


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#2
May 31, 2015 at 05:15:15
But... before any type of re-install,,, first ensure all your personal files are safely copied off the system. Typically to DVD of course but an external hard drive too is nice(r).

That way whatever style of recovery (factory reset) or windows a repair installation) those files will be safe elsewhere.

Something to try first after safeguarding files as above...

Run the utility at tweaking.com

It will fix all manner of problems - quite safely. I have used a couple of times on an XP and on a win-7 system to good effect. It's free (but they do appreciate a we donation if so inclined); ideally is run in safe-mode, but will work OK in normal mode.


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#3
May 31, 2015 at 06:10:52
Could be something to do with your power settings? Are you using standby or hibernate? Those features are meant for mobile devices to extend battery life & keep the temps low; they do not always work properly with desktop computers.

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Related Solutions

#4
May 31, 2015 at 11:58:09
I agree with riider. The culprit is probably The settings for the USB controllers or the hard drive. Both are located in advanced power settings. See the power options in Control Panel.


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#5
May 31, 2015 at 17:31:16
Thank you all for your suggestions. Often I come across these terms "sleep", "standby', and "hibernate". I am aware that hibernate relates to laptops but surely the term could be applied to sleep and standby as well.

Usually at the end of a session I set the PC to sleep and when I come back to resume it's simply a case of moving the mouse to get going again. On my laptop there is a setting for sleep as well and I use it also but nowhere is there one for "hibernate"am I being pedantic or is there a difference between sleep and hibernate.

What are the ideal settings for turning off the screen or the PC in the Power settings? For years I have always set both to "Never" and used "sleep" when I am going to be away for a while (even overnight) with no problems. This "hang" situation has only developed recently and it only occurs when I leave the PC unattended but still "on" in all respects.

OtheHill I have never altered any settings in the advanced section although I note that they are different to the settings I have made in the regular settings location. Should they be adjusted too? This may well be my problem!

Trvlr and Phil reinstalling my system is a bit savage at this time but if needs be I will.

Thanks to all, I'll keep you posted.

Regards


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#6
May 31, 2015 at 18:59:34
Try using the balanced setting defaults and if you wish to, you can change the times for display and sleep. That should work.

Note, the default advanced settings for both balanced and power saver plans is to NEVER hibernate.


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#7
May 31, 2015 at 19:23:46
Ewen wrote:

"when I come back to resume it's simply a case of moving the
mouse to get going again."

That's interesting. On my old Windows 98 SE computer, moving
the mouse wakes it from sleep. But on my Windows 7 computer,
which I'm fairly sure has the default settings, moving the mouse
does NOT awaken it from sleep. I have to press a key or a mouse
button to wake it. I wonder why yours is different from mine.

Sleep puts the computer into a low-power state in which it can't
do much except wait for you or some event to wake it.

Hibernate copies the entire contents of memory to the hard disk,
records a note to itself that it has done so, and turns off. When you
turn the computer on again, Windows reads the note it left to itself
and loads the saved file back into RAM

Hybrid sleep is a combination of Sleep and Hibernate.
The entire contents of memory are copied to the hard disk, and a
note is recorded that that has been done, and then the computer goes
into the low-power sleep state. If for any reason the power goes out,
Windows can resume from the file saved on the hard drive. Hybrid
sleep is typically turned on by default on desktop computers.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

message edited by Jeff Root


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#8
May 31, 2015 at 20:26:55
✔ Best Answer
Set Hard Drive to 'Never' power down in power options since I have found that this has an adverse effect on sleep/hybrid sleep and the hard drive powers down anyway when in sleep. Since this is unattended it may also be the same hard drive power down issue. I assume some motherboards, BIOS, and had drives handle these slightly differently, some may experience these issues and others may not. I have found this issue on may desktops. Desktop sleep is hybrid sleep, laptops typically have it as an either/or as default.

Here are some more details on Sleep modes:
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/...

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#9
May 31, 2015 at 21:30:38
Thank you Jeff for your very informative explanation of the various descriptions and thank you Fingers for your advice too. I have always set the HD to "Never" power down and the screen to 60 minutes, perhaps this should be "Never" as well!

trvlr I also downloaded and installed the tweaking utility you suggested. What a little ripper it is! I ran all the tests and it did find faults which it repaired.

I have purposely left the unit unattended for some hours now and the fault has not recurred (YET). Here's hoping!

Thank you and regards.


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#10
June 1, 2015 at 06:33:13
Give it some time and let us know how it goes.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#11
June 2, 2015 at 00:06:04
When I came to "wake" this beast last night it came on with a BSOD error 0x0000001a which to all intents and purposes is a memory problem. I restarted and put the PC to sleep again and left it until just now which is about 30 hours and it came on without a hitch on wake-up.

I removed the memory which is a single 8gig stick, scrubbed it with an eraser and then ran the Windows memory test which came up clear. I re-booted and the system loaded at top speed... no problems. It usually boots up to the desktop and all the icons turn white, they lose their picture, and then one by one they come back on again. Last of all the WiFi switches on (but sometimes not).

This time it booted all the way icons and all, one shot! I'm going to run Memtest later on and see what transpires.

Thank you Fingers, I'll come back later

Regards.

message edited by Ewen


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#12
June 2, 2015 at 05:39:56
Follow-up: I ran memtest for an hour and 47 minutes and these are the results,

Wall Time = 1h 47m
Cache = 8172m
RSVD Mem = 12k
MemMap = e820
Cache = on
ECC = off
Test = Std
Pass = 1
Errors = 0

All in all it looks pretty good and it appears to me that the contacts on the stick may have been dirty. Come to think of it they have not been looked at since I got the machine. I have set it to sleep overnight and I'll check tomorrow. Here's hoping...

Regards


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#13
June 2, 2015 at 09:39:40
On laptops it's not unknown for RAM modules to occasionally loosen or dislodge them selves - albeit only very slightly. Considering the battering some of them experience it's not surprising?

Thus the remove (and clean while they're out) and re-install often appears to resolve whatever faults...


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#14
June 2, 2015 at 15:23:07
Thanks trvlr but the PC in question is a desktop not a laptop... your advice is well heeded though but unfortunately my laptop (Asus) has permanently installed batteries. At the moment my desktop seems OK after the memory stick cleaning exercise.

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#15
June 2, 2015 at 17:39:44
Ah... moving an desktop around isn't that common of course... - at least not nowadays..

And I wasn't aware that some "portable" kit now has permanently installed batteries... That must be a real PAI if/when they decide to fail...? Or is there a way (as with Apple kit) to get inside and remove them - albeit by removing the actual base; usually held on by a host of mini screws (as per the Macbook Pro series and earlier)?


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#16
June 2, 2015 at 19:22:22
I'm not sure whether the battery can be removed by the consumer, I must look for a user manual on-line. It is a pain barbecue I don't get as much battery usage as my wife does with her little Toshiba. I never realised this until I saw my daughters Acer which does have a removable battery. I should have paid more attention when I bought the thing, but there you go!

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